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Houston Breakthrough, June 1979
Page 17
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Houston Breakthrough, June 1979 - Page 17. June 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 30, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/912/show/904.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1979). Houston Breakthrough, June 1979 - Page 17. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/912/show/904

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, June 1979 - Page 17, June 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 30, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/912/show/904.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, June 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 24 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 17
File Name femin_201109_551p.jpg
Transcript women face are a lack of self-confidence and a lack of knowledge about the job market," Creswell said. "We are getting super speakers from the community—the business world, academic world, banking and finance and legal—to participate in our program," Elfant explained. "In the past we've had counselors from the Texas Employment Commission, Houston Community College, temporary employment services and personnel representatives from various companies. "It is important to have community support. The people in the community who have helped us with the workshops have been really excited about their contributions and want to see the program continued." One of the results of the community involvement has been an increase and an upgrade in the quality of job orders coming in ior women in the program, Elfant said. "It is a two-way street. Personnel from companies have gotten to see the type of people who are participating in the program and now they are calling us. "It takes this much time to become established. At first calls came in for jobs wanting slave labor with little benefits. They thought that was all these women could do. Now we are getting a higher quality of job orders—from banks which have teller training programs, the county auditor's office, department stores, corporations and groups who value the mature woman." While the center does not offer an actual job placement service, it does refer women to the companies which have called in with job orders and provides one-to-one job counseling for those who desire it. "We help them with their initial job search and filling out application forms," Elfant said. "We are encouraging this kind of activity from the women and it has been on the increase." Women with special needs or problems are referred to other supportive agencies in the community for assistance. The center also publishes a newsletter after each workshop keeping past participants up-to-date on activities and information and inviting them to a "graduation party" for the current group. "This helps strengthen our network," Elfant explained. The center has also begun a follow-up program. "After six months we telephone past workshop participants to find out if they are working, what their perceptions are about the program, if it worked for them, if they have moved and how they ,are doing generally," Creswell said. "We need to wait six months before^ we do this because this gives the women time to examine and process the information they have received in the workshops," Elfant explained. "They have had time to think about their skills and interests, what direction they want to go, if they need extra education or training. "This is a very intense program. Some of the women have been so isolated and have never been exposed to the work world before and all the information we supply. It is brand new to them. They cannot take it all in in four weeks. We encourage them to go to as many other career-oriented workshops as possible so they get repetition of the material, to have it reinforced, until it become part of them. "We also encourage the women to join other groups, church organizations or singles clubs, to get out of isolation and learn social skills and how to be with other people." At the present time Creswell is busy studying TEA and CETA regulations to apply for funding so the center can operate for another year and the counselors are thinking of ways to improve the workshops and expand the program. During the past year the counselors had a one-week period between the work shop to plan and implement new ideas. Elfant said two weeks between workshops would be ideal so that the counselors could conduct more mini-workshops at other locations and have re^ cruitment weeks. The center had one recruitment week this past year which was very successful, according to Elfant. "We invited personnel representatives from various companies to come in and talk about job opportunities with their firms and set up interviews," she explained. "We would like to do this several times a year." In addition to the center workshops, counselors have conducted several mini- workshops at the Downtown YWCA, Blue Triangle YWCA and Gulf Coast Community Services in Galena Park. "At these workshops we concentrate on job readiness, the job market, job placement and obtaining credit," Elfant said. "They have been very successful. Once the network got out, other groups have called us to conduct workshops." Elfant hopes to do more mini- workshops next year if the extra time will be available. Creswell added that she would like the center to conduct more workshops in the black and Mexican-American communities to serve the special needs of these women. "We have had very few minorities in our workshops," she said. "We need to get out closer to where they are. The idea of coming to the university may seem overwhelming to some and they do not come in here. These women have less means and different things are frightening to them." Going out into the community would require additional staff members, as would other programs Creswell would like to implement and expand if she could fulfill all her dreams. "We would like to have a full-time placement counselor to help women find jobs. We need someone to schedule programs, and a public relations person to get out publicity, so the counselors can work full-time with the women," Creswell said. "We need a psychologist to help those women who have really serious problems. We would like more graduate students from the school of social work to do intern work and research. The center could be a learning center for people in the academic community. There is very little research in this area right now and we need more data to see what areas of our progress need to be changed, retained and strengthened, to help these women." Although the Houston Center for Displaced Homemakers is still so new and in the process of tightening its goals and getting feedback from past workshop participants, the counselors have seen progress during the past year. A network has been formed, better job orders are coming in, their services are in demand, and they can see personal growth in the women during the course of the four week workshops. "We see positive changes in the way some of the women feel about themselves from the first day they come in. At first they may not feel part of the group or have fear and anxiety," Elfant said. "One woman practically sat outside the door of the room at first. Now she is calling speakers and organizing activities. It is very gratifying to see these changes." The Houston Center for Displaced Homemakers is located in the Jeppeson Annex on the University of Houston Central Campus. Interested women may contact the center at 749-3755 or 749-7253. Hildegard Warner is a UH journalism student and a former student intern at Breakthrough. WhoR. ememDersivkarnd ? Who Remembers Mama?, an award winning documentary examining the problems faced by displaced homemakers, will be telecast over Channel 8, Tuesday, July 3, at 10:30 p.m. The film portrays the emotional and financial devastation experienced by these women when they lose their roles as homemakers through divorce. One east coast reviewer called Who Remembers Mama? a disturbing film. He gave; it a poor review because the subject matter offended him and he did not know how to deal with it-much like many parents who find films portraying nude bodies or containing four-letter words offensive. Who Remembers Mama? is a disturbing film, because it throws out alarming divorce statistics, the number of displaced homemakers affected by these dissolved marriages, the salary differentials between working men and women and the high percentage of ex-husbands who fall behind in their child support payments. Who Remembers Mama? deals with emotions—hurts, angers, guilts, feelings of inadequacy, frustrations— of real people. The only actors in the film portray Bob and Bernice Marlowe in a divorce courtroom. The lawyers, the judge, the psychologist, the congressman, the nightclub comic, the displaced homemakers are real, not actors. The courtroom scenes depict the actualities of our adversary system of justice as a game in which one person wins and one loses. The one who gets custody of the children is the one who gets "better packaging as a parent." "The lawyer did a better selling job to the judge," admitted one attorney interviewed. The struggles and emotions of the displaced homemakers themselves tell the story. "I have no hope. I don't know where to go." "I was taught to put my children first, my husband second, and myself third. I was cheated." "I have been thrown on the scrap heap." "I had four children. I loved him very much. I failed as a woman. " "When the judge said the children would go to their father, I felt I would die. In the eyes of the law in this country, I am not those children's mother." "My food stamp card is in my purse next to my Junior League card." "I was turned down for 34 straight jobs." "My psychiatrist said 7/ you live through this . . .' " "I told the children if they came to live with me, I would not take any child support. We would go it alone." "At least not having the children frees me from that time each month when I had to ask 'Is it (the child support check) coming today?' 'will it be here tomorrow, next week, or not at all?' " Every woman of high school age and above should sit down and watch Who Remembers Mama? on July 3. Then dialogue about it— to their best friend, their husband or lover, their sister or mother, their church women's group, their coworkers, their neighbors. That is what the film makers intended to happen. Their purpose in making the film was to provoke discussions of current marital laws and customs, divorce and property settlements, child custody and support, ageism, employment discrimination and sexism. This award-winning documentary was written and co-produced by Cynthia Salzman Mondell and Allen Mondell through KERA-TV in Dallas/Fort Worth, with support from the Dallas chapter of Women in Communications, Inc. (WICI). It was aired nationally over public television stations in April. Who Remembers Mama? was awarded the 1978 Silver Gavel Award by the American Bar Association, was a finalist at the American Film Festival and received an honorable mention in the WICI Clarion Awards competition. Major funding was provided through a grant from the Texas Committee for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Houston showing July 3 is produced by Southwest Alternate Media Project as part of their "Territory" series on Channel 8. - H.W. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 17 JUNE 1979