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Daily Breakthrough, November 19, 1977
Page 13
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Daily Breakthrough, November 19, 1977 - Page 13. November 19, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 19, 1977). Daily Breakthrough, November 19, 1977 - Page 13. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6348

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough, November 19, 1977 - Page 13, November 19, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough, November 19, 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 19, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location Call # HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
File name femin_201109_534am.jpg
Transcript r the . second wave Vblume3 Nomber4 * f"^8"00 of "* new f&™n'sm A Depressing Discourse on the Individual Solution u o^tru Festival Vfomen InPrinfc By Polly Joan In 1967 women's publishing was almost a blank page. In 1977 more than 200 publishing houses and small presses belong to women. And the number grows daily. Probably more than any other movement in history, feminism has been identified with publishing. So many words of women needed to be said and read. But not just words and ideas were expressed—women's publications have fashioned a new and more realistic image of today's woman— an image only women themselves could understand and create. Initially, women's publishing concentrated on poetry. Although every movement has had its poets, the women's movement may be unique in that many of its early leaders were poets. In the beginning there seemed to be no other way to express the anger and frustration resulting from centuries of oppression. In the late 60s and early 70s, women eager to hear others empathize with their feelings flocked to poetry readings. Hundreds of women who listened to such poets as Adrienne Rich, Robin Morgan, Anne Sexton, Audre Lorde, Alta, Susan Griffin, Judy Grahn and Marge Piercy left these readings ready to take their new consciousness into political action. Women's movement poetry was political; it was a threat to the male status quo. It was not considered "real" poetry by the male poetry establishment and the publishing network did not consider publishing it. The need for a women's publishing network was obvious—how else would such important writing by women be made available? Women's poetry generated more women's poetry. New women poets made their voices heard by establishing their own presses. Women's publications printing women's poetry exclusively grew out of consciousness-raising groups and women- writer support groups. Starting locally, some of these publications and presses gradually made their publishing services known across the country. At first much of women's publishing was unprofessional by male establishment standards. Early books, magazines and newspapers were mimeographed and stapled but getting the word out overcame the lack of technical experience. Important as many present-day feminists feel women's publishing has been, too large a number of women still imagine women's publishing to be a group of poets mimeographing and stapling in someone's basement. Nothing could be further from the truth. Women's publishing has grown into a full-blown professional operation. Books from women's presses evidence a high degree of technological know-how. Spined, perfectly trimmed, artistically-designed books are becoming the rule rather than the exception. Many are printed in women's print shops which own and operate modern printing presses. Although poetry books still dominate the field, new women's publishing houses cover the full range of fiction, non- fiction, biography, herstory, reference materials and non-sexist children's stories. Generally well written and well put together, these books compare favorably with paperbacks printed in establishment houses. Most women's publishing houses are still small. Largely operating without capital, few can afford to publish more than a couple of books a year. The majority have fewer than five books on the market. The presses that survived the years of turmoil are publishing a growing num ber of titles. The Women's Press Collective in California with 18 titles has sold more than 60,000 copies of their books. Diana Press, formerly in Baltimore and now in California, also has 18 titles in print. Publishing women's novels since 1973, Daughters, Inc. prints four or five books a year. Ruby fruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown sold more than 50,000 copies of Daughters before they recently sold it to a trade publisher. Printing only poetry, Alice James Books in Boston, a publishing co-op, has over 20 titles on the market. In two years they sold 4,000 copies of their books to libraries alone. Probably the best-known is The Feminist Press, a collective that continues to fill voids by publishing long out of print or previously unpublished historical works of women. Their educational materials and non-sexist stories for children reflect a growing demand for non-sexist high school textbooks which they helped create. Women's publishing has also had to overcome a system that was reluctant to distribute books from feminist publishers. Since establishment distribution systems were not receptive to marketing feminist b_ooks, and regular bookstores did not want to deal with individual publishers, women began setting up their own bookstores. There are now more than 100 women's bookstores in this country. In addition, three women started Women in Distribution (WIND) in order to handle work from women publishers. After only two years they are successfully distributing more than 300 women's titles. Sixty per cent of WIND'S business is with women's bookstores. Feminist magazines and newspapers have also progressed from the mimeograph stage into professional operations. Poetry magazines such as Moving Out and Aphra have been around almost since the beginning. Others like Chomo Uh, 13th Moon and Sunbury, with more than three years of experience, reflect the growing quality and expanding creativity of women writers. New magazines and journals cover far more than poetry. Like women's presses, women's magazines cover the gamut of women's political and cultural life. With a broadening berth of women's publishing experience to draw from, new journals such as Chrysallis, Heresies, Sinister Wisdom and Conditions have started production with a high degree of professionalism. Political and cultural journals like Quest continue to improve, offering a stimulating analysis of women's political theory. Women's newspapers range from radical-feminist to middle-of-the-road, but they too have grown more professional. There is great variety in what a women's newspaper publishes, but all of them cover news about women that most local newspapers still do not adequately include. Within the last year women have established Her Say, a national wire service along the lines of the Associated Press. This has facilitated immediate distribution of information important to women's newspapers. Yet despite all of this progress, women's publishing is not always taken seriously; sometimes the perspective of time is required to recognize a success story. Guide to Women's Publishing by Polly Joan/Andrea Chesman can be ordered prior to its January 1, 1977 publication date by writing Dustbooks, P.O. Box 1056, Paradise, Calif. 95969. Soft cover $3.95/hardcover $7.95. Polly Joan is a founder of Women Writing Press. In addition to compiling Guide To Women's Publishing, she also co-authored (with Andrea Chesman) the Directory of Women Writing (1977). Her book of poetry, No Apologies, is distributed through WIND. She is presently teaching writing at Tompkins-Cortland Community College. MEDIA REPORT TO WOMEN WOMEN ARE ON THE MOVE ALL OVER THE WORLD TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT THE MASS MEDIA Media Report to Women tells you monthly what women are doing and thinking about the communications media in all its forms—print, broadcast, film, music Learn what women are doing nationally and internationally about the portrayal of women in media, about the news coverage of women, excessive sex and violence, etc. Learn what other women are doing — what you can do. Subscribe to Media Report to Women. Regular price $15 SPECIAL PRICE for women $10 (by personal check or M.O.) Send to Media Report to Women, 3306 Ross Place, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20008 ANNUAL DIRECTORY OF THE MEDIA OF THE WOMEN'S MOVEMENT An annually-updated directory of feminist media in the U.S. and abroad. Over 500 entries. Includes special section listing individual media women. Every entry written by the media, group or individual to assure accuracy. COVERS: Periodicals .... Presses/Publishers .... News Services .... Radio/TV groups .... Film groups .... Multi-media .... Video and Cable groups .... Media Organizations .... Art/Graphics/Theater .... Speakers Bureaus .... Music groups .... Regular Radio, TV Programs on Women .... Special Library Collections .... Bookstores .... Distributors .... Courses on Women and Media .... List of Selected Directories, Catalogs. ALSO includes an annotated index of past articles, documents and research appearing in Media Report to Women, in over 100 subject matter categories — useful for speeches, programs, news stories, articles, historical research. All for only $8.00 from Women's Institute for Freedom of the Press, 3306 Ross Place, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20008. (202)966-7783. Ask for the Media Report to Women INDEX/DIRECTOR Y. PAGE 12 NOVEMBER 19, 1977 DAILY BREAKTHROUGH