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Houston Breakthrough 1980-09
Page 26
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-09 - Page 26. September 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6077.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-09 - Page 26. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6077

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-09 - Page 26, September 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6077.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-09
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 30 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 26
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_563s.jpg
Transcript GLOBAL FEMINISM Women of the world unite. BY NANCY LANDAU When I returned from the International Women's Year Conference in Copenhagen I heard someone liken the experience to the proverbial elephant and the blind men tale. An apt comparison, I thought. Each of us there saw a different part, no one saw the whole elephant, and we're still putting the pieces together. And mammoth it was. Half a decade Nancy Landau is a native Texan living in Washington, D. C. She backpacks and travels whenever and wherever possible. ago, when the first such UN conference was held by and for the world's women in Mexico City, 200 workshops were offered at the Tribunal, the non-governmental (NGO) counterpart to the official conference. This year's nine day alternative NGO Forum began with 800 workshops scheduled. But because that preset program was quickly made more flexible, participants ended up with 1500 possibilities, 150-175 offerings per day. The range of topics provided a dazzling smorgasbord of choices, and choreographing one's movements was a diffi- The Palestinian question turned women's issues into global politics. cult, bewildering task. Especially since "our" daily newspaper, Forum 80, failed to print a daily schedule after the first day—too little space, they claimed. They did find space, however, for several patently insulting graphics and photos, and many women were angered and frustrated by the internal conference coverage, their lack of access to it, and the dearth of women reporters. Margie Paxton, an American originally hired as editor, was dismissed two weeks before the conference, reputedly to avoid controversy over First World/U.S. domination. Dennis Hackett, her replacement, is British. There were other problems at the Forum. Workshop rooms were small, and, although there were 8000 women attending, no space was large enough for more than 600 of us to meet together at one time. (Some women expressed concern that there was a "hidden agenda" operating to keep us separate.) There was a scarcity of simultaneous translations and earphones that disadvantaged the non-English speaking women, and the native English speakers needed constant reminding about talking slowly and distinctly for the many who knew English less well. Food was scarce and expensive, and many who were sent on small budgets, and others who paid their own way, literally could not afford to eat. Perhaps the most . surprising oversight was challenged in words writ large on posters that went up the very first morning—"A women's conference without childcare?" Word got around that when a high-ranking Danish official finally grew tired of all the commotion surrounding the issue, he did get a babysitter sent over. The insult was compounded, however, when the price was set at $5 per hour per child. But it seems fair to say that political issues didn't dominate at the Forum. "Networking" was the key word and there were many calls for solidarity and for work to strengthen it. Other positives were the interpersonal and cross- cultural relationships that were formed, and the view we each got of the people from other countries. There were 2000 more women present than had participated in Mexico City—an estimated total of 3000 Danes, 2000 other Europeans, 950 from the US and Canada, 250 Africans, and many from other parts of the world. The scope of media coverage and the variety of events that took place during the conference was illustrated by the Danish press: when the Nordic women made a plea for peace, called for an end to the arms race, and petitioned the official conference with half a million signatures of support; when the Ukranians in exile made a plea for their people in the USSR with a 24 hour hunger strike; when there was an animated debate between American reporters and Iranian delegates; when the Soviet feminists who defected were received at the conference; when a coup took place in Bolivia, and the Bolivian women scuffled with police at the Bella Center, attempting a plea for support; when Sarah Weddington made a dramatic speech on women's issues; when the two- time airplane hijacker and the women of the Palestinian contingent received much publicity; when the Group of 77 (most of the developing countries) equated Zionism with racism. Because of the Zionism issue, the decision to channel funds for Palestinian 24 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH