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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19
Page 30
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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 30. November 19, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 31, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6364.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 19, 1977). Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 30. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6364

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 30, November 19, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 31, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6364.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 19, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 30
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_534bc.jpg
Transcript In addition to burdening thousands of women with unwanted babies and driving thousands of others to dangerous hacks or attempts at self-abortion, the ban on free abortions is likely to aggravate the problem of sterilization abuse-that is, the practice of sterilizing women (generally poor minority women) without adequate safeguards to assure their informed consent, and often through outright intimidation or fraud. Horror stories abound; women have been lied to about the nature or permanence of the operation or threatened with the loss of welfare payments if they did not agree; Spanish-speaking women may feel compelled, for economic reasons, to resort to this irreversible alternative (which will still be financed by the state). The Supreme Court's casuistic distinction between forbidding abortions and making them unavailable moved dissenting justices to quote, "let them eat cake," and Anatole France's observation that "the law, in its majestic equality, forbids both the rich and the poor to sleep under bridges." The allusions apply equally well to Jimmy Carter's bland defense of the Court's reasoning: "Well, as you know there are many things in life that are not fair, that wealthy people can afford and poor people can't. But I don't believe that the federal government should take action to try to make these opportunities exactly equal, particularly when there is a moral factor involved." Yet this is no routine case of class bias; the Court's argument and Carter's response are not only chilling but thoroughly disingenuous. The purpose of the Medicaid abortion ban is not to reduce aid to the poor—on the contrary, abortion is far less costly than childbirth, let alone welfare for an indigent mother and her child—but to prevent abortions. Poor women are only the most convenient immediate victims of an attack aimed at women in general. But by posing the issue in terms of rich against poor, the government can exploit antipoor, antiblack, anti- welfare sentiment while lulling middle- class women into believing their own abortion rights are safe; the result is to confuse and divide the pro-abortion majority. Thurgood Marshall's dissent goes straight to the point: "Since efforts to overturn (the Court's 1973) decisions have been unsuccessful, the opponents of abortion have attempted every imaginable means to circumvent the Constitution and impose their moral choices upon the rest of society ... I fear that the Court's decisions will be an invitation to public officials to approve more such restrictions." Another dissenting justice, William Bren- nan, points out that in a number of previous cases the Court explicitly rejected the notion that the state may do anything short of direct prohibition to inhibit the exercise of a constitutional right. That the June 20 decisions are no more and no less than a political capitulation to the anti- abortion movement is clear from the Court's assertion that states are not obliged to "undercut" their "unquestionably strong and legitimate interest in encouraging (i.e. coercing) normal childbirth." Carter's statement is even less subtle; what it amounts to is: abortion is immoral. M the moment I can't find an excuse to impose this view on the wealthy (life is unfair). But at least I can impose it on the poor. The anti-abortionists would be delighted to even things up. In August, Archbishop Joseph L. Bernardin, president of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, called for an intensified drive to eliminate "the evil practice" of abortion. (He also denounced federally financed birth control programs as "unacceptable governmental intrusion into family life.") So far, the campaign for a constitutional amendment banning abortion has failed in Congress. But 11 state legislatures (out of 34 needed) have voted to call for a constitutional convention to pass an anti-abortion amendment. If the campaign succeeds, women will be far worse off than they were in 1969. Reproductive slavery will be enshrined as a basic principle of our legal system. It can happen here. First in a two-part series. This is an edited version of a larger piece that appeared in Rolling Stone, November 3,1977. We'll work tog< for a woman's Mt? a safe and %Ai/ Na NARAL is ir 1 want to work for woman's right to choose. Enclosed is my NARAL membership contribution for: Sponsor _ $100 and up Sustaining/ organization «■■■■ $ 30 Regular _ $ 15 Additional — - make checks payable to NARAL 3ther right to choose legal abortion. tional Abortion Rights Action League i Houston! Mail to NARAL 706 7th St SE Washington, DC 20003 Name Address Phone Cullen Women's Center S offers Pregnancy Testing Problem Pregnancy Counseling and information. Call 733-5421 Monday - Saturday 9-5 pm PRESIDENT EVELYN J. COX VICE PRESIDENT CAROLYN PEELER SECRETARY-TREASURER CREATIVE SPEECH INTERESTS, INC. A FIRM OF COMMUNICATION CONSULTANTS PRE-PACKAGED SEMINARS AND PROGRAMS Who am I? Communication Power! Wielding the Gavel Are You Listening? Woman Aware The Assertive Woman • Breaking the Sound Barrier • Closing the Generation Gap • This Meeting Is Now Called to Order • Effective Oral Communication • The Silent Communicators • Sparkling Speech CUSTOM DESIGNED WORKSHOPS • SPEAKERS BUREAU PRIVATE LESSONS • SPEECH WRITING AND EDITING MARTHA J. HAUN, PH.D. CHIEF TELLER-IWY DOLORES POWELL SPEECH THERAPIST 713-729-6767 11501 CHIMNEY ROCK, SUITE W HOUSTON, TEXAS 77035 To contact us during the convention leave a message at the BREAKTHROUGH/MS Booth. hous'ov-kol'man n. 1. A woman-owned business specializing in quality graphics and printing. 2. A large red brick house in the heart of Montrose. - adj. Having many and varied features. - v. Producing design, illustration, camera work, printing and bindery. - adv. 1. To increase the client's business manifold. 2. To satisfy the client. House of Coleman 901 West Alabama -Houston 77006 -(713) 523-2521 SURVIVORS AND OTHER POEMS 08 £ 00 • Oi • o . a new book of poetry ■ o a 1: by Carol Morizot 2 !2 a c . o Illustrated by Aravinda Chakravarti me copies of Survivors and ot n Morizot at $3.95 per copy postpa »nts please add 20C sales tax per cc my remittance of . book(s) to: o • T3 * o • oo # 1: 3 * F ^ Available at major bookstores in Austin and Please send by Carol An Texas reside Enclosed is Please send Name 0> u X ■o < a • * • © • "O • 1: Houston. Ask for it at your local bookstore or order from harold house > -c • DAILY BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBER 19, 1977 PAGE 29