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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19
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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 5. November 19, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 30, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6340.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 19, 1977). Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6340

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19 - Page 5, November 19, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 30, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6372/show/6340.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-19
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 19, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_534ae.jpg
Transcript 100 years Happy Birthday Addie By Emily Miller Ladner Ad die Carroll was born in North Carolina in the same year that the last Federal troops were removed from the South, ending Reconstruction. She was a girl in north Texas when her father took part in the run into the Cherokee Strip; she lived on his claim in a dugout heated by burning cow chips. She moved to Alvin, Texas with her husband and three children in 1916 to raise oranges, and two years later, the orange trees dead from a bitter freeze she became a Houstonian. Today Addie (Carroll) Van Verth is 100 years old. She moves vigorously about the home she shares with her daughter, Jessie Van Verth. Her hearing and sight are not as sharp as they once were, but the bright blue eyes are clear, the voice strong and the memory unimpaired. She recalls family stories of the Civil War, of how her grandfather hid his horses deep in the swamp to save them from Yankee soldiers. They tied a rope around his neck and threatened to hang him if he did not disclose the hiding place. Addie's aunt, then a girl of about 17, went out with her penknife to cut the rope from his neck and to dare the soldiers to try to put it back. The men, impressed and amused by her spirit, laughed and desisted. Little Addie was 12 years old when her family left North Carolina to travel by the recently built railroad to Waco, Texas. She still regrets that her formal education ended then. "My schooling was rather poor, and that was the greatest disappointment of my whole life—that I didn't get an education." Her vocabulary and grammar, however, prove that education is not confined to schoolrooms. The Carroll family stayed in Waco only a short time. Then, driven by a devastating series of droughts that destroyed the crops, they moved by covered wagon first to Wichita County and then to Greer County on the Oklahoma border, and finally into the Cherokee Strip, where they homesteaded near the new town of Enid. Building materials were scarce, so to shelter his family her father dug two rooms into a hillside; he was able to get shingles to roof one, but he had to use a tent to cover the other. One day a rainstorm came up. "It rained—and it rained—and it rained," Van Verth remembered. "Suddenly we heard an awful splash from the kitchen. The hog had got out of his pen and had walked onto the tent. Water and hog both came down into the kitchen. The hog wasn't hurt—he walked through the front room and out the door. And the dirt floor being on a slope, the water flowed out after him!" While they were living in the dugout, Addie told her mother that for three nights she had dreamed that they were living in a Recording .our past By Ruthe Winegarten Oral histories are a vital metnod of reclaiming and preserving the lives of ordinary women who have been systematically excluded from history books. Collections of women's oral histories are currently being compiled by the Oral History Project at the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe, among other places. You, too, can be an oral historian. Grab your tape recorder, get good quality, 90-minute tapes and corner your mother, aunts, grandmothers, cousins, neighbors, friends and local old-timers. Once they know you're interested, they'll spin the yarns of old memories into tapestries of their lives—on tape. Important areas to cover include the family backgrounds of the interviewee's parents and grandparents; date and place of birth; size of family; childhood; mobility; menstruation; education; courtship and marriage, and work inside and outside the home. Information about birth control, abortion, illegitimacy, health, church, club and political activities, discrimination, rearing of girls, values and attitudes about the changing roles of women and the current women's movement are also significant. The interviewee's experiences, with and memories of the suffrage movement, the Depression, wars, the civil rights and peace movements, labor union activities, election campaigns and feelings about growing older are worth recording. The kinds of questions to ask will depend upon your relationship with the interviewee and her sensitivity to "delicate" questions. Sample questions might include: How many times were you pregnant? Did you ever hear anybody say she didn't want a child? How did women feel about having large families? What was pregnancy like? Was your baby delivered by a midwife or in a hospital? How long did women nurse their babies? Did your mother tell you about menstruation? What was a typical day like? How did women keep house when you were young? Were boys and girls treated differently? Outstanding oral histories of women include Sherna Gluck's From Parlor to Prison, Five American Suffragists Talk About Their Lives; Kathy Kahn's Hillbilly Women, and Nancy Seifer's Nobody Speaks For Me, Self Portraits of American Working Class Women. Frontiers, a journal of women's studies, is publishing a special issue of "Women's Oral History" this month. For a copy, send $3.25 to Frontiers, Women's Studies Program, Hillside Court 104, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colo. 80309. You can also join the Oral History Association for $10 a year, for which you will receive their publication, The Oral History Review. (Address: P.O. Box 13734, NTSU, Denton, Tx. 76203.) Addie Van Verth new house, and the dresser was the only piece of furniture they had in it. A few hours later, set on fire by sparks from the chimney, the dugout and everything they had was burned, except for her mother's trunk—and that dresser. Young Addie Carroll married Al Van Verth, who came to Oklahoma from West Virginia by way of Kansas; he bought a claim and built a house, and they settled down to farm and and raise a family. The rest of Van Verth's life story is one of droughts and floods, fires and freezes, depressions and business failures, with an occasional stroke of good fortune that rewarded the hard work, kept the family together and educated the children. At one time, to pay off a debt on their farm, Van Verth ran a boarding house in a school town. "I had 25 to 30 boarders, three meals a day, five days a week. What do you suppose I got for a week's board? Three' dollars and a half a week—but I could get enough meat for a dollar to serve them all," she said. Asked how she felt about the many moves and new starts, Van Verth said, "I never did care, whatever Al wanted to do was all right with me; I never did fight back about any of it. But when he wanted to move to New Mexico, the children were of school age, and they had to be in school, so that was one time I balked." She went against his wishes one more time, to buy a house in Houston; he didn't Totsie Stewart want to go into debt again. "I maneuvered to buy that house; I never had undertaken anything like that before," Van Verth said. She rented out part of the house to help make the payments, and things were fine for a while; then the Great Depression came, and all her roomers lost their jobs. "I lay awake nights, wondering how I would make the next payment," she remembered. "There was an old street car with a flat wheel on our line, and I could hear it coming all the way out, late at night, with that flat wheel saying, 'I told you so, I told you so!' " But the payments were made somehow, and her son and two daughters grew up there. When pressed for details on the latter part of her life, Van Verth was vague. With her husband dead and her children grown, life did not present the same challenges. Only her daughter, Jessie, remained at home. The younger Van Verth has been taking care of her mother for quite a few years. Retired for 10 years after a 36-year career with the light company, she is now 75. "Mama's living easier now than she ever did before," says Jessie. The Van Verth family are charter members of the Second Baptist Church of Houston; on November 19 the whole church will celebrate Addie Van Verth's 100th birthday with a gala party. PS. Breakthrough's tapes of the Addie Van Verth interview are being donated to the Oral History Project at the Elizabeth Schlesinger library at Radcliffe College. WOMEN'S AUDIO EXCHANGE... Is a new way to purchase records and cassettes of speeches and documentaries poetry plays and folk music, FOR, BY and ABOUT women, THE WOMEN'S AUDIO EXCHANGE is part of a women- owned and operated company organized to produce and distribute recordings of special interest to women. Here is a catalog which can be used as a resource for women's studies courses....for public library and study group collection....and for gifts. Bella Abzug, Joan Baez, Angela Davis, Lorraine Hansberry, and Margaret Mead are among those women represented in the speeches and documentary section. Lillian Hellman, Coretta Scott King, Anais Nin, Vinie Burrows and Shirley Jackson can be heard reading from their works and Gwendolyn Brooks, Nikki Giovanni, Erica Jong, Lyn Lifshin, Sylvia Plath and Sonia Sanchez are but a few of the poets included in the poetry section of the catalog. Over 100 women's records and cassettes are available now from THE WOMEN'S AUDIO EXCHANGE Write to: Send for your FREE catalog Natalie Slohm Associates Inc. THE WOMEN'S AUDIO EXCHANGE (Dept. H) 49 West Main Street Cambridge, New York 12816 PAGE 4 NOVEMBER 19, 1977 DAILY BREAKTHROUGH