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Houston Breakthrough 1980-05
Page 18
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 18. May 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 11, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5519.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 18. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5519

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 18, May 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 11, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5519.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-05
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 18
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_560ap.jpg
Transcript CAMPAIGN '80 The State Senate TAKING ON OGG The Waters challenge: the last sting of The Killer Bees BY VALERIE J.MORRIS Jack Ogg is running scared. He's facing his strongest opponent since Gertrude Barnstone ran against him for the State Senate District 15 seat in 1972. Now, Texas State Representative Ron Waters is taking on Ogg. The two legislators clashed during the last session over the presidential primary bill whose passage was aborted by the flight of the Killer Bees. Ogg sponsored the primary bill in the Senate, with the backing of both Lt. Gov. Bill Hobby and House Speaker Billy Clayton, but incurred the wrath of the Bees and Waters. Valerie Morris is a free lance writer. The bill called for separate, rather than same-day primaries. Republicans would vote on April 1 and Democrats on May 3, a situation that would have invited crossover voting and allowed conservative Democrats to vote for John Connally in April and Jack Ogg in May. Waters co-sponsored the House same- day (May 3) primary bill. The defeat of the Ogg measure led Waters to believe a victory against the four-term senator was possible. "I knew Ogg was vulnerable. He made no friends over that bill," says Waters, pointing out that Ogg "angered both Republicans and Democrats. Ironically, the attempt to preserve his senate seat may have finished off his senate career," says Waters. The Killer Bee incident received national attention. Several Texas State Senators went into hiding to prevent a quorum—even the Texas Rangers couldn't find them—and held out until the bill was effectively killed. The day the senators returned, they appeared on Walter Cron- kite's evening news with Waters shown welcoming them back to their senate chambers. With both Republicans and Democrats voting on the same day this year, May 3, the conservative Democratic senator may find himself deserted by the closet Republicans in Senate District 15, whose loyalty to screen idol Ronald Reagan may be greater than their allegiance to Ogg. These folks on the district's western siov which includes River Oaks, Memorial, The Village and Spring Branch have traditionally been Ogg's base of support. The incumbent senator himself admits, "It n;ay be a close race." Political pollster Richard Murray gives the liberal Waters a 60-40 edge over his opponent, noting that Waters' entire legislative district lies within Senate District 15 and that sizeable portions of both Bon Reyes' city council district and Mickey Leland's congressional district also fall within the district. Waters calls himself the alternative in this race, "the people's candidate," and characterizes Ogg as the choice of "special interests." Ogg says, "we're all 'special interest' candidates in a sense. Sure, I can cite Ron's pro-union voting record, for example, and say Ron is a special interst legislator, that I'm the person of the people." But in Ogg's view, this interpretation misses the point. "It's just a matter of who's calling whose interest a special interest." The endorsements of each seems to separate the "people" from the politic ians. Ogg has amassed over $100,000 for his campaign, with assistance from the Houston Homebuilders Association and numerous political action committees (PACs), and has received endorsements from the Harris County Council of Organizations, the Houston Police Officer's Association, and the Houston Trial Lawyer's Association, all groups that traditionally endorse incumbents. Waters has a longer list of endorsements but a smaller campaign budget, less than half Ogg's total. Traditional liberal organizations have endorsed him—Harris County Democrats, Harris County Women's Political Caucus, LULAC, PASO, Texas Teachers Association, ACORN, Gay Political Caucus, Texas Abortion Rights Action League, AFL-CIO, Teamsters and other labor unions. Peer support has come from city council members Ben Reyes, Eleanor Tinsley, Lance Lalor, and Ernest McGowen, and Congressman Mickey Leland. Waters' campaign "manager, the Rev. Bill Oliver, managed Leland's last congressional race and insiders see similarities between the Leland and Waters campaigns. In 1978, Leland was running against councilman Judson Robinson, Jr., the big money candidate who did not even make the run-off. "People forget," says one political observer, "that Mickey was the long shot when the race got started, but he had the popular support. Money doesn't necessarily buy loyalty or votes." Both candidates have faithful follow- ings, but to attract voters to the Democratic primary, they are talking about issues their particular constituencies want to hear. For Waters, consumer issues and restoring the teeth of the Consumer Protection Act (CPA) are high priority. Waters says, "with help from the business lobby and a vote from Senator Ogg," Texas consumers lost their power to collect Jack Ogg, interviewed in his law office, admits "It 11 be a close race.' 18 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH