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Houston Breakthrough 1980-05
Page 28
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 28. May 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 29, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5529.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 28. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5529

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 28, May 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 29, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5529.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-05
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 28
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_560az.jpg
Transcript Beads for hair braiding available in an assortment of colors & styles. AB€ftD/HOP 24 76 Times Blvd. 5239350 BOOKSHOP Specializing in English and Foreign Books & Magazines MONDAY-SATURDAY 10-6 2272 W. Holcombe (Corner of Greenbriar) (713)668-0075 915 RICHMOND AVE. HOUSTON. TEXAS JACKSON 6-2691 need no other guides but that one," says Dr. Cork. Teri DuBuisson, a counselor at Houston International, says simply "for an alcoholic, one drink is too many and a thousand is not enough." A good example of this is Ann. After her first drink, she was a full-time drunk. "I was in high school and I went out with a bunch of kids. Somebody had a pint of Jack Daniels and they were mixing it. When I got a taste, I loved it. I started drinking right out of the bottle. I remember that everybody got mad at me for drinking it all. I blacked out that night. "By the time I was a junior in high school I had a reputation for being a big drinker. By age 21 I began to worry about my drinking. When I'd drink I'd get kind of wild and uninhibited. That was the purpose of it for me. It gave me a personality I didn't have when I was sober. I slept around with men I really didn't want to be with. I felt physically sick ail the time. My drinking pattern was one night on, one night off so that I could get rid of my hangovers and be able to keep working. Because I was getting along in business, I really thought I couldn't have a problem." Gina echoes some of these same myths. "I had a job I was good at. I never missed work because of a hangover and I only drank beer. I knew I couldn't bean alcoholic because alcoholics were the bottom of the barrel. I was a responsible person so I couldn't be like them. Ha, what a joke that was." All four women say friends helped them realize their problems and that one person recommended Alcoholics Anonymous and saw to it that they went to their first meeting. Some liked it immediately, others didn't, but all stuck it out for one reason or another. Ann tells of how people reacted to her quitting: "When I finally began to admit my problem, all my friends and family helped minimize my drinking. They'd say 'Sure, you're a lush, sure you're moody, sure you're crazy and screwed up—but it's because you're talented, not because you're an alcoholic' "I remember one company I worked for, we laughed about how you had to be an alcoholic to work there. My boss actually told me that I'd lose my talent if I quit drinking. Well, it's just not true. My thinking is clearer and my work is better since I quit drinking." All four women say they were fortunate to have had help in quitting. They realize many alcoholics are not so lucky. Many lose jobs and families, others end up in jail or institutionalized. "When I think of how lucky I am I can't believe it," says Gina. "I still have great kids. I've put them through so much and somehow they turned out to be the most fantastic people on earth anyway. Also, my true friends have stuck by me. I'm having honest fun. I'm feeling anger and emotions that I never felt before. I know that I shut out a lot of hurt and pain with my drinking but, God, I shut out all the good feelings too. I never had sex sober before. And it's so wonderful now." The women all credit AA for their sobriety. "When I was on the way to my first meeting I had this vision—six feet tall creatures with long green tongues waiting to attack me," says Gina. "I was belligerent as hell the first three meetings I went to. Now they all tease me about it. They are the most beautiful people. They come from all different backgrounds but when they come to those meetings they're just alcoholics trying to stay sober." Dr. Cork is a whole-hearted believer in AA. "We're very bigoted toward AA here at Houston International. The emphasis of AA is honesty. Most people go to look for sobriety and end up with a way of life. "There are many, many AA groups. There are groups for non-smokers, professionals, blacks and Spanish-speaking. Everybody can find a group they're comfortable with." However, she doesn't approve of groups that use a base other than AA. "If it splinters from AA then it's not good. There is no easier, softer way to sobriety. When people come to Houston Interna tional with drinking problems, we try to get them to 90 meetings in 90 days. It's a tough program. We're not here to collect their insurance, we're here to get them sober and keep them sober. We don't want to see them back again." AA works on the principles of "The 12 Steps." The steps begin with admitting the problem then dealing with the emotional and spiritual aspects. "I know this will get us bad press," says Dr. Cork, "but one of the most important things about AA is its belief in spirituality. Not necessarily a God figure, but belief in a higher being. Some people use the group as their higher being and that's fine." Patrice said that if she'd known she was going to have to develop a religious feeling at her first meeting, she would have left and never come back. But, she says, "I found out I could develop a spirituality I was comfortable with. I grew up a Roman Catholic and hated it. But now I have a sense of hope in my life I didn't have before." "When I get pompous and caught up in a loose, secular world, those Smirnoff ads just jump out at me," says Carla. "Most of the compulsion has left me but I can tell when I don't take care of myself spiritually." Carla says she is still grappling with her powerlessness in society. Before her suicide attempt she felt totally out of control. "The moment I swallowed those drugs, I felt powerful. At last I was in total control of my body. I was euphoric." From that overdose to today, it's been a long road for Carla. The road to sobriety has been hard on all the women. Yet, the camaraderie they speak of and the spirituality they've reached have strengthened them. They all live their lives on the AA creed, "One Day At a Time." "I'm living for the moment, one day at a time," says Carla. "I'm taking life for what it is and using it to the fullest. Now that's powerful." Sandy Long works with the Houston Area Women's Center. BREAKTHROUGH ON THE AIR KPFT-FM90.1 28 (Left to right) Marilyn French, author of The Women's Room, joins Margie Glaser, Nancy Lane Fleming, and Rita Saylors in an interview that will air Wednesday, May 7 on KPFT.90 FM at 6:30 p.m. Breakthrough on the Air is now is now 60 minutes of conversation and women's music. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH