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Houston Breakthrough 1980-09
Pages 14 and 15
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-09 - Pages 14 and 15. September 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6071.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-09 - Pages 14 and 15. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6071

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-09 - Pages 14 and 15, September 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6071.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-09
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 30 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Pages 14 and 15
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_563m.jpg
Transcript w i- ■^"■> d,:::;V:?- .> .J>U ,, V' ! \ .^iS^Sk^V ,, :,>,. ACCU-MEN. INC. TEMPORARY LABOR SERVICE SKILLED* UNSKILLED LABOR- 1115 LEELAND HARD TIMES Deflation in the job market and inflation in the supermarket BY MORRIS EDELSON Goat's milk is selling well again. So are, says the Wall Street Journal, comic books, freeze-dried survival foods, insect spray, cigarettes and Gospel sheet music. These products are on a list of economic "counter indicators," moving up when the standard of living moves down. It's been six years since things looked so good for goat's milk, but, unfortunately, the counter-cyclical business sector makes up only three percent of the nation's production. Its silver lining outlines a rather dark cloud over the rest of us. Even though the economic downturn hit the blue collar workers in autos, steel and residential housing worst, the rest of the country and other sectors of the the economy are feeling affected. Jimmy Gannes, a vice-president of Curtis Steel Company, Detroit, suggested one result: "We're sending the Sunbelt our problems," he said. "Detroit is going to be a smaller, quieter, cleaner town and will have less unemployment in the next decade." Houston, he estimated, would experience a. service and housing strain, a crash program to bring its services, roads and helping professions up to scratch, and then, as oil peters out, a surplus work force. Those who might want to buy a house or car these days are suffering right along with Detroit and Pittsburgh, too. The idea of paying 20% interest on a loan for big-ticket items staggers them, so people are needing housing and transport. The anti-inflation high prime interest rate is being passed along, too, by big corporations to the average consumer. Both candidates vow to keep the prime lending rate (for big corporations) down in the future. Both have promised tax reductions for business and maybe people, and both vow to achieve a balanced budget and an end to an 18% annual cost of living increase. Reagancarter Inflationexplanation Both Ronald Reagan and Jimmy Carter, says Bryn Mawr economist Richard DuBoff, accept the premises of classical economics. Our present predicament arose, so say the textbooks, because of rising costs in industry, a drop in productivity and consequent less savings. Industry passed along costs, people could not afford to buy, and some people got laid off, worsening the situation. Instead of knuckling down, people just went on a buying binge, expecting costs to rise each year. People's spendthrift mentality, their wild use of credit and their resistance to hard work have been major factors in pushing up the cost of living to its present annual 18% increase. We have deflation in the job market and inflation in the supermarkets. What the textbooks think we should have is flation, period. Economists who hold to classic views believe that the federal government is another culprit in inflation, since it wallows in red ink, allowing too much credit to itself and others, creating money as it operates do-gooder projects such as welfare, environment and worker safety programs. The government distorts the efficiency of the marketplace and our society (an extension of the market) whenever it introduces an economic or social policy. Free Market forces organize all human activity most efficiently, be it work, leisure, marriage, crime or education-all should be seen as market transactions. In the traditional view, whether liberal or conservative, real unemployment is actually near zero. People can get jobs and improve their economic condition if they really want to. Many supposedly out of work people are only slightly interested in a 9 to 5 routine. Unemployment is a form of leisure, a choice, so those enjoying it are not in real difficulty. Herbert Stein, chair of the Presidential Council of Economic Advisors, said in I974, "Present employment has only a very slight misery component." To increase productivity on an infinitely rising scale, says textbook economics using traditional Supply and Demand charts, it is necessary to keep taxes low on business and use what amounts to a regressive income tax on people, rewarding the most product ive, richest elements of society. Any hindering of these productive (rich) elements hinders production increase, so there should be few corprate taxes, no unions, and little government intervention in the economy. DuBoff argues that this economic ideology, currently embraced by Republican and Democratic parties, is bunk. The basic premise here is that government gets in the way of Big Business, but, he says, "Economic decisions in our country begin and end with the private sector. The government comes in only as a rescue squad. The New Deal came after the Great Depression. The government does not interfere with large corporations now until they become dysfunctional, as in the case of Chrysler or Boeing." The government has entered the world of business more apparently in the 1970s, says DuBoff, only because the problems .of and challenges to business increase. Corporations have not been able to absorb the labor force in recent times, except during the Korean and Vietnam Wars, when unemployment fell to less than 4%. At the time of those wars, the big corporations spent like there was no tomorrow, just as did the workforce- and inflation rose rapidly. Big corporations complain about government consumer safeguards, social security and health and safety programs- yet each program was introduced on behalf of business faced with a demoralized, suspicious, potentially angry and dangerous work force. Nonetheless, DuBoff points out, each government initiative has been met recently by an opposite and equal counterpush by the controllers of private capital-there is open business warfare against OSHA and the Federal Trade Commission. Corporations want to roll back the clock to when, asks DuBoff, to the 1920s, which led to economic collapse after a decade of untrammelled business initiative and consequent child labor, political corruption, and cultural decadence? You Can't Take It With You Professor Barton Smith of the Univer- FORI o *SJ7*n „