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Houston Breakthrough 1980-05
Page 11
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 11. May 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5513.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5513

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 11, May 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5513.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-05
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_560aj.jpg
Transcript Now why is it so important to have an 11-year-old girl for the part? (Sue Lyon was 15 when she starred in the film version with James Mason.) It would be unfortunate, to say the least, if an 11- year-old were found who could handle the "explicit sex scenes" promised by Sutherland. Could it be that jaded appetites are no longer titillated by 14-year-olds? Brooke Shields and Jody Foster seemed like heady stuff a few years ago, but that's all been done now—pubescent hookers and bordello child-brides are old hat. When casting directors were looking for a 14-year-old girl for The Exorcist, Pauline Kael wrote in the New Yorker that she was horrified to see the parents and agents of over 200 children scrambling to subject their charges to the indignities of that role. So now we can look forward to 10- year-olds vying for the part of Lolita— after all, they'll be 11 when it starts. Sutherland and Albee, purists at heart, are going all out for authenticity, not to mention box-office receipts. Sutherland explains that Albee and director Frank Dunlap "fully expect certain members of the audience to get up and leave. I'll be surprised if the majority of them last the night. It's devastating stuff." But not nearly so devastating as what Sutherland implies about our society—that girl-children are the last segment of the female population still malleable and vulnerable enough to be exploited with impunity. Sutherland has not been doing too well in films lately. His most recent effort, Nothing Personal with Suzanne Somers, was wholeheartedly panned by critics. Apparently, he hopes that Lolita, his first stage appearance in this country, will restore his fading fortunes. "I've read the play . . ." he says, "and I've also read the book. And now I find I'm no longer able to look an 11-year-old girl straight in the eye . . ." But that's a small price to pay for the chance to boost those ticket sales. James J. Kilpatrick is a conservative, a nationally syndicated columnist and a bastion of Bill Buckley's National Review. All of which could be forgiven him if he were a halfway decent journalist. But Kilpatrick persists in writing such cliched, emotional drivel that one has to wonder if anyone, of the right or the left, can possibly take him seriously. A recent example of his chronic logo- rrhea was a column in which he expressed the fervent hope that the upcoming White House Conference on Families would not turn into another "Houston zoo," like the IWY conference in 1977. (Kilpatrick covered that conference for the National Review.) "The last time Carter gave his benediction to one of these affairs," claimed Kilpatrick, "Bella Abzug led a swarm of ultra-libs into Houston . . . The IWY conference was rigged, stacked and loaded against such conservatives as Phyllis Schlafly." Kilpatrick recapped that "Houston hairpull" where "the assembled bra burners, welfare mamas, do-gooders, lesbians and pro-abortionists easily overwhelmed a tiny minority of conservative women." One is left wondering whether he attended an orderly conference or the siege of the Alamo. His greatest fear for the families conference is that delegates will accept Walter Mondale's "hair-raising concepts" of ". . . legislation that would 'CSnvert millions of children into vir tual wards of the state, with their every physical, emotional and mental need tended by functionaries at thousands of day care centers." The use of words like "functionaries" is a favorite ploy of Kilpatrick's—he also refers to feminists as "comrades." Well, nobody ever accused him of being subtle. It is interesting that there is no liberal counterpart to Kilpatrick—no one who vilifies conservatives and anti-feminists with the same abandon. For this we are duly grateful. But it is unfortunate that such a spokesperson exists for any philosophy. To paraphrase Saturday Night Live, "James, you ignorant slut!" People who criticize are fair game for criticism. With this in mind, it was doubly delightful to read Michael Kilian's piece on Ronald Reagan for the Chicago Tribune, reprinted in the Houston Post April 18. Kilian had received "numerous telephone calls, strangely scrawled letters, threatened lynchings and other expressions of interest, "leading him to explain more fully "why I am not entirely convinced that Ronald Reagan, star of Bedtime for Bonzo, should be leader of the Free World just now." Herewith, excerpts from a funny, incisive piece: In purely domestic terms, Reagan as president would not be all that much to fret about. The Congress would run the country, while he smiled, saluted the flag and made speeches. That's how California was run when he was governor. But foreign affairs is quite another matter. That show is entirely the president's. It's he who takes the hot-line calls and drums his fingers on the SAC alert button. It's he who negotiates our treaties and deals with wily, cunning and sometimes deceitful foreign leaders. If Jimmy Carter is a 2 on a foreign affairs scale of 10, Reagan is a 1, or maybe a zero. He soon will be 70 years old, but the only foreign affairs experience he can claim is seven trips abroad to 19 countries for a total of 89 days. In a press release he put out last month to boast about this wealth of global expertise, he said he had met with "the King ofSiam"in 1£71. Perhaps he meant he had met backstage with Yul Brynner of The King and I. Siam changed its name to Thailand in 1939. Reagan has said he's not as old as such world leaders as Britain's Margaret Thatcher, who happens to be 16 years younger than he is. As recently as five months ago, he didn't know who French President Valery Giscard d'Estaing was. Siam is one thing. France has The Bomb Reagan not only called for American troops to be sent to Pakistan; he told a questioner that Pakistan should be allowed to build an atom bomb. Two hours later, he came back and said: "I suppose in my mind when I answered that question, I was thinking in terms of, if they were going ahead with such a thing as that (atomic bombs), it would not be our position to say, we won't send them (combat planes)." The trouble with being president, especially with all those bombs around, is that you don't always get a chance to come back two hours later with a clarifying statement. Ronald Reagan is a nice fellow, and has some interesting things to say. But he has no more business in that Oval Office than Muhammad AH has being an ambassador. Keep... Judge ED LANDRY County Civil Court At Law No. 2 • Presiding Judge — County Civil Court at Law No. 2 • 19 years experience as Assistant County Attorney • Member, State Bar of Texas • Degree in Business Administration, University of Texas, 1953 • Law Degree, University of Texas Law School, 1960 • Member, Houston Bar Association • Member, State Bar District Grievance Committee, 1974-75 Endorsements Include: Harris County Democrats Coalition of Clergymen & Civic Organizations Harris County Council of Organizations Westside Democrats Harris County AFL - CIO Labor Council Houston Trial Lawyers Association Paid for by The Judge Ed Landry Campaign Fund, Ed Landry, Treasurer 907 Heights Blvd. Houston. Texas 77008 ' Left to Right: Judy Elders, Peggy Hannigan, Sherlene Peterson, Peter Armato, Joanne Adams, Marsha Goff Feminists Support ARMATO Joanne Adams: Montrose Coordinator, former Aide to Lance Lalor. Judy Elders: Heights Coordinator, former Aide to Rep. Ron Waters. Marsha Goff: Campaign Manager, former Aide to Rep. Ron Waters. Sherlene Peterson: Heights Coordinator, Precinct Coordinator for Leonel Castillo Peggy Hannigan: Montrose Precinct Coordinator, former Chair Legislative Committee of Texas Nurses Association. Marilu Rumfolo Lee Read Merylyn Whited Sherie Greene Brenda Case Julia Moore Betsy Scarmardi Ann Barr Sue Moreland Pat Hickey Mary Decker Sandy McKenzie Gayle Ramsey Nancy Bahr Stella Fleming Cynthia C. Gorczynski Carmen Pollock Jan Kirby Barbara Friedman Grace Moore Caroline Bolce Carol Nelson Marcia Carter Louise Kennedy Janis Pool Kathy Butler Wanda Ybarra Laurie Bryan Joanne Adams Michelle Clark Judy Elders Marsha Goff Sherlene Peterson Cora Guinn Karen Haller Peggy Hannigan Gladys House Diana Mazuca Bernice Scotty Pam Williams Alica Rains Mrs. J.S. Gray Jane Kominek Marti Andrew Diana Marshall VOTE FOR PETER ARMATO MAY 3 Paid by PETER ARMATO Campaign, 3505 Washington, Houston Eric Nelson, Treasurer. MAY 1980 11