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Houston Breakthrough, September 1980
Page 5
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Houston Breakthrough, September 1980 - Page 5. September 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 28, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6063.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1980). Houston Breakthrough, September 1980 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6063

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, September 1980 - Page 5, September 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 28, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6082/show/6063.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, September 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 30 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
File Name femin_201109_563e.jpg
Transcript WHWVl.Uti FREE AT LAST! "/ never heard anyone call it a depression. People went around saying it was simply hard times." — recollections of a man who grew up during the 30s from Studs Terkel's Hard Times When we were growing up, people called it The Great Depression. Depression stories replaced fairy tales as folklore. Both had the same ending: we would all live happily ever after. Those who lived through the 30s, survivors like our parents, gave a false sense of security to their children. We grew up thankful to be born during World War II and not a decade earlier. The war came just in the nick of time. It brought jobs and television. We could now see how well off we were as a nation. Just as modern medicine wiped out a virus or two, we thought we had this depression thing all but licked. Of course, we're not in a depression, Ronald Reagan notwithstanding. But these tales from the 30s are hitting a little closer to home. Enterprises like this newspaper have always been accustomed to hard times. Rubberneckers by trade, we've watched a lot of better-funded publications bite the dust over the last five years. If we were in it only for the money, we would have, too. A 32-page paper with an average of three pages of ads is a rare bird maybe, but hardly the goose that lays gilt-edged securities. But it's an ill wind, et cetera, and one positive, delightful result of our economic setbacks has been that we are finally going to do something that we should have done a long time ago. Starting with this issue, Breakthrough will be free at newsstands and other distribution points. We've ak/vays advocated free speech, so here it is. Instead of passing on our escalating costs to our subscribers, we decided to build our advertising revenue. The best way to do that is to make the paper as visible as possible. Advertisers always ask how the paper is distributed. In the past we've had to say, "Almost exclusively through the mail." This isn't New York*City with a newsstand on every corner, you know. Those outlets that Would carry a monthly paper were spread around the city—both expensive and time-consuming to service. Those who refused to carry it did so mainly because they thought people would walk off with it. We hardly look like the Green Sheet or other ad rags sprouting like weeds around town, but we were competing for counter space, nevertheless. For the first few months, we will circulate the paper in the areas of our greatest subscription strength-the Mont- rose-River Oaks, Heights and downtown areas. As our advertising allows, we will increase our print run and the areas of distribution. We will continue the mailing service for paid subscribers with no increase in rates. In fact, we will continue to send the paper to those of you who are currently paid subscribers for a year beyond your expiration date. Any renewals received before November 30 will also get the one-year bonus. We have never had the resources to give our circulation the attention it deserves—we've always been too busy trying to put out a quality paper. We hope that now, with the potential for a vastly increased circulation, we will be able to bring you an even better newspaper. Pass the word. Breakthrough is free, free at last. We warmly welcome Morris Edelson as our newest editor. (Now we are four). You have been seeing his byline on many Breakthrough stories, including three recent cover stories: "Sharon Itaya: Tough on Toxics "(April ), "Richard Murray: Wizard of Odds" (July/August) and this month's series of stories on the economy. He was on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin and a Fulbright Scholar and most recently retired from The New York Times' Houston bureau. This month, Dr. Edelson succumbs to his secret vice — gossip — in his new Local Color column. Dr. Edelson takes his inspiration from Addison and Steele, with a nod to Juvenal and Catullus, and he says, "Local color is the ticker tape of society, history written on a paper towel." His busy pencil running back and forth across the city will reveal an underlying pattern as intricate and appealing a a brass rubbing. A welcome to Houston to Zippy who debuts in this month's comix section (see facing page). Zippy is a free spirit and "tends not to stay on the subject," says his creator, Bill Griffiths (Mother Jones, Sept/Oct 1980). "He has the technique of a TV commercial — he does one disconnecting thing after another." • At the moment, Zippy is running for President under the slogan, "Am I Elected Yet?" Thanks to Jane Collings who introduced us to Zippy. Jane was our Antioch intern this summer and there was a good bit of Zip in her, too. We will miss her. She has to go back to school this fall, but look for her byline next month on film, her first love. And, David Crossley - great photos and lay out! For a still photographer, he's always in motion. Jane calls him Dashing David because when he comes into the production room, copy takes wings. Things get done. And the staff perks up. "He appreciates genius," says Jane. "He laughs at my jokes. That about zips it up . . . - Janice Blue and Gabrielle Cosgriff % PHOTO COPY INC The short run FULL COLOR printing you've been waiting for . . . SERVICE PHOTO COPY, INC. is now offering its new exclusive COLOR Q process in Houston . . . true vibrant color at unbelievable prices . . . COLOR Q by SERVICE PHOTO COPY, INC. . . . the answer for: modeling/talent composites, art gallery cards, post cards, business cards, posters, real estate, catalog sheets, promotional literature, sales presentations, manual inserts, and show specials. For more information on how COLOR Q can work for you. Contact Douglas Stewart, Urban Sales Representative. ■M i #U#f - ' Te*M 7700G 7/^l32i 2?&< l-IOUSI: 01= C:OI=l=l=l= MEANS Where women make policy and coffee! 2520 Rice Blvd. In the Village 524-0057 10-6/Mon-Fri 10-5/Sat Closed Sun SEPTEMBER