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Houston Breakthrough, May 1980
Page 22
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Houston Breakthrough, May 1980 - Page 22. May 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 29, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5523.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1980). Houston Breakthrough, May 1980 - Page 22. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5523

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, May 1980 - Page 22, May 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 29, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5523.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, May 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Texas
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 22
File Name femin_201109_560at.jpg
Transcript CAMPAIGN '80 The Railroad Commission Texas Railroad Commission, of course is a quaint misnomer. With its 660 staff members and $17 million annual budget, the commission regulates production of 30 percent of the nation's oil and 34 percent of its natural gas. Last year, the state output came to 978,544,145 barrels of oil and 7,077 trillion cubic feet of gas. The commission also oversees the state's rapidly growing mining of lignite coal and uranium. It regulates the trucking industry. And from time to time, it even does what it was set up to do back in 1891: it regulates the railroad system in Texas.-Peter Applebome, The New York Times. Breakthrough: Why are you running for Texas Railroad Commissioner? Jim Hightower: Several reasons. First, the office itself, the Texas Railroad Commission has the power to help people, in a pocketbook sense, more than any other government agency in Texas. It can do something for people directly—regulate utility rates or even create a renewable energy industry. It's an office worth fighting for. The second reason is to show politicians, office holders, and statewide candidates that you can run against the monied establishment and win. To show that this is not a right-wing state and, at least on the pocketbook issues, it is a populist state and its people are far more progressive than our politicians or our press. MONEY TALKS BT: The New York Times noted that "in 1978, virtually every statewide race was won by the candidate with the most money." What chance do you really have of winning? JH: Frankly, that worries me. We'll be out- spent by about three to one. The race depends on the effectiveness of my "get out the vote" vs. Nugent's TV ads. (James E. Nugent, first- term incumbent and veteran conservative legislator, is Hightower's opponent.) Nugent knows where he's vulnerable and where I've attacked Jim Hightower, former editor of Texas Observer. THE RIGHT TRACK Big Jim takes on Big oil him. He's trying to put a gauze over that in his TV spots. He's adopted my rhetoric, claiming to be a consumer candidate. Some polls indicate that I'm beating him, but polls don't say who's going to turn out. BT: What are your proposals for the office? JH: As for utility rates, I've specifically described what I would not allow: the add-on's, for example. These additionsare passed on to the the consumer-advertising charges, 85-100 percent fuel charges, fees for lawyers hired to get rate increases, and a policy that allows a rate increase to be assessed retroactively-l would fight-and vote-against all those. BY JUDITH RICHARDS I've also proposed fairly specific renewable energy programs ... to try out wind, sun and grain power. I'm also concerned about strip mining: How does it affect the topsoil? How does it affect the water supply? How does it affect the small towns where strip mining occurs? As for trucking, Nugent and those guys run around mouthing the Texas Motor Transport Association cliche: 'The Texas trucking industry is the envy of the nation." If they went out to the countryside, they'd learn right away that it is not the envy of Texans. There are thousands of independent truckers who can't get into business because of the commission's favoritism towards big trucking monopolies. There are thousands of small-town merchants who are very angry because they can't get delivery from central freight lines and other companies that the railroad commission protects. THE SECRET AGENCY BT: Are the commission hearings open to the public? JH: Yes. They have to be under the state open meeting and open record laws. The notice in the Texas Register tells you when they're 22 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH