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Houston Breakthrough, April 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, April 1976 - Page 1. April 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6326/show/6310.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1976). Houston Breakthrough, April 1976 - Page 1. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6326/show/6310

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, April 1976 - Page 1, April 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6326/show/6310.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, April 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 4
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name femin_201109_516a.jpg
Transcript Vol. 1, No. 4 April 1976 50 cents UT regents scalpel nurses The University of Texas System School of Nursing, unique in the nation in its autonomous organization as a six-campus network of nursing schools, was dissolved by a 7-2 vote of the University of Texas Board of Regents. Nurses and nursing students charged that the action taken March 26 was the result of a power struggle between members of the nursing profession and physicians at UT's medical schools--a struggle in which nurses say regents sided with the DR. MARILYN WILLMAN doctors. A state-wide nurses' support meeting was called in San Antonio in early April to discuss a course of action to be taken to force the Regents to rescind their decision. The course will center on the office of Governor Dolph Briscoe since he appoints members to the Board of Regents. Regent Joe Nelson, a Weatherford physician and chairman of the Medical Affairs Committee, was the most outspoken proponent of the System's dissolution which will subordinate the six nursing school branches under UT presidents of campuses at Austin, El Paso, Arlington, the Health Science Centers at Houston and San Antonio, and the Medical Branch in Galveston. UTSSN President, Dr. Marilyn Willman, the only nursing school president in the country, and the 30 employees in the System's Austin office will lose their jobs ( sometime before September i) after the System is reorganized into six separate institutions. In testimony before the regents, Nelson was highly critical and uncomplimentary towards nurses and the nursing profession. At one point in the open session he told a joke about a nurse who, when told by a Caucus backs coalitions Women activists assembled at the 5-th Annual Harris County Women's Political Caucus Convention Saturday„March 27 to talk not only about the necessity to use the political clout possessed by women in Houston, but also to steer more feminists into the political arena. The resolutions adopted by the caucus indicated the direction in which women attending the convention intend to see that body headed. •Be it resolved that the Harris County Women's Political Caucus actively seek out qualified feminist candidates to run for local government DONNA DUERK •Be it resolved that the Harris County Women's Political Caucus establish as a priority for 1976 the establishment of a permanent coalition of feminist groups in Harris County. •Be it resolved that $1500 be issued by the Harris County Women's Political Caucus for the candidates it endorses for the May 1st primary; And, that the distribution of funds be recommended by the Candidate Rating Committee and given final approval by the Policy Council at the April 7th endorsement meeting. •Be it resolved that the Harris County Women's Political Caucus - the organization that spearheaded the creation of the Office of Women's Advocate for the city of Houston prior to the first term of office of Mayor Fred Hofheinz - go on record today requesting and demanding that this office be filled immediately in order that the women in Houston have a direct voice in city government. Be it further resolved that the Harris County Women's Political Caucus support and endorse feminist and caucus member Gertrude Barnstone for this office. The resolutions received the support of the majority of the women present at the HCWPC Convention. The individual charged with implementing the resolutions and seeing that the goals of the caucus reach fruition is Donna Duerk, the newly-elected chair of the organization. "What I am personally committed to is broadening the membership of the caucus to include all races, ages and political parties," Duerk said in an interview with Breakthrough. "We are still mostly Democrat, still mostly white, still most professional and still mostly mid- 30." According to Duerk tne tio WPC has much to offer its membership. "We screen candidates on the important issues facing the society and act as a voter information service," she says. "We offer our expertise by our active participation in political campaigns. We not only work in campaign offices, but we also know how to manage candidates and run ourselves." Continued on page 14 doctor to cut an IV-cord, grabbed a pair of scissors and cut it. Regent Nelson advocated a return to traditional "bed-side" nursing care. "We are not giving enough attention to direct patient care," he observed from his having been a patient himself recently. He also charged that UT nurses in their progressive approach were neglecting clinical training that necessitated graduates to take special additional training at UT hospitals. Nelson would not grant time for an interview to KTRK-TV Houston reporter Jan Carson. Carson was able to interview Dr. Marilyn Willman who expressed her concern that "some physicians feel that nurses are getting out of line. This (dissolution) is one way to extend their control." "Is Dr. Nelson one of those physicians?" asked Carson. "I believe he is," replied Willman. The dissolution was billed as an economy move aimed at saving $300,000 annually. (The UTSSN's Development Board annually raises more than $300,000 for the school. If the System is dissolved, the Development Board will no longer have reason to function). "We're in a money crunch," Nelson said, to which Dr. Bonnie Rickleman. a nursing administrator, replied, "Being principally a women's profession, confrontations over who will control nursing-labeled as an economic problem-are not new to us." In response Nelson said, "I've got a real grave concern that you (nurses) are getting a little bit uptight about your responsibilities and the possible confrontations with physicians' assistants. Following the vote one high- level nursing administrator said, "Nelson cut us to ribbons. He made snide remarks. He made us look like we were worth nothing." Most disturbing to nurses was the lack of their input into the decision. President Willman was the first to learn of the proposal- on Monday, March 22. The vote to dissolve the System took place four days later. "They even defeated a motion to present more evidence, to study it further," Willman said. At the meeting Regent Thomas Law of Fort Worth affirmed that he needed more information and motioned to delay consideration until the May meeting. Lady Bird Johnson seconded the motion. It failed. DR. JOE NELSON Luci Johnson Nugent, a former nursing student and chairperson of the UT Development Board, lent her personal support and political clout to the UT System's cause by calling for the creation of a public committee to study the reorganization proposal and report back to the Board of Regents within a six-month period. "What I was lobbying for," Nugent said after the vote, "was simply the chance to have the System's school proposal studied further." In Houston , nursing administrators shared great concern over the decision. "If reorganization is necessary, let's put it all out on the table and discuss it," responded Hope Sessions, Director of Nursing for the City of Houston Health Department. "We need to have a voice. I am very concerned because the nursing community here was not informed. We are consumers of those (UT) graduates." Caroline Blass, Chief of the Nursing Section of the Harris County Health Department, felt nursing professionals had "victimized themselves again" by not organizing politically when rumors of the reorganization surfaced several months ago. "Nurses could have gotten together in concert and had a plan of action," Blass stated. "The profession must get together. Some doctors would like to think of nurses as handmaidens serving them and some nurses view themselves as task- oriented hand maidens. We have to get over that image." Dixie Brown, Executive Director of the Texas Nurses Association, District No. 9, saw the conflict between the regents and the UTSSN in the System's self-directed and innovative curriculum program. "Nursing education here was moving from tasks to technicians. The UT curriculum was exploring not only how-to but how and why." Continued on page 14