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Houston Breakthrough 1979-06
Page 23
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Houston Breakthrough 1979-06 - Page 23. June 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/912/show/910.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1979). Houston Breakthrough 1979-06 - Page 23. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/912/show/910

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1979-06 - Page 23, June 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/912/show/910.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1979-06
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 24 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 23
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_551v.jpg
Transcript -The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant, made by German filmmaker Fassbinder, August 3-three short films, Silvhpoint, by Barbara Linkevitch, Patricia Nixon's Wedding and I'm not from Here. The series will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Channing Hall, First Unitarian Church, Fannin & Southmore. Series tickets are available in advance for $6.50 from the church office or at Wilde 'n Stein Book Store, 819 Richmond. Any remaining tickets will be offered for $2 each evening at the door. For further information call First Unitarian Church, 526-1571. Legislative Alert! Several amendments to ban or limit abortion funding will reach the U.S. House and Senate floor this summer. Write your congressional legislators. They're being swamped by anti-abortion forces. Don't take the right to choose for granted Write today! " Information for Network should be typed, double-spaced, on one side of the page and sent to Houston Breakthrough, P.O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. We regret we cannot take information over the phone. Announcements of events that are free and open to the public are published free of charge. Be sure to send information early. For the July-August summer issue, include events taking place 15-Sept. 1. Deadline: July 5. letters Share your views with other readers in the Network. We welcome letters for publication. Letters must be signed and marked with a return address. Mail to Letters, Houston Breakthrough, P.O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY presents ADVENTURES EM ATTITUDES A 3-Day Seminar Nobody Can Believe Ten adventures to unleash your potential 1. Effective Communication 2. The Dynamics of Attitudes 3. Managing Your Mind 4. Urxleretanding People 5. Developing Your Magnetic Personality July 24, 25, 26 6. Creating Good Human Relations 7. Attitudes & Leadership 8. Motivate Yourself & Others 9. Goals & Self-Management 10. Charting a New Life 8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. (lunch included) For information and registration, call 777-7426 Division of Continuing Education 7502 Fondren, Houston 77074 communicate - to have a sympathetic or meaningful relationship We must be careful not to forget how to talk with one another. I mean simply the imparting of new ideas, the sharing of old cliches—not attempts at impressing each other with meaningless words, name droppings, and "conciousness-raising" terminology. Unfortunately, this latter lack of communication marked the "spontaneous dialogue" sponsored by the Houston Women's Art Caucus in the backyard of radio station KPFT on Saturday evening, May 26, 1979, between Jill Johnston, a radical feminist author, and Deborah Hay, a dancer. There actually was little or no dialogue, causing this purported free and natural event to be at first confusing, then boring, and finally insulting. In the inital confusion, to help guide this spontaneity, a member of the audience asked Deborah Hay when she would dance for the group. Hay assured us, with her carefully composed and blank demeanor, that she was at that very moment dancing for us. It only appeared that she was sitting cross-legged on a folded chair in a semi- trance. Again, in an effort to spark some dialogue, my friend, who had brought her two young daughters with the promise they would hear concerned women sharing their feelings on various subjects, addressed Johnston with the question, "Can you tell my daughters where they are going?" This seemed a valid and meaningful question at a feminist gathering, but Johnston chose only to snicker at it with a lame and very unfunny, "You want me to tell them where they can go?" The evening proceeded with Johnston fending questions like "Where are you now?", with brilliant repartee such as "I'm in a backyard in Houston now." When asked about the composition of the audiences attending her various talks, Johnston replied that they were made up of "nice people." This kind of spontaneous dialogue seems best carried on at a sophomoric beer bust. The write-up in the "Network" section of the May issue of Houston Breakthrough described the Johnston/Hay events in Austin as a discussion of ". . . their new books, the influence of the political forces of the 60's and 70's on their lives and work, reflections on dance, literature and art criticism." I imagine many people came to this "spontaneous dialogue" expecting some discussion along those lines. There were people who wanted particularly to see Deborah Hay dance—apart from her sitting cross-legged in a chair—and were disappointed in that aspect. One moment which could have redeemed the evening occurred when Johnston read from an article she had written in Village Voice concerning the death of her mother. It was about the difficulties she and her mother had with their relationship and how she had not been with her mother when she died. These were feelings everyone in the audience could relate to and identify with, but Johnston mugged her way through the otherwise meaningful article as if she had never seen it before. She went as far as to stop reading to point out a typographical error she hadn't caught earlier. After suffering an hour and a half with this inanity, and after several concerned attempts to make some sense of the evening, my friend and I were treated to some "spontaneous dialogue" from Johnston about how she just knew Gertrude Stein was the "femme" figure in the Stein/Toklas relationship, and that Alice was the "butch." Anticipating from this a flow of Jew jokes, Polish jokes, and Southern Baptist stereotypes, my friend and her two daughters and I left this totally unpleasant, unsympathetic and non-supportive "spontaneous dialogue." Marian G. Ganter Editor's note: Thank you for your honest reactions. We were intrigued by your letter and contacted Gertrude Barnstone, a member of the Women's Art Caucus and one of the organizers of the event for her comments. Barnstone, too, felt frustrated and confused during much of the evening which she described as "very strange. "After a good portion of the audience left, she said the remaining 20 or so began to discuss their hostility toward both participants. Two topics predominated: one, the expectations audiences have (Are they fair to artists?), and two, the desire on the part of the audience to be passively entertained. In the course of these discussions, a member of the audience, Traylene Vassilopoulos, told Hay she wanted to see her dance. "I'll dance if you will," Hay responded. Vassilopoulos eventually got up and touched Hay who responded by moving slightly. There followed a "dance" of movements, countermove- ments and responses for almost 10 minutes which Barnstone described as "very beautiful." While the hostility toward Hay melted in the warmth of the dance, that toward Johnston did not. According to Barnstone, Hay was quite upset by the evening, and could not account for the marked difference between the audience response that night in Houston and the previous night in Austin. classified ads Breakthrough is the largest women's newspaper in Texas. Get your message to our network of readers through the Breakthrough classifieds. Rates are 30 cents a word. Enclose your check with copy as you want it to appear. Mail to: Breakthrough Classifieds, P. O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. An anatomical drawing of a woman showing where ionizing radiation collects in the body is a graphic depiction of serious health threats presented by nuclear power. In black on heavy buff paper, 18 by 24 inches, each poster is $1.25 postage paid. Order from Mockingbird Alliance, 6441 Yi Mercer, Houston TX 77005. Studio Space for Rent to Women Artists and Craftswomen. Contact Jeanne Davis, 524-7164 or 664-8633. Mature woman seeks employment. Business background. Varied skills and interests.' If you can help, call Fern, 486-4405. Sirani Avedis has designed a four-color poster that not only tells people about Paid My Dues but also expresses the spirit and struggle of women in music. The poster measures 17HW by 22V£" and is colored in tones of brown, gold, blue and lavender. The cost is $4.50 per poster plus $1 to cover postage and handling. Please make check payable to Calliope Publishing and send to PMD, P. O. Box 6517, Chicago, IL 60680. Women's Music-Discover the Difference. . .Music for making love, revolutions, or just merry. Written, engineered and distributed by women for women. Available in Houston at The Bookstore, Wilde 'N' Stein, Cactus Records, and B.D. & Daughter. Take an album home for a test spin from the new Women's Music Rental Library at B D & Daughter (1623 Westheimer, 529-3609). Christine Delmas, B.S.N., M.P.H., J.D. and Larry Delmas, B.A., J.D. announce the opening of the law office of Delmas & Delmas, general practice of law. Evenings/Saturdays by appointment. 19206 Eastex Freeway No. 109, Humble, Texas. Phone: 446-8148. Wanted: Painters, carpenters, handy women for newly formed home repair company. Call 522-6894. Only you know the right answers for you. We teach you how to find those answers. ALTERNATIVES UNLIMITED 649-8559 (evenings) A comprehensive, national, interdisciplinary Guide to Women's Art Organizations has been published by Midmarch Associates in cooperation with Women Artists News. The 84-page guide contains individual chapters on visual arts, architecture, design, film and video, dance, music, theater and writing. EacI ' apter includes information on organizations, performance groups, archives, registries, concerts, festivals, and resources (legal, funding, etc.). The 5" x SVi" soft-cover volume also contains an extensive bibliography. Copies are available for $4.50 for individuals and $5.00 for institutions. Send a check to Midmarch Assoc./Women Artists News, Box 3304, Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. 10017. "For Colored Girls who have Considered Suicide when the Rainbow is Enuf," is currently playing at the Equinox Theatre, 3617 Washington at Heights Blvd., through June 30. Performances are at 8:30 p.m., Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings. "For Colored Girls," by Ntozake Shange, is a choreo-poem using verse, music and dance to examine black women's sensibilities, frustrations, loves, hopes and dreams. Tickets are $5 general admission and may be reserved by calling 868-5829. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 23 JUNE 1979