Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Breakthrough 1980-09
Pages 24 and 25
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough 1980-09 - Pages 24 and 25. September 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 29, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6076.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-09 - Pages 24 and 25. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6076

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-09 - Pages 24 and 25, September 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 29, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6076.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-09
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 30 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Pages 24 and 25
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_563r.jpg
Transcript "The Chamber of Commerce doesn't mind organization at the local level if it's involved with things like beautifi- cation," says Cortes, who feels that the Chamber is the city's 'Shadow Government.' "But it doesn't want neighborhoods to get together to ask questions about flooding or what kind of police department the city has." TMO, which operates at a budget of $100,000 annually, is organized into nine clusters in different geographical areas of the city. An executive committee composed of members from each cluster is the group's decision-making body. All decisions are made by TMO members with the staff advising and providing the organizational footwork. Most churches joined the coalition as part of their church development programs to expand congregations and develop church leadership. At TMO, emphasis is placed on "natural leaders"-PTA presidents, teachers, or neighborhood leaders. "I have personally learned to articulate my thoughts better," says Helen Coogan, a member of St. Theresa's Church off Memorial Drive who led a successful TMO drive to clean up a Weingarten's store on Washington Dr. "We used to shy away from dealing directly with authorities or would work through a friend of a friend. We're not dealing that way anymore." "It's hard to get people to accept the fact that they know as much as elected officials do," explains Cortes. "They tend to see people in power as authority. If they disapprove of things, they think the official is right." In its community education, TMO uses two intertwined methods. Weekly scriptural study workshops taught by the staff are based on the Biblical writings of St. Paul, St. Matthew and Corinthians which emphasize reaching out and helping people. The second are workshops about specific community topics which concern residents, like the Hardy Toll Road. A recent workshop on Houston's Community Development Program provided a history of the federal program, Houston's success in implementing it, examples of how the program has worked elsewhere, and what area residents could do to make it more effective for them. "What do you want to do about Community Development? It's up to you," says Cortes to a group of about 20 TMO members meeting at St. Peter Claver Church in northeast Houston's Settegast area. The concensus was to form a Community Development task force. Once a task force is underway, it calls public meetings with area officials who have jurisdiction over the subject, whether flood control, police protection or chemical pollution. The task force develops a list of the most pertinent questions related to the issue for their Beatrice Quintero lays it on the line. area, prints a meeting agenda for participants, and proceeds to formally ask the officials the questions one by one. "We have only a certain amount of time to get the information," says Zukero. "We can't waste time with super- visionai stuff." The crisp business-like format of TMO meetings, which always end as promptly on schedule as they begin, is part of the accountability aspect of their efforts. For instance, the group is never publicly on first name basis with politicians even if they're as closely allied with TMO as City Councilman Dale Gorczynski who has participated in IAF training. "We want to establish respect for boundaries," says Cortes. "Public officials often try to destroy boundaries. They ask people to trust them, to consider them friends, so that they don't have to answer anything too specific or put anything in writing. Informality violates accountability." The TMO staff also sometimes recommends that members watch newspaper reporters on Meet the Press to perfect persistence in asking questions. As effective as TMO is becoming, both staff and members insist that they want no political power in and of itself, but for the betterment of Houston as a place to live. Unlike San Antonio's COPS program, Houston's TMO is multi-racial and multi-denominational with leaders from Protestant and Jewish congregations as well as Roman Catholic churches. As a result of the cluster strategy, church members are traveling around the city to attend meetings in neighborhoods they've never seen or heard of before. "It's almost like TMO is tying the city together," says Zukero, who traveled recently into the Fifth Ward to attend a meeting at St. Ambrose Church. Almost all TMO 'members say the strength of TMO lies in its formation within the churches. "We will all come and go," says Zukero, "but the churches and communities will stay." The church base of TMO also affords a defense against criticism as being self- serving. Its roots lie with Houston citizens who have a deep historical commitment to improving humankind's lot in life. And Houston, even with its growing non-commital urbanity, comprises much of its identity from religious virtue, fundamental and otherwise. TMO is simply taking care of the city's own. UPDATE: On August 26th, Harris County's Commissioners Court convened again and voted to support the study for the Hardy Toll Road. The reversal came about after Judge Jon Lindsay, absent during the first vote, issued a release endorsing completion of the toll road study. Also on the agenda for that meeting were four requests from the county engineers office for authorization to begin negotiations with engineers concerning widening of the Hardy Street right of way off FM 1960, preliminary roadway plans for grade separation along Hardy Street, road tests for Old Hummel Road which runs parallel to Hardy, an authorization for Southern Bell to install buried cable lines along Hardy. City Councilman Dale Gorczynski said the court changed its mind after "being heavily pressured by highway people and Chamber of Commerce people. Studies have a way of becoming reality very soon," said Gorcynski. "This is a thinly veiled attempt to breathe life into a dead corpse." Brian McCann of the TMO Hardy Toll Road Task Force said that "commissioners owed the public an explanation of why they switched their vote." Lindsay retaliated by saying that the TMO was using the issue "to the detriment of the entire community for their own political gain. It's narrow-minded and short-sighted." 1111 a great business unity for women JJfame factory *ottciy It's one of the few businesses you can own and open your doors with an initial cash requirement of less than $20,000* ... which includes equipment, inventory, training, operating assistance, and beginning operating capital. Balance is financiable. fflQIIHJ rQQ%Ollp is the largest and most successful do-it-yourself picture framing organization in the United States. NOT ONE OF OUR SHOPS HAS EVER FAILED! Several prime locations are now available in the Houston Metro area — Bear Creek, Katy, Fondren/Southwest, Braeswood, Memorial/Northwest, Hwy. 1960, Greenway Plaza, West University, Clear Lake City, Alief, Baytown, Friendswood, and areas throughout Texas. Learn about this profitable, enjoyable opportunity for a woman to own her own business. Call: (713)467-1841 We're working to make Houston a city of neighbors! If you feel you have received different treatment in any aspect of housing because of your race, sex, national origin or religion, contact the City of Houston's Fair Housing Division at 222-5411. SEPTEMBER 23