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Houston Breakthrough 1980-09
Pages 8 and 9
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-09 - Pages 8 and 9. September 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6066.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-09 - Pages 8 and 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6066

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-09 - Pages 8 and 9, September 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6066.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-09
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 30 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Pages 8 and 9
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_563h.jpg
Transcript LOCAL COLOR According to UT Medical Center p r man Stephen Stuyck, there has been unjustified complaining going on about the half- million dollar home purchased for Charles LeMaistre,head of the UT Medical Center. The move was necessary because of the danger to LeMaistre's life- commuting daily from his house in the Tanglewood subdivision of Houston to the Medical Center. According to Stuyck, LeMaistre is forced to drive to work daily on the Southwest Freeway, and occasionally even on the dreaded South Loop West. The risk is too great, Stuyck feels, for a man who is totally indispensable to the medical world.Contemplated use of a Life Flite helicopter had been ruled out due to excessive patient use of that vehicle. According to Nicholas Chriss of the Houston Chronicle, LeMaistre's new residence has Bray's Bayou running through it. "We jumped at the chance to get the (LeMaistre) house, "said Stuyck,"lt is adjacent to the Texas Medical Center (but separated by a bayou)- and as the center expands, we can tear it down and use the space." Footnote: Moving to Houston is a step down for LeMaistre whose previous house in Austin, when he was a short term Chancellor of the UT, was a million dollars in value. Campaign manager Bill Oliver says that the Ron Waters campaign for State Senator was, in spite of Waters' loss to Jack Ogg, a "good thing." It is a difficult district, he pointed out, for a progressive to win. Ogg was able to use Waters' Montrose support against the challenger, but the outcome was close enough to be "agonizing." Waters will continue his work for the Houston Apartment Association and his interest in public life and urban legislation in Austin. State Senator Ogg showed up at the benefit to raise money to cover debts for the losing candidate and presented a check even, along with a good sportsmanship speech. Although the Senator may have looked like a million dollars doing it, his check was substantially smaller than the rumoured two or five thousand. Oliver's recent campaign organization of the Houston Fire Fighters Association bid for a pay raise was also turned back by Houston voters. "The firefighters are trapped," said Oliver,"in a situation where they were perceived as being i related to the police. The general public's att tude toward the police did not help gain voter support for a raise."Oliver thought the police wage increase campaign might have been improved. For one thing, the police campaigned at large, using the mass media, rather than targeting on their known supporters. The style of the police campaign seemed to convey a threat of slow-downs or cutback in services if they did not get the raise. Thirdly, the pay raise ordinance was complicated and difficult for the public to understand. "We were trying to get the nations's fourth largest city," said Oliver,"to agree to a tax increase, when the whole world wants a tax cut!" Oliver said it was important in the future to see the difference between uniformed city employees: "The firefighters aren't arresting anybody. They are out there saving lives. They have a five minute response time,compared to the 30 minute, response time of the police. But it is f not possible to make that distinction the voters." Oliver will be campaign manager for Mickey Leland and Fred Daley's fall campaigns. Campaign headquarters will open soon.Oliver is completing his 18th year as minister of Plymouth United Congregational Church of Christ in Beaumont, and does election campaigns "avocationally", he says, adding "The church has been very tolerant of me." His most memorable moment, in a crowded career, was the Appreciation Dinner given him by political groups in Beaumont. Eight hundred people showed up in April at the new Beaumont Civic Center, including Andrew Young, Sarah Weddington, Jack Brooks and Mickey Leland. "We had a lot of fun," recalls Oliver. "The biggest fun was that the civic center is Beaumont's newest white elephant, and they never had that black a crowd all over the place, paying the bill." tion and career development programs. The survey shows that a great majrity of city employees hope to advance in their jobs, and feel restless when they don't, but think Big Jim McConn is Dada Nada as far as helping them get ahead. Tinsley's report, based on a study by graduate student, Goldie Waghalter, says that most of the career development programs mandated by federal law are unknown to lower echelon workers because the information just isn't being passed along. gainst the "closet abortionist" Spock, a "running doc," acoording to one of his critics. Council member Eleanor Tinsley finds, in her August 1980 study of women and advancement in government careers, that a majority of city employees remain uninformed about Houston Affirmative Ac- Baby doctor Benjamin Spock will be the featured speaker at the ACLU fundraiser at Lt. Gov. Bill Hobby's little shack on South Boulevard in November. Local right to life groups see a chance for putting a little spice in the civil libertarians' usual menu of unsalted popcorn. They plan protests and a media campaign a- Marie M.Oser, who founded the Texas Institute for Families in Houston in 1975, will be executive director of the 1981 White House Conference on Children and Youth. The 1981 conference, date to be announced, will focus mainly on the impact of institutions, employment and culture on children and youth. Oser, who will work with Health and Human Services director Patricia Roberts Harris, will arrange presentations and invitations for the conference and be responsible for a comprehensive report to the President and to the public. Interestingly, these two reports will be very different-a brief summary is what the White House wants now, and the public will probably be inte rested in major presentations in full. If Reagan is elected, the White House report will probably be even shorter. AFFAIRS The Jim Love opening at the Rice Museum was a stately riot involving 600 patrons and admirers of the life-form and machine tool sculptor.Love, who cowered in a corner at the opening, said he had named the show "Jim Love Up To Now" because "calling it a retrospective sounds too much like an obituary." Outside, his Trojan Bear, the lovable wooden animal which has been the only link between the Museum of Fine Arts and the Contemporary Arts Museum for the past few years, smiled happily as it settled into its home haunts. Inside, Dominique de Menil was greeting people like Liz Weingarten at the door, David Crossley was snapping pictures, and the wall to wall crowd was snacking on Jarlsburg and Vouvray. Jane Collings and John Techman arrived on a motorcycle. Mrs. de Menil wore a simple black with silver jewelry, the artist a pair of baggy brown Levis, but many in the crowd were fancied out, including one couple dressed punk. The woman, Judy Fun- derburk displayed a pair of cut-off leopard skin cowboy boots, artfully made into clogs, full Rocky Horror makeup, and an enormous safety pin holding her silk-rag blouse together. The curator of the Museum, Heidi Renteria, who wore an orchid as large as a head of cabbaged surprise gift from her husband, artist Philip Renteria), said "It was a nice reunion of friends of the artist and friends of the art. Love's work has a gen tleness that makes everyone smile." The show continues until November 16. On the wall of the ex-KA shell, note the motto, "Dieu et Les Dames." Out Basket: Don's Oyster Bar between Baba Yega and the Mining Company died, as did Sorena's Restaurant on Alabama. Don's had a thick, decent gumbo and the Cajun cooks are now headed back to Lafayette; Sorena's had a clean salad, unusual for the neighborhood. There'll be no more beer busts at the Kappa Alpha fraternity house on Chelsea and Montrose, either. The ole animal house was not only wrecked by this "Confederate" fraternity, but the bills didn't get paid. The door's open, if you want to see a trashed-out wreck of a former mansion, just across the street from those absurd little pill box $100,000 condos that replaced a drug store and medical offices. In Basket: Down the street is the shadowy figure of "The King of Montrose," Steve Zimmermann, Zimmermann Enterprises, once a professor at St. Thomas University, with a weakness, among others, for modified guillotine steel sculpture. Zimm's backing John Anderson in the upcoming turkey trot, and seems to be raising his own profile among his Montrose constituents. You will know Zimm's Wine Bar, by its valiant little umbrellas nudging the neigboring Steak 'N Eggs greasewall exterior on Montrose near Richmond. Don Hill, the manager, says, "Houston is getting increasingly sophisticated in its tastes for wine. The demand here means we can get some rare wines in bulk, such as 1974 California Cabernet Sauvignon." Zimm's has a $1500 bottle of 1898 Lafitte or 1924 La Tour for the hard-to- please, the best California from $15-37 a bottle, and samples of the decent wines at $2-3. Aside from the large wine, beer and water selection manager Hill touts a light, crisp menu of pates, meat and cheese platters, smoked salmon, and quiches for $3.50 and under, and cheesecake imported from Arno's of New Orleans, all lunch specialities. The decor is elegant, intimate, and Hill reports rising popularity: "The Steak 'N Eggs customers passing by just add to the atmosphere. That's Montrose." Another Zimm venture is La Colombe d'Or (the Golden Dove). The hotel is only four blocks down Montrose from Steak 'N Eggs, but it might as well be on another planet. Emilee Lake, director of hotel operations and sales, says the accomodations at this palatial pension are out of this world. So are the prices. For a terrestrial $152-200 per evening, guests will enjoy the sight of about $15,000 worth of antiques in their suites. The hotel, formerly the old Fondren mansion at 3400 Montrose, had been up for sale for 1.2 million, but now it's going to be the city's first luxury flophouse — room for 80, a French nouvelle menu, port and cognac served in the restored library. The house, built in 1923, is already an important part of Houston's history. (Fondren was the founder of what became Exxon). The public can partake of the gourmet cooking, which will be a fixed menu changing seasonally. Costs will run $20 per head at lunch and dinner, and there'll be a big Sunday brunch. "We're going to have a 'soft opening' in mid- October," said director Lake, "and then a victory party in November." The Trojan Bear, a work by local sculptor Jim Love, passed in front of the Glassell School as it left its location across from the Museum HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH of Fine Arts (left inset) recently to go to the Rice Museum (right inset) where Love is having a major retrospective. (See story) SEPTEMBER Benny Boyle, manager of Lucky- burger, Mandell at Richmond, came back into business because his landlord asked him to. There was a lot of community heat about it as well, rumors of a picket-petition drive to reopen the place, after it was shut four months ago in a rent-raise dispute. "The first thing I did toward reopening," said Boyle, " was a no-no. I painted that big barrel on top of the place grey and green. It used to be orange, and everybody around here would tell their visitors, 'Oh just turn left at that big orange barrel.' When we painted it, people got all mixed up and they came to me and said 'Oh man you just got to paint it back.' So now the huge wooden ornament is oranger than the University of Texas after a football game with Rice. Luckyburger's pinball machines and jukebox, however, have gone the way of the Susan B. Anthony com and the Luckyburger shrimp basket. Boyle is now concentrating on his half- pound $2 burger and his Hungry Farmer