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Pointblank Times [1975]
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Pointblank Times [1975] - Page 1. [1975]. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 11, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5654/show/5644.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

([1975]). Pointblank Times [1975] - Page 1. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5654/show/5644

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times [1975] - Page 1, [1975], Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 11, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5654/show/5644.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Pointblank Times [1975]
Date [1975]
Description Vol. 1 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 10 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_405a.jpg
Transcript pointblank times a lesbian/feminist publication Vol.1 No.l Plain Brown Wrapper: The Lesbian in Modern Novels by Amanda Lesbians have traditionally played such insignificant and obscure parts in literature that any discussion of lesbianism in novels centers around only a small armload of books. A somewhat larger selection of books includes or features male homosexuals (works by Proust, Gide, Genet, Forster, et al.), but currently only tran- sexuals and transvestites have less fictional representation than do lesbians. Until recently, the few and only sources of lesbiana were mediocre-to trashy tales written ^y men for the erotic satisfaction of other men; examples of this sort of purple prose an be found in publications such as "True Confessions" and "Modern Romance". With only a few exceptions, the lesbian characterization was at best caricature and at worst grossly overdone fantasy, as shown by the prevalence of the macho-butch and fluffy- femme in the lesbian role repertoire. dom dis- , nor did y, however, the actual d percep- he subjects Women authors, themselves a rare breed in the literary field, cussed their own erotic feelings toward or their experiences with other won they present lesbians in any other than minor and stereotypical roles. Late an increasing number of women have begun introducing us to lesbians, not from or assumed vantage point of heterosexuality, but from their own background < tions. What these perceptions are and what type of fiction they create are of this discussion, but first, a flashback... 1ea,inq Prior to the twentieth century, most writers dealing with home presented only sex and/or love between men. Just as straight women and t\ were not taken seriously by men, so too were lesbians dismissed as nature' From Greek and Roman writers through the Bloomsbury group (Virginia Woolf ar until the present, male writers glorified the beauty of the masculine physi erotic and aesthetic nature of love between men. Women writers, because of oppression as women and artists, seldom had the time*'money, or the means be published. Social pressure, which progressed from extreme to mildly n the passage of time, dictated simplistic plot, stock characters, an uplifti a moral that loudly and clearly proclaimed that the good women were those v^ and raised a family and the bad {i.e. those who strayed from this path) wen miserable existences. Few authors, male or female, dared break these liter and risk social censure by dealing with homoeroticism in a positive manner uality sexuality ittle jokes. friends) e and the heir double rite and ictive with tone, and married Idoomed to conventions A Conditions changed in the early decades of the twentieth centur and 30's, in particular, were to the expatriate artists living in Europe wha* were claimed to be for Americans: a time of social and political upheaval and artistic experimentation. And, to the extent that authors were not onl also displaying that they were sexual beings, the 20's and 30's proved to t for literary lesbians. ~*&t JP -v f ^(Jertrude Stein, whose relationship with Alice B. Toklas , misunderstood only by the most adamant of heterosexists, was openly recording her insights into same-sex relationships in Fernhurst and Q.E.D.: ^Things As They 4m,^Wtalie Barney and Renee Vivien were lesbian poets whose excitfi&kanci: explicit love pwi^/ifotrigued their contemporaries almost as much as did their personal lives (see Colette's The Pure and the Impure and Anais Nin's Diaries). Paris-born Violette LeDuc was experiencing the event which would become Ravages and La Batavde* while in Britain Radclyffe Hall was combatting pornography charges and the critics' outrage because of her autobiographical novel. The WelM of Loneliness. The 1920's the 1960's i of literary dmitting but golden age (and was)