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Broadside, March 1971
Page 4
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Broadside, March 1971 - Page 4. March 1971. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 26, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5546/show/5538.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1971). Broadside, March 1971 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5546/show/5538

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, March 1971 - Page 4, March 1971, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 26, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5546/show/5538.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Broadside, March 1971
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date March 1971
Description Vol. 2 No. 3
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 4
File name femin_201109_094d.jpg
Transcript HISTORY MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT by Betty Barnes Mary Wollstonecraft was an early English feminist who shocked the public by her unorthodox behavior as well as by her unorthodox ideas concerning woman's place. Mary was born in London April 27,1759. Her father was a drunkard and Mary had a miserable childhood. After working as a companion and then as a seamstress for a few years, Mary and her sister Eliza opened a school. The school lasted only two years, failing in 1785. Mary then became a governess, but was fired a year later because the children's mother felt they loved Mary too much. Settling in London, Mary became a literary hack for a publisher, reading manuscripts , writing for magazines, and translating from French and German. She obtained the job through her literary talents, already evident in two easays,"Wrongs of Women" and "Thoughts on the Education of Daughters,'' as well as a novel, Mary. In 1790, partly as a result of her acquaintance with Thomas Paine, Mary published A Vindication of the Rights of Men. Two years later she published A Vindication of the Rights of Women. This latter work is considered her best. In it she attacked the philosophy that woman was formed to please man and could govern him by apparent submission and actual cunning:. This, Mary said, "is the philosophy of lasciviousness." She argued that wonen should be educated equally with men and that women "must only bow to the authority of reason, instead of being the modest slaves of opinion." Modest though her requests were (free schools; education of women), they caused an uproar. Ignoring public opinion, Mary went to Paris in December,1792, to view the French Revolution firsthand. There she met Gilbert Imlay, an American. Mary 'disapproved of marriage and the two lived together for a few years. Mary helped Imlay in his affairs, even traveling to Norway for him. In 1794, Mary had a daughter. Imlay and Mary separated in 1795. April 27, 1759- September 10, 1797 In 1796, back in London, Mary met William Godwin, an English writer. They decided to marry when Mary was three months pregnant, only for the sake of the child. This child was to be Mary Godwin Shelley, author of Frankenstein. On September 10, 1797, ten days after the birth of this second daughter, Mary Wollstonecraft died at the age of 38. She would have been bitter indeed if she had known that future literary reference works would list her under "Godwin" rather than her real name. sex prejudice has been the chief hindrance in the rapid advance of the woman's rights movement to its present status, and it is still a stupendous obstacle to be overcome. This world taught woman nothing skillful and then said her work was valueless. It permitted her no opinions and said she did not know how to think. It forbade her to speak in public, and said the sex had no orators. It denied her the schools, and said the sex had no genius. It robbed her of every vestige of responsibility, and then called her weak. It taught her that every pleasure must come as a favor from men, and when to gain it she decked herself in paint and fine feathers, as she had been taught to do, it called her vain. -Carrie Chapman Catt, 1902