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Houston Breakthrough 1980-05
Page 24
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 24. May 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5525.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 24. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5525

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 24, May 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5525.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-05
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 24
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_560av.jpg
Transcript UPSTAIRS, DOWNSTAIRS Living and working under the same roof BY IMELDA DYKES Cottage industries were common during colonial times. No one could argue the fact that women worked in the home. They controlled not only their working environment but the market economy. During the industrialized Victorian era, architect Leslie Kane Weisman says we saw an end to all that. "Women were no longer the manufacturers. We developed the gender split between masculine/work and domesticity or feminine/non-work." Women's skills became 19th century skills. We weren't trained in the new technology. We became the "orphans of the technological age." Changes took place in architecture, as well. We lost those all-purpose spaces in front of the hearth and got cubby-holed into rooms — women got kitchens and men got the master bedroom and everything else. Weisman collects drawings of women's environmental fantasies and finds "signs of neglected and unfulfilled needs." There are more windows, fewer rooms, more attempts to bring nature in. One of her drawings showed a simple Tree-House which branched out to include space to eat, read, sleep and, at the very top, to look out at the view. Breakthrough lives downstairs in a house with over 50 windows and an attached green house (under construction). We became intrigued about other Houston women who live and work in the same environment. Writer Imelda Dykes talks to some of them about their present-day cottage industries. — J. B. When Ellen O'Bryan opened her shop, Natural Magic, people told her she'd make more money in a shopping center. But she believes a homey environment is necessary for her products. O'Bryan lives upstairs over her shop which is located in the Village. It carries Natural Magic cosmetics, body lotions and other potions made from organic ingredients. The primary reason she chose the building was because the upstairs bathroom had two full-length windows. O'Bryan's friends often drop by her shop. "My house revolves around Natural Magic being here," says O'Bryan. Marion Coleman is a printer who owns House of Coleman on West Alabama. She also lives upstairs over her printing shop. "I wanted to deal with the individual on an individual level. I thought in a home atmosphere, the kind of atmosphere I created, I could do that. It's definitely home. A lot of times I run upstairs and cook a snack for a hungry customer. I could never work in a warehouse. I could never work in an enclosed area. I'd rather dig ditches," says Coleman. "Really it's the House of Coleman. My friends named my business. I started with the idea that I would eventually get a house. I really want to be around my work." Coleman's devotion to her work meant 14 to 16 hours each day for four to five years. She readily admits she loves her work and spent more money fixing the business area although the upstairs is very comfortable. "I have a tree-room. I have no curtains, drapes or shades up anywhere except my bedroom. I can look out at the trees . . . and I'm surrounded by trees," says Coleman. Connie Moberly designed her photography studio/home. Five years ago, Moberly was renting space on Fleetwood Street but got a notice to move within 60 days. She'd already bought land and had had an architect design a place, a place she couldn't afford. She sat down with a pencil and draft paper and designed one she could afford and one that would fit her lifestyle. "I was scared . . . but I pat myself on the back now." Her living space is so well integrated with her work space that the IRS had trouble finding her bedroom. She thinks of her lifestyle as "a wrap-around. It's everything—fun, work, money . . . and mischief. An office environment would be too confining. If I have something I want to do on Tuesday that wasn't a rule on Monday, I just change the rule. The visual environment is mostly white. You can't control that at most jobs—what colors you work around, what kind of lighting you have or what you wear. "I also chose the location so it would be centralized, inside the loop, so I don't have to drive. I hand-picked everything that's in it," Moberly says. Both Coleman and Moberly have people working for them and feel that careful consideration is necessary when hiring people. As Moberly says, "People you work with have to be people you can essentially live with, you spend so many hours with them." Coleman says most of her employees have been with her several years. Coming to Houston from a hometown of 35 people, dulcimer maker Sharon Lauder returned to the country. Lauder began making dulcimers six years ago and hopes to make it a full-time career. She also teaches dulcimer music, performs and writes music and teaches handicapped children. After two years in Houston, Lauder decided to make her dulcimers and teach her students in her home at the dead end of a dirt road near Conroe. "The atmosphere is just not the same as in Houston. I'm not busy doing city life running. "I have breakfast looking out at the pine trees, thinking about the dulcimers in all their various stages." Lauder works simultaneously on about five instruments in different stages. "I can pick and choose what area I want to work in. I also work outside. The sun helps me check things out—like sanding—to give the wood a silky finish." Continued on page 26 THE BOOKSTORE 1728 Bissonnet • Houston 77005 • 713 527-8522 yk^u^ Lcn> '2*yCf^-- Fine feminist books and magazines including P 2/ Heresies, Chrysalis, Woman Spirit and Women Artists News /fr*^*^ && 24 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH