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Broadside, May 1971
Page 5
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Broadside, May 1971 - Page 5. May, 1971. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6098/show/6091.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May, 1971). Broadside, May 1971 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6098/show/6091

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, May 1971 - Page 5, May, 1971, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6098/show/6091.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Broadside, May 1971
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date May, 1971
Description Vol. 2 No. 5
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location Call # HQ1439.H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 5
File name femin_201109_092e.jpg
Transcript Different Strokes for Different Folks by Nancy Callen We have all come to this feminist movement out of different kinds and varying degrees of frustration as women. We are all going to see different roles for ourselves then in bringing about our liberation. For most of us the critical first steps have been getting together with other women to talk about the common pattern of our oppression as women. This is not merely group therapy. (The word therapy has the unfortunate connotation that unhappy women are sick and need to be nursed back to some ideal feminine role.) We are not "sick"; we are healthy. We are refusing to adjust to sick roles. On the contrary, we begin the steps to our liberation as we overcome the old prejudices against "hen parties," "just womem's talk," etc. Out of the concrete experiences of our individual lives, we recognize a pattern and begin to identify those assumptions, myths, and institutions of our society which must be changed. We are the ones who must do the major work to initiate these changes in our society. For many of us this will involve the give and take of group organizing and politics. This need not be the style for all, however. There are many projects that are des- parately needed which can be done by one or two people. These projects require neither votes of approval nor fund raising nor extensive committee meetings. Some of them might be: 1. Write an article, poem, cartoon, etc. for The Broadside. 2. Obtain salary and advancement information fraym your place of employment (be sneaky). 3. File an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or Equal Pay Act complaint. It involves one phone call to the Department of Labor and your name is kept in confidence. 4. Investigate a day care center in your area. Call 46A--8030 for a questionnaire which will help you in knowing what to look for. 5. Survey a school reader, textbook, TV program,or commercial for sexism. 6. Ask your local library to display books on Women's History or hold a book review series on a feminist book. 7. Invent a new sexual language, e.g. "If you had any balls" can be changed to 'If you had any ovaries." 8. Note all the he's and mankind's in a philosophy book and change he to ghe 3.nd man~ kind to peoplekind? humankind? 9. Add to this list! Join with us in the style of your choosing! Vote To End Sex Bias The Texas Senate voted approval April 20 of a bill requiring a clause banning discrimination by contractors on the basis of sex, race, religion, or national origin in all state and local government contracts. Sen. Barbara Jordan of Houston, who sponsored the bill said, "The State of Texas needs to make this statement of its commitment." HERSTORY (continued) Zelda struggled, In madness and desperation, to escape her condition but never succeeded because it was not solely of her creation. Once, years after Zelda"s death, an old lady whose house she had visited on sunny afternoons to paint in the garden asked Nancy Milford, "'Where was she that she could not come back? Where did she go? Where?"(p.xiv) In her prologue, Ms. Milford's comment on Zelda perhaps supplies the answer, "She was the American girl living the American dream and she went mad within it." (p. xiv)