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The Wand 1996-01
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The Wand 1996-01 - Page 1. January 1996. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/946/show/938.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1996). The Wand 1996-01 - Page 1. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/946/show/938

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Wand 1996-01 - Page 1, January 1996, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/946/show/938.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Wand 1996-01
Publisher Womynspace
Date January 1996
Description Vol. 13 No. 1. On some pages, comic strips have been digitally obscured to protect owner's copyright.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminists--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 8 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3634790~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
Item Description
Title Page 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminists--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_507a.jpg
Transcript f January 1996 THE WAND Vol. 13, No. I Womynspace Activities / Networking Directory Inside: News from Camp Sister Spirit Dyke Drama...[cigarette] Butt Out Invites you to attend: Lesbians: To Your Health '96 k A Tu Salud '96 Saturday, January 20, 1996 9:00 a-m. to 4:00 p.m. 1475 West Gray West Gray Metropolitan Multiservice Center Workshops • Breast Cancer Screening Booths • Refreshments Lots of activities for everyone! Schedule Mammogram Appointments in person at Inklings Bookshop, 1846 Richmond (age 35 and over) 8th Gulf Coast Womens Festival April 4-7,1996 Lesbian-Feminist Festival on Sober land and safespace at Camp Sister Spirit, Ovett, Mississippi. Brenda and Wanda Henson, Co- producers. Workshops, night stage, craftwomyn, raffle, good southern food and hospitality. Write PO Box 12, Ovett, MS 39464. "Once we recognize what it is we are feeling, once we recognize we can feel deeply, love deeply, can {feel joy, then we will demand that all parts of our lives produce that kind of \joy." —Audre Lorde activist, poet, lesbian, author of The Cancer Journals Feb. 18, 1934- Nov. 17, 1992 DiverseWorks, Society for the Performing Arts, University of Houston Danc^titvfsfon, and the National Performancepffwork Present the p AT MAIUEYl IT I 0**vnru [making peak wrm THE ANGaS] A fascinating, highly theatrical exploration of the dreaming state, this performance ranges in tone between striking ethereal beauty and intensely physical movement. Threaded through Sleep are women's cultural rituals: childhood, adolescence, communion/bas mitzvah, maturity, marriage, aging, and death. Fri & Sat, January 12 & 13,1996 8pm University of Houston's Lyndall Finley Wortham Theatre Free Parking Tickets: $15, DiverseWorks Members: $10, Students: $7 Oall 228-0914 Continental ARTS j*m m Lesbian Health Initiative: Working to Keep Houston Lesbians out of Bed by Pokey Anderson Over the past two decades, lesbians have been in the forefront of several battles which primarily affect other groups — like AIDS, like reproductive freedom, like environmental concerns. Meanwhile, who do think has been the watchdog for the health of lesbians in this nation ~ the AMA9 the CDC? AIDS groups9 the American Cancer Society? Jesse Helms9 Hilary Clinton9 While our backs have been turned, lesbians are being struck down, one by one, by serious illness and fatal diseases. Even lesbians have been in denial that there is a problem. Many of us were lulled into a sense of false security when we realized that we were at low risk for AIDS. Unfortunately, there are other diseases... Breast cancer is one example. Breast cancer is the number one killer of women aged 35 to 50. More Americans die of breast cancer each year than of AIDS. Dr. Kate O'Hanlan of Stanford says it is likely that lesbians are at higher risk than straight women for not only breast cancer, but lung cancer, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, colon cancer, cervical cancer, heart disease, and stroke. But — and here's the kicker — no one really knows because no one has done the research. There has been little or no interest in researching or funding lesbian health issues by mainstream groups in this country. Lesbian Health Initiative started up in Houston to find out just what the truth is about lesbian health here. Until about five years ago, there was basically no lesbian health movement in this country. Even now, there are several thousand AIDS/HIV groups in this country, compared to several dozen lesbian health groups. Lesbian Health Initiative had little data to go on at the start. Unsettling numbers of our lesbian friends had serious diseases, but what did this mean? We were determined to assess what our community's needs really were, so that we could develop programs to serve real, not imagined needs. What we found, after a large survey of the community that took nearly two years to complete, is that while lesbians certainly need to know about and practice safer sex, basing a lesbian health program solely on AIDS would be like basing a gay men's health program solely on preventing breast cancer. Sure, a few men get breast cancer, but that's not where the need is the greatest. The survey was accomplished by LHI with the help of the Montrose Counseling Center and advice from UT School of Public Health. High rates of skin and breast cancer were found. In addition, 30% reported some health condition that restricted their activities. High rates of stress, depression, and isolation were also reported. Complete results of the report can be obtained from the Counseling Center at (713)529-0037. The survey reflected some of the diversity of the local lesbian community: 612 lesbian, bisexual, or transgendered women responded. Respondents' ages ranged from 15 to 78; income ranged from under $15,000 to over $150,000; all Houston's major ethnic groups were represented; the survey was asked and answered in English and Spanish; and we lived in 130 ZIP Codes around town. Even so, certain themes kept cropping up in the answers. First, lesbians are like the Marlboro Man: "I don't need any help, I can do this myself." As little support as open lesbians get in our society from family, workplaces, health practitioners, etc., it's no wonder we don't ask for help. And, one in four respondents reported instances in the last year in which they had not received medical help when they needed it. Combined with that was a Mother Teresa attitude: "Yes, of course I can help you." Many lesbian have chosen professions where we are the caretakers of others: nurses and doctors, counselors, teachers. Many of us (20% in the survey) are the caretakers at home, for older or younger family members. The result: we as lesbians have often neglected our own health care. LHI is here to change that. Continued next page