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Broadside 1971-03
Pages 6 and 7
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Broadside 1971-03 - Pages 6 and 7. March, 1971. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5546/show/5540.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March, 1971). Broadside 1971-03 - Pages 6 and 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5546/show/5540

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside 1971-03 - Pages 6 and 7, March, 1971, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5546/show/5540.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Broadside 1971-03
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date March, 1971
Description Vol. 2 No. 3
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
Item Description
Title Pages 6 and 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_094f.jpg
Transcript Resolutions proposing an equal rights amendment have been introduced in every Congress since 1923* The latest one is the Equal Rights Amendment which has just been introduced in the Senate and in the House of Representatives of the 92nd Congress 1st session. Senators Birch Bayh(D.-Ind.)and Marlow Cook(R.-Ky.) introduced it as Senate Joint Resolution 8 and 9. Representative Martha Griffiths(D.-Mich.Untroduced it in the House as House Joint Resolution 208. Both resolutions have been referred to the Judiciary Committees of their respective bodies. Adoption of the amendment would require a 2/3 vote of both houses of Congress and ratification by 3/k of the States. The proposed amendment states: "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex." The purpose of the amendment is to clarify the legal status of women which has not been defined by the Federal Constitution and varies from State to State. The original Constitution, founded on the English Common Law, gave no recognition to women as legal "persons." Although the 14th amendment forbids the taking of life, liberty, or property without due process of law and extends the equal protection of laws to every person, it, like all other provisions to the Constitution, means what the Supreme Court interprets it to mean. There has been no 14th amendment case alleging discrimination on account of sex in which the Supreme Court has held that a law classifying persons on the basis of sex Is unreasonable and therefore unconstitutional. The Supreme Court has extended the lath's provisions to include as "persons" corporations, juveniles, schoolchildren, and criminals. Women are not "persons" and therefore are not granted "equal protection of the laws" guaranteed to all men by the 14th amendment. The only constitutional recognition extended to women is the 19th amendment Insuring the right to vote without regard to sex. If the Equal Rights Amendment is ratified, some of the things it will do are: declare unconstitutional state laws limiting and restricting the hiring and employment of female workers or prohibiting women from working in certain occupations; guarantee women and girls admission to publicly supported educational institutions under the same standards as men and boys; place the burden of proving the reasonableness of disparate treatment on the basis of sex on the United States or the State rather than making the individual discriminated against show the unreasonableness of the discrimination; require equal opportunity in employment of the Federal, State, and local governments; make the welfare of the child become the primary criterion rather than the automatic preference to the woman. Women would assume, within their means, equal responsibility for alimony and support of children; and obligate women to military service but not require them to serve functions for which they are not fitted, anymore than men are so required. The 1970 Equal Rights Amendment was defeated in the Senate by crippling amendments proposed by Senator Ervin(D.-N.C.)to permit exempting women from the draft and by Senator Baker(R.-Tenn.)to attach the "prayer" amendment. Hard work must be done if the 1971 Equal Rights Amendment is to be ratified. We do not yet have the votes to win. We must get them. Write your Senators and Representatives urging them to vote for the Equal Rights Amendment. If you don't know your Congressmen, call Betty Barnes at GR-2-3316 after 5:00p.m. for their names and addresses. It is deplorable that In this year of 1971 in a country founded on democratic ideals one half of its population is denied the fundamental rights to life,liberty,property, and equal protection of the laws. More than a decade has passed since an equal rights amendment to the Texas constitution was first proposed. This year the Texas Equal Legal Rights Amendment was passed unanimously by the Senate. On February 231 following a hearing in Austin, the ELRA was referred to a "friendly" subcommittee of the House Constitutional Amendments Committee. Over 100 women from across the state heard Hermine Tobolowsky, legislative chairman and past president of Texas Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs, urge the committee to "Make every law in this state apply exactly the same way to every citizen in this state. Give the citizens of Texas the right to vote on this amendment." "It is a travesty on justice," Ms. Tobolowsky argued, "that when Texas passed its first civil rights act in I967. women were excluded. They are still excluded." Hawthorne Phillips, judge of 107th District Court and former executive assistant to the Texas Attorney General, also spoke in favor of the amendment. He urged the committee to "enable the people of the state to express their own beliefs and their own ideas about equal protection under the law." The proposed amendment reads: "Equality under the law shall not be denied or abridged because of sex, race, creed, color or national origin." Representative Rex Braun of Houston, sponsor of the bill, is optimistic about the passage of the bill if"it is not killed in committee. "I have 110 committed votes. One hundred are needed for passage," he said. "It is long past due that the women of Texas have equal rights with men. We can't call ourselves a 20th century legislature if we fail to pass this bill." If the bill passes it will be presented to Texas voters in the 1972 general election. Although a number of discriminatory laws were repealed in the 1967 session of the legislature, many remain on the books. The amendment not only would remove these laws, it would ensure no discriminatory laws could be re-enacted. Section 109 of the Probate Code states that if the parents live together, the father is the natural guardian of the minor children during marriage. Because of the wording of this statute, doctors usually refuse to perform surgery and often hospitals refuse to accept a child unless the father's consent is obtained. This statute allows the father to put a child in an institution without the mother's consent. The mother as well as the father should be the guardian of the child. Article 5172 in the Texas Statutes (regarding work hours for women) is included in a list of statutes headed "For the Protection of Females." It actually handicaps them because it prevents women who do certain kinds of work from getting overtime pay for more than an hour or two a day. The statute does not prevent her from working 24 hours— it only prevents one employer from having her work more than the specified time. She can work eight additional hours a day for another employer which to him would not be overtime and deserving of overtime pay. Article 46l8 regarding homesteads does not have the word abandoned in it. Court decisions have upheld the right of the husband alone to abandon the homestead and sell it without the wife's consent. Penal Code Article 1220 states that homicide is justifiable when committed by the husband upon one taken in the act of adultery with his wife. This article needs to be repealed, thus making the husband subject to a murder charge the same as the wife is now should she kill one engaging in adultery with her husband. Murder should be murder. The Equal Legal Rights Amendment must be passed. A vote for the women of this state can be delayed no longer. Equal treatment for women and men under the law is an idea whose time has come.