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Broadside 1971-05
Page 4
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Broadside 1971-05 - Page 4. May, 1971. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 17, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6098/show/6090.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May, 1971). Broadside 1971-05 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6098/show/6090

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside 1971-05 - Page 4, May, 1971, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 17, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6098/show/6090.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Broadside 1971-05
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date May, 1971
Description Vol. 2 No. 5
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
Item Description
Title Page 4
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_092d.jpg
Transcript ZELDA SAYRE FITZGERALD Most essays on women in her- story are concerned with early feminists and some, very few, with successful women writers. But what a- bout women who were "failures?" One of these recently "discovered" women is Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald. For years Zelda was known only in fragmentary form. She was the clever but spoiled Southern Belle from Montgomery, Alabama, whom F. Scott Fitzgerald married. She was, along with Fitzgerald, the epitome of the Jazz Age—dashing, wealthy, forever young. She was the crazy woman who died in an insane asylum fire. But Zelda was, above all else, Nicole Diver, a character created by her husband in his novel, Tender Is The Night. With the publication of Nancy Milford's biography of her(Zelda, Harper and Row: New York, 1970), we can finally get a complete view of this complex and fascinating woman. Zelda was never satisfied with her stereotyped role. She wanted to be "someone" with something to say. However, she never developed the creative discipline necessary to turn her intelligent insights into finished works of art. The life she and Scott led, Scott's position as an established writer with whom she was in competition, her need for constant reassurance and Scott's inability to provide it, all worked against her. Torn between the desire for autonomy and her devotion to Scott, Zelda suffered the first in a series of mental breakdowns that ended in schizonhrenia. From the beginning of their marriage, Zelda had written short stories and reviews, some of which were published under Scott's name. Her first novel, Save Me The Waltz, was completed in the sanitarium. When. Scott saw the manuscript he became enraged. He jealously resented her stepping on his territory even though he unmercifully drew upon her letters to him from the sanitarium for Tender Is The Night. He also used her diary and letters for This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful And The Damned, and her personality and their experiences for The Great Gatsby. Zelda was pleased with her work still uncertain of her ability, wrote Scott from the sanitarium, am proud of my novel, but I can hardly restrain myself enough to get it written. You will like it—It is distinctly Ecole Fitzgerald, though more ecstatic than yours— Perhaps too much so. Being unable to invent a device to avoid the re- iterant "said" I have emphasized it a la Ernest(Hemingway)to my sorrow. He is a very determined writer, but I shall also die with my boots on.'" (p.215) From inside the nightmare, Zelda cculd still look out with understanding and compassion. From another letter to Scott,"'Dearest— I suppose I will spend the rest of my life torn between the desire to master life and a feeling that it is, au fond, a. contemptuous enemy. ...There's a woman here who wanders tentatively about the halls like a ghost in a poor detective story. It is impossible to feel sorry for crazy people since their realities do not coincide with our normal conceptions of tragedy etc. And yet, a woman's brother came to pay a visit. I thought how awful and poignant—that boney casket full of nothing that the man had ever loved and he was saying that he wanted her to come home again. It made me feel very sorry. I presume he was addressing his past...'"(p.215) (continued p. 5 )