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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19
Page 28
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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 28. November 19, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6362.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 19, 1977). Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 28. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6362

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 28, November 19, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6362.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 19, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 28
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_534ba.jpg
Transcript "Alcoholism... A Woman's Issue" By Janis Wilson-Williams Of the 10 million alcoholics in America today, at least half are women, but little is being done for them, says an official of the National Council on Alcoholism. "In recent years, this problem has finally been recognized as a major one within the feminist-humanist movements, yet very little is being done," says Jan Du Plain, director of the NCA's Office on Women. The problem of women alcoholics is being brought to the forefront at the National Women's Conference in the form of a grassroots effort by lobbyists from across the United States. Wearing t-shirts and buttons reading "Alcoholism is a Women's Issue," the lobbyists are attempting to point out the discrepancies in treatment for women alcoholics. The t-shirts and buttons are sponsored by the NCA and the Women's Alcoholism Treatment Center of Los Angeles, with major funding from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, an offshoot of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. "The NIAAA has a budget of $168 million," says DuPlain, "yet, of that amount, only four to five per cent goes to treatment for women. The discrepancy is obvious." Additional discrepancies cited include: Of 584 NIAAA-funded treatment programs, only 17 are geared to women. Of 600 halfway houses in the United States, only 30 are for women. Of those 30, only eight include childcare components. Appropriate vocational rehabilitation in treatment facilities are almost nonexistent. Therapy by and for women is inadequate. How is alcoholism among women unique? Nancy McDonald, head of a task force for women alcoholics in deep East Texas says, "Women alcoholics have many unique problems. For one, alcoholism among women is harder to diagnose because women stay in their homes and are protected by their husbands and their doctors-who often treat the symptoms instead of the disease, and consequently help women become doubly addicted, both to alcohol and to pills to 'calm' then- nerves. "Secondly, alcoholism among women is especially lethal because children are so often involved," she says. "I listen to the statistics: one out of 10 people in the general population becomes an alcoholic. But if one parent is an alcoholic, the child's chances of having the disease increase to one in four. And if both parents are alcoholics, the chances increase to one out of two, or 50 per cent. The statistics are staggering. "And a third problem unique to women is this: if a man becomes an alcoholic, nine times out of 10, his wife will stay with him. Yet when a woman becomes an alcoholic, there's only one chance in 10 that her husband will stay with her." Phyllis Reilly, director of the Division of Alcoholism for the state of New Jersey, says, "Since women with drinking problems often stay home, they stay sick longer. They frequently become alcoholic after a personal crisis, such as the death of a child, divorce, menopause or anything that causes stress. Yet women are the invisible alcoholics. Their disease is not recognized, and therefore it is not treated." Reilly says women seeking treatment respond best when counseled in groups of other women. "In mixed so- called co-ed treatment groups, the women fall back into nurturing roles. As a result, they help the men in the groups and don't see to it that their own needs are met." McDonald says women alcoholics are victims of an additional problem because a moral stigma is attached, possibly because of their role as mothers. "Then the stigma feeds the disease, since women don't want to admit to being unable to cope with motherhood. A double bind results, with the woman drinking to lessen the burdens of motherhood and wifehood, then failing to admit to alcoholism because of those very roles which caused it, or contributed to it." McDonald says alcoholism affects a person's self-esteem, which in a woman is often tied up with her children. "If she should submit to treatment in existing programs, her children would be taken from her, and with them her last vestige of self- esteem. It's Catch 22." McDonald says alcoholism is a family disease and therefore treatment should involve the entire family. DuPlain says the main theme of the lobbying in Houston revolves around one vital point-"Alcoholism is a curable disease. There's no reason in the world why a woman in the twentieth century should die from it." IN APPRECIATION OF JUST A FEW OF THE WOMEN WHO HAVE HAD A DEEP PERSONAL IMPACT ON OUR DEVELOPMENT. IF YOU COULD KNOW THEM AS WEHAVE, YOUR LIVES WOULD BE GREATLY ENRICHED. Gertrude Barnstone Dorothy Day Dorothy Hood Anne Lower Ann Wharton ft J. Walker Billie Carr Tom Scaia Dr. Carol Weiner K^iaJ^ Qxd^^^^ Il^M^y RON WATERS State Representative JUDY ELDERS DEBRADANBURG Admin. Aide Admin. Aide ^ rep™ to BETSY SIEGAL MEET THE DELEGATES Mississippi Style Billy and Norma Temple and Mark Godbold drove for 17 hours to get to Houston from their home in Jackson, Miss., arriving here on Friday morning. All three are delegates to the conference from Mississippi. When asked why she was a delegate, Norma Temple replied, "Because I believe they (feminists) are asking for rights which will hinder, not help, women. It will cause reverse discrimination against men." She also felt that there are many inequities in the women's movement citing as an example, "They want marriage licenses for homosexuals and at the same time they're tearing down the family." Her husband, a large windbreaker- clad man, took up where his soft-spoken wife left off. "They're making a mockery out of our justice system. We already have laws-I don't know who they're trying to fool. "They're not having any effect on middle-class women, but they're promising the poor and underprivileged a gravy train." He hastened to deny that the women's rights movement had anything to do with civil rights or that the antis were seg regationist, although they managed to elect an all-white delegation in a state that is 37 per cent Black. When asked about the Klan connection, Billy Temple insisted that very few of the participants at the state level knew each other beforehand. So they did not know until the voting was over that they had elected one Black woman and one . Klan member's wife. "We only found out about the state convention one week before it was scheduled," said Mrs. Temple. "We found out through our churches. Most of the Blacks who were there were invited by the pro- ERA people." The convention held at Jackson was approximately 10 per cent Black. Asked about the one Black delegate, Norma Temple described her as a "conser-" vative, professing Christian like the rest of us. We heard there would be trouble for her afterwards from the pro-ERA people so we stuck around. We were in fear for her safety. "Sure enough they cornered her. She has admitted she was threatened by them (pro-ERA people). Then she resigned. "We didn't hear from her again." Support Human Rights For All People Without Regard To Sexual Preference. Join the National Gay Task Force America's Largest Gay Civil Rights Organization Visit NGTF's exhibit, No. 525-527, Albert Thomas Hall "Keep the Agenda Moving-Let All Issues Be Heard" National Gay Task Force, Rm. 506, 80 Fifth Ave. New York, N.Y. 10011, Tel. (212) 741-1010 Yes, I would like to join NGTF. Enclosed is my contribution for: □ $15 Basic Member □ $500 Sponsoring Member 0 $25 Contributing Member □ $1000 Lifetime Member □ $50 Sustaining Member Q $25 Household Member (for two) G $100 Supporting Member □ $5 Limited Income Member 1 understand that I will receive the NGTF newsletter, IT'S TIME, with my membership. □ Please keep my name and mailing confidential. Name— - Address City , State □ Charge it on Master Charge Card # Interbank # Expiration Date Signature -Zip- DAILY BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBER 19, 1977 PAGE 27