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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19
Page 18
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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 18. November 19, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 1, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6353.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 19, 1977). Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 18. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6353

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 18, November 19, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 1, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6353.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 19, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 18
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_534ar.jpg
Transcript WORTH NOTING The face of St. Therese of the Child Jesus takes the place of George Washington on the front of the new Equal Justice Reserve Notes issued by a Roman Catholic group that is working for equality for women in the church. The Quixote Center in Rainer, Maryland, is asking Catholics to put the notes in church collection plates, instead of real dollars, to protest the Vatican's policies on women and particularly its recent refusal to grant women ordination as priests. The reverse side of the bills, printed in a soft, money -like green, reads: "To encourage the Church to celebrate gifts and calls of women equally with those of men in all ministries, I am withholding one dollar from this collection." The donor is then asked to fill in her or his name, and the name of the cause or group that is getting the real dollar and to drop the note into the collection basket. St. Therese was a nineteenth century Carmelite nun who, because she could not become a priest, prayed that she would die at 24, then the age of ordination, so that she could celebrate in heaven "at the age men could celebrate the eucharist on earth." She died at 24. Groups wishing supplies of the notes should write to Maureen Fiedler, RSM, Quixote Center, 3311 Chauncey Place No. 301, Mt. Rainer. Md. 20822. Reprinted with permission from Women's Agenda, 370 Lexington Ave., N.Y., N.Y., 10017. Subscription rates are $10 per year or $18 for two years by individual check, $20 per year by institutional check. Single copies, $1.25. '***£:: r Catholics Fbra Free Choice 201 Massachusetts Avenue N. E. #105 Washington, D. C. 20002 (202) 546-4523 WE BELIEVE: Reproductive freedom is everyonefs right and that each woman has the right to make decisions regarding abortion and contraception in accord with her own conscience. We oppose any efforts to deny this right of conscience through constitutional amendment, and/ or federal and state legislation. INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIPS $10 Rev. Helen Havens Kum Baya By Beverly Hebert Kum Baya (Come By Here) is the name for a roped-off space at Seneca Falls South (West Hall, Convention Center) where trained volunteers will offer counseling during the IWY Conference. The Kum Baya idea is designed to reduce the stress that can prevent individuals on different sides of the issues from hearing one another. It is being sponsored by a Houston-area ad hoc committee whose members are Catholic, Jewish, Protestant and Baha'i. The Kum Baya project is part of a double effort the group is making to support the goals of the conference-especially the goal of providing a forum for discussion of women's issues. The group has also scheduled a special Interfaith Worship Service on Sunday. The Rev. Helen Havens, assistant rector at St. Francis Episcopal Church, said, "This committee resulted from a grassroots movement of religious women who came' together as individuals rather than as official representatives of our churches or congregations. Working together all summer has been exciting for us and we think the benefits will continue long after the conference is over. We hope an ecumenical foundation is being laid." Committee members said the Kum Baya concept underscores their belief that concern for human needs can overcome bitter antagonism. Elizabeth Whitlow, volunteer training coordinator, said she is attempting to involve women with different viewpoints to serve as listeners. "We want to include people such as the Mormon women who are opposed to the IWY recommendations and who will listen from that perspective." She said the role of the listener is not to criticize or convert but to be available to those who need to express their feelings. Carol Kellerher and Charlene Torres of the Family Service Center trained volunteers to know how to function as sounding boards. Professional counselors will also be on hand to offer assistance with deeper problems. Rothko Chapel on the University of St. Thomas campus is the site for the group's second project—an Interfaith Worship Service. The service will emphasize that women can transcend their differences and find strength in sisterhood. Private buses will take delegates to the Interfaith Worship Service, to be held at 8:30 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday. Havens will offer communion to those who wish to receive it after the first service. The liturgy has five segments expressing what the participants have experienced together—faith, strength, communication, unity and affirmation. These elements also form the basis for a dance that will be performed to music by Aaron Copeland. Choreographer Joan Karf described the movements of the dance as lyrical. She said they convey woman searching within herself—then reaching out to God. One of the songs being used, Woman of Faith, was written by Delores Wilken- feld and Millie Cowen, both members of Temple Emmanuel. None of the songs or prayers contain sexist language. Sister Frances Klinger, coordinator of the committee, said that one of the first decisions the group made centered on the nature of the service. "We decided it would not be a compilation of diversity—we wanted to create something from our common beliefs." The overall theme is: I and You becoming We. The unity segment of the service will focus on contemplation of a bird figure— the symbol of IWY also used by the Baha'i faith as a unity symbol. Mary Helen Brown will give an interpretation: "Humanity is a bird with two wings—one is a woman, one is a man. The bird can only soar when each acts in coordination and advances equally." Unitarian Universalist Women's Federation . . .a continental organization dedicated to uphold and extend the philosophy of liberal religion while stressing woman power potential... Current Program Focus: "A Ministry To, For, By, and Among Women," working towards solutions to problems faced by older and displaced women, passage of ERA and reasonable abortion laws, elimination of sexist stereotyping, and other concerns of girls and women in today's changing society. VISIT OUR BOOTH.. No. 133 Booth co-sponsors: the Unitarian Universalist Association, Beacon Press, and the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee. DAILY BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBER 19, 1977 PAGE 17