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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19
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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 6. November 19, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 2, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6341.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 19, 1977). Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6341

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 6, November 19, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 2, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6341.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 19, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_534af.jpg
Transcript Conference Briefs Pro-family: An abused word At a rally at Jones Hall on Friday, Martha Griffiths, retired U.S. representative from Michigan, criticized the anti- abortion and Stop-ERA forces use of the term "pro-family." "Where are these voices in the case of divorced women, sometimes denied real access to the accumulations of a lifetime?" she said. "Where are they as we struggle to pass the amendment so that at long last, a woman in her home in this country will have some value." GOP leader blasts IWY Labeling IWY conferees a "gaggle of outcasts, misfits and rejects," Harris County Republicans' new leader Jerry Smith said, delegates should "get out of town." In his acceptance speech Friday, the Hous- tonian said, "They shouldn't get tax dollars to express their perverted views." GOP woman blasts leader Sharon Macha, interim chairperson of the Harris County Republican Women's Task Force said Smith's remarks (see above) were "totally inappropriate in the context of an acceptance speech. To attack the convention as a whole is one thing, but to personally attack the delegates is unbelievable." Macha is also secretary of the Texas delegation. Boycott taking $ Toll The ERA backers boycott on holding conventions in the 15 states which have yet to ratify the constitutional change is having great economic impact, The New York Times reported on its front page. An estimated loss of $15 million to the economy of Chicago from meeting cancellations prompted the city's convention bureau to urge the Illinois Legislature to pass the ERA. Pro-ERA visitor spending is also being missed in Miami Beach, Atlanta, New Orleans, Las Vegas, Phoenix, St. Louis and Kansas City. GAYS GRANT MEDIA ACCESS At the Lesbian Caucus Thursday night, the presence of the media was hotly debated. The issue was not caucus secrecy but personal privacy. The Lesberadas, the local organizers of the Caucus, were sensitive to the need for some women to retain their privacy. One organizer stated, "The veTy need to have such a discussion was indicative of the problems lesbians face daily. What other group has to go on like this, before even beginning.!" The media were asked to identify themselves. The original proposal to allow only feminist press was amended to include the "straight press" when their representatives identified themselves as lesbians and feminists. The press included an official IWY video team, a radio broadcaster and a number of mainstream and feminist publications. The issue was finally decided by a vote of trust allowing the press to do what they needed to do to cover the issue, without editorial limitation by the caucus itself. A number of logistical plans were proposed to insure that no one unwilling to be photographed would be. But participants were told to take responsibility for themselves in dealing with the photographers. Gay Film Dispels Myths Early arrivals Thursday were treated to a preview of the feature film, The Word Is Out, stories of some of our lives, a documentary by a group of three lesbians and three gay men. The film is "a two hour portrait of 26 gay women and men from a wide variety of social and geographic backgrounds who tell their stories with an integrity that testifies to the vastness of, as well as the individuality within, the nation's gay population," a press release by the Mariposa film group said. The film includes conversations on "The Early Years," "Growing Up," and "From Now On." Speakers in the film include Pat Bond, Sally Gearhart, Elsa Gidlow (77-year-old poet), Harry Hay, one of the founders of the Mattachine Society, and Rick Stores, a current candidate for supervisor of San Francisco. The film's aim is to "provide positive support for gay people to counter the effects of anti-homo- PETER ADAIR sexual myths, and to provide a greater un- The public is invited to another derstanding and acceptance by the popu- screening of the film at 2 p.m. Sunday at lation as a whole." Rice University Media Center. WOMEN IN AMERICA: WHERE ARE WE NOW? "not master and servant, servant and master, but comrades in pilgrimage" DENISE LEVERTOV in the Special Issue of Mother Jones l decade down the rocky road to Liberation, the status of women has changed, but how much? How far have we come? And what lies ahead? In a Special Issue on Women Today, Mother Jones examines the realities and the myths—and you can receive the issue free. You'll find some of the finest women writers in America, some of the toughest issues facing the women's movement. » Are women still playmg the role of second banana? In a fascinating look at women and success, Rita Mae Brown dissects The Five Myths of Female Oppression. ► Is equal marriage an impossible dream? Caryl Rivers offers her own assessment in a personally optimistic chronicle of wit and will. 1 Can a feminist be a journalist? Gloria Steinem describes her own transformation—from the event that changed her life to the peer-group pressure designed to stop her. » The single most important piece of feminist legislation—The ERA—is floundering. Laura Shapiro probes what's gone wrong among its backers, while Kaye Northcott reveals one of its most powerful opponents, the "Pink Ladies'.' • Irene Daval exposes yet another backlash — those annual charity drives that support Boys Town (ever heard of Girls Town?), sterilization and hospitals that refuse women abortions. With one notable exception this entire Special Issue is by, for and about women. The exception? Village Voice editor Ross Wetzsteon asks the question: when, if ever, should a man call himself a feminist? Plus Mary Kay Brown's outrageous cartoons. Denise Levertov's newest poetry on womanhood, a special feminist I.Q. test, and more... all in Mother Jones. And now you can receive it free\ If you like Mother Jones, you can subscribe for a full year (9 additional issues) at the Special Introductory Rate of just $8.88—a 30% saving off the regular rate. If you don't, there's no obligation— and the Special Issue is yours to keep. Mother Jones offers you ongoing reporting on issues important to women, but you'll also find a great many articles that give you insight into the corporate and governmental decisions that affect the present and future of all human beings — and some ideas about what we can do to change things. But let's begin with your place in this world as a woman. Don't miss this free special issue—we only have a limited number of copies, so send in the coupon today. Limited Supply. Orders for this special issue will be sent out on a first come, first serve basis. Later orders will get the current issue of Mother Jones— free, of course. Reserve your copy now! FREE ISSUE Yes, send me a FREE copy of Mother Jones. If I like it I pay just $8.88—a 30Vo saving —for a full year, 9 more issues. If I decide not to subscribe for any reason, I'll just mark "cancel" on the bill and that's it — no further obligation. Name_ Address _ City_ si Jones: ;55 Port! ado 803C ce, Boulder, DAILY BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBt 19, 1977 PAGE 5