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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19
Page 23
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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 23. November 19, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6357.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 19, 1977). Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 23. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6357

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 23, November 19, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6357.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 19, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 23
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_534av.jpg
Transcript All Woman Crew Produces Seneca Falls South Event By Janis Wilson-Williams How to transform a mammoth convention center over 2,000 miles away into a 1,000-seat theatre working only from blueprints was the challenge facing Women in Production, a California-based, all- woman crew handling staging, lighting and sound for the 25 hours of Seneca Falls South entertainment. Conference delegates and participants can judge their success at any of the 40 scheduled performances running from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday and Sunday and culminating in the Sunday evening Music Revue. Seneca Falls South will include performers in a variety of fields—drama, dance, mime and music from rock to classical. The event has been completely produced by women, all of whom have volunteered their time and talent. Eleven women from San Francisco agement, sound and lights make up the production team. "We designed this whole set-up from a blueprint of the hall," said Barbara Price, . * # x ■-.v-.bL 1 A -, Jl i y***^ fiwW f- *\i4f _ S \V J an attorney who founded Women in Production. "We were sent the dimensions of the hall and that's it. Putting together the staging, sound equipment, lighting and building the stage-all that was up to us. We've been at work since Tuesday to make this room into a theatre. "Part of the excitement is working with women in the production field from other parts of the U.S.," said Price. "Leni Schwendinger, for example, has her own lighting company in the Bay Area, and she's working with Betsy Toth, whose company is in Washington, D.C." The company is also responsible for producing the Sunday night Revue in the ^ Music Hall, featuring Malvina Reynolds, £ Sweet Honey in the Rock and Margie g Adam. "Margie has been involved with us since the beginning," says Price. "She gave a benefit in conjunction with the IWY Support Coalition in LA to help pay our air fare to Houston." "Part of my political work is to be supportive of stage production which helps to present women's culture in the best 'And women on stage best work without way," Adam added, can't present their good technicians." Besides Price's associate producers, Julie Thompson and Petria Mac Donnel, the crew consists of at least two experts part of the all-woman technical crew in each area: stage manager Jennifer James, assisted by Penel Thronson and Elinor Brown; light design by Schwendinger and Toth; and sound directed by Margot Mc- Fedries and Karen Wallace and assisted by Pat Green. STEINEM SAYS- Delegates On The Edge Of History GLORIA STEINEM Describing delegates to the National Women's Conference as "so exposed, so vulnerable-out there on the edge of history," Gloria Steinem termed their goal, "to make a new world." Speaking at the Jewish Community Center Thursday evening, Steinem termed the women's movement a "transforming movement" rather than a revolution, a term she rejected as restrictive and violent. "What we are trying to do," she said, "is to bring together the full scope of humanity." Steinem called for women to understand the power relationships in their daily lives, an understanding which begins "from the skin out." This perception may start with the realization of a simple injustice- unequal pay for equal work—or with a consciousness of the unfairness of a working wife being totally responsible for running the home. Understanding these power relationships will result in a redefinition of pohtics and a power struggle in women's lives at a profound level, according to Steinem. Identifying reproductive freedom as equal in importance with freedom of speech, Steinem said that women must By Mary L. Morse control their lives "from the skin in." She said that even groups who would attempt to disrupt the conference, among them members of the Ku Klux Klan, have been affected in some way by the state and national meetings, and she predicted that no one who attended the conference could come away unchanged. "The contagious ideas of freedom and self-respect," she said, "will spread out and mark the beginning of a new era." Answering questions from the audience, Steinem said President Carter has "no instinctive understanding of women's issues." On the subject of passage of the Equal Rights Amendment, she charged that the news media are responsible for the public's misunderstanding of the issue. The media, she stated, has never set forth exactly what passage of the ERA would and would not do, but rather has simply printed arguments for and against the ERA. Asked whether her attitude was "too materialistic," she referred to the "perverted power structure" of American business and said that it was "a revolutionary act to demand a dignified wage." If, in fact, equal pay for equal work were to be enforced, she said, a major redistribution of wealth would take place. To a question whether the women's movement was anti-family, Steinem pointed out that it was those opposed to the feminist cause who had coined this term. She noted that such opponents were aiso working against centers tor battered wives and child abuse legislation as being encroachments on "the family." € A family in which one person controls all others in the group is not a family, Steinem contended, "but a fiefdom, in which there is one whole person and a lot of half-people." Feminists are working for non-authoritarian kinds of families and toward acceptance of alternative lifestyles. In answering a question whether the conference would support public schools' teaching of lesbianism as an acceptable way of life, Steinem read aloud the proposed resolution on sexual preference and stated that the problem was "accuracy in portraying sexuality. "We need the talents of everyone," she said. "If we do not establish civil rights for women whose lifestyle is different from our own, we will never be able to act morally again." Pleiades Records presents Margie Adam! Pleiades Records, a women's recording company, encourages all women to contribute to the diversity of women's music and to share our growing women's culture with everyone. PLEIADES POST OFFICE BOX 7217 RECORDS BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94707 Our current release: Margie Adam. Songwriter. Record Album $6.00 Cassette Tape $6.00 Songbook $4.00 w/guitar chords Available from: Women in Distribution P.O. Box 8858 Washington, D.C. 20003 Add 10% for postage & handling /1-7AO Ci meat COO OOi/ ^^ 1708 Sunset 528-2264 Now featuring BRIXSOX jazz singer and pianist Easyhours 4:30-7 Tue-Sat Also: PAGE 22 NOVEMBER 19, 1977 DAILY BREAKTHROUGH Also: paintings and drawings by Stephanie Kaldis Lunch and dinner Mon 10-5 Tue-Fri 11-midnight Sat 11-1 am The uptown /downhome place <