Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Daily Breakthrough, November 19, 1977
Page 31
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Daily Breakthrough, November 19, 1977 - Page 31. November 19, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 27, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6365.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 19, 1977). Daily Breakthrough, November 19, 1977 - Page 31. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6365

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough, November 19, 1977 - Page 31, November 19, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 27, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6365.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Daily Breakthrough, November 19, 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 19, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 31
File name femin_201109_534bd.jpg
Transcript 1902 -1976 It's been a long, long Rhodes By Molly Tyson When British philanthropist Cecil Rhodes created the scholarship that bears his name, his will specified that "students chosen shall not be merely bookworms." He did not specify that they be male, though from 1902 to 1976 they were. This year, however, the selection committee broke with the tradition that has sent several generations of lettermen-scholars to Oxford by awarding 13 of their 32 U.S. scholarships to women. Two of them turned out to be former roommates from Harvard, and neither of them turned out to be a bookworm. The roommates who were reunited aboard the Queen Elizabeth II as it set sail for England in September were Lissa Muscatine, the skier-scholar daughter of a progressive Berkeley English professor, and Denise Thai, an economics major with minors in touch football, crew, tennis, basketball, skiing and squash. Neither Thai (class of '77) nor Muscatine ('76) knew that the other had applied for the Rhodes Scholarship, but they had been linked by coincidence so many times that one more hardly seemed surprising. For starters, they both went to Berkeley High, though Thai's school (spelled Berkley) was in Michigan, while Muscatine's was in California. They discovered this coincidence on the Harvard tennis courts when Denise showed up for tennis team tryouts wearing her high school sweatshirt. "Lissa came running over and said, 'Did you go to Berkeley?' I said I did, but I didn't remember her," Thai recalls, "She hadn't noticed the spelling was different." Muscatine, the Californian, was playing first singles on the Harvard team until Thai came along that day in 1973. The freshman took over the top position, but as first doubles team they became fast friends and co-conspirators in a cause that would help bring funds and fanfare to women's sports at Harvard. Because of the Berkeley High coincidence, the Rhodes Scholarship coincidence and the fact that they became roommates and teammates in four sports, Thai and Muscatine might seem to be as irrevocably linked as Siamese twins. Actually, they have very little in common besides better-than-average IQs. Lissa Muscatine, an American history major and the flashier of the two, made the Cambridge scene decked out in a wide-brimmed felt hat (pulled rakishly low over one eye) and HI Wm w| 1 ^r4ilH «k ./ -*** ■■ % Jm w v iff EJ{ > .i* 2' -'' ,f w ■ * ***&«- PfWr ^ jj^Bt^o**^** 5*3Bfc^,< ' 8 iSLta_ |' i ^^iii.l.i...il.iiiMi(ifii(iiffli ■ 1 ^^^HP* . ■■■ LISSA MUSCATINE and DENISE THAL fashionable Frye boots. Thai, a more sober- sided economics major, who chose tax rates and bonding as the subject of her senior thesis, preferred jock chic and went in for t-shirts and tennis shoes, both on and off the court. "Everybody thinks we're exactly alike," says Muscatine. "But we're extraordinarily different. Denise is always in control, analytical. I'm less controlled. It shows when we play tennis. Denise always plays well, even if she doesn't win. She has the cleanest strokes. I may hit it all over the court, but I might make a great shot that way, too. We were always under a lot of pressure to be alike, to the point that some friction developed between us when everybody found out about the Rhodes. Since then we've talked about it to straighten it out." Following their tennis-court introduction, Thai and Muscatine became roommates at Winthrop House, which could account for that dorm's absolute domination of intramural competition, and played at least one sport every season. It was varsity tennis and IM touch football in the fall, varsity basketball in the winter Molly Tyson is associate editor at women- Sports Magazine where this article first appeared. It is reprinted by permission from womenSports, September 1977. (though neither had played competitively before), and varsity tennis and IM crew in the spring. In the summer they taught tennis at a camp in New Hampshire. On winter weekends they made a beeline for the slopes. "The first time I skied with Lissa," said Thai, "it had quite an impact on what I thought were my own abilities." Although studying didn't start for the duo until sundown, it didn't seem to have an adverse effect on their grade-point averages; both Muscatine and Thai were A- minus students who graduated magna cum laude. On the contrary, Muscatine considered sports a safety valve on the pressure cooker of academia. "So much of school was mental this and memorize that, that sports was an important outlet. I came to need the release." By the time Muscatine graduated in 1976, the basketball team had shaped up into a Division II power and the tennis team was enjoying an undefeated season, except for one loss to Yale. It was a far cry from the tennis team she joined as a freshman. "It was ridiculous," the former team-captain recalls. "We didn't even have a coach until two days before the first practice." Her first clue to the status of women's sports at Harvard was when old swim team sweatshirts were passed out as warm-up "uniforms" for the tennis team. The second clue was when the coach tried to establish the team ladder based on one day's practice. As captain, Muscatine ^ fought for adequate funding and was appointed to the Faculty Standing Com- £mittee on Athletics, one of three women 5 and the only undergraduate chosen. When 2 friendly persuasion by committee failed, o she and Thai resorted to less subtle tactics. Realizing that the women's basketball coach didn't take competition as seriously as the team did, Muscatine led the upper- classwomen in a walkout that resulted in the coach's replacement. Coverage, or lack of it, in the school newspaper inspired similar demonstrations. "At first we had to march into the Crimson to get coverage," says Thai, "but by the end, the administration and the student body had a change of heart." Adds Muscatine, "Title IX didn't hurt, either." Now 23, Muscatine claims to have been a tomboy since she was 10. "I never went anywhere without my baseball mitt. And my parents supported me. If I had wanted to be a hippie my whole life, that was my decision. They never imposed catalyst The national, nonprofit organization that helps women choose, launch and advance their careers by providing: * Information and library service * Network of 150 counseling centers nationwide * 50 Career publications for women * Resume preparation manual Visit us at Booth 222 Write or call for free list of publications Catalyst 14 East 60th Street New York, N.Y. 10022 (212)759-9700 Mike Noblet for ERK! MICHAEL W. NOBLET. 632 E. 12th, Houston, TX PAGE 30 NOVEMBER 19, 1977 DAILY BREAKTHROUGH