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Houston Breakthrough 1980-05
Page 10
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 10. May 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5512.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5512

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 10, May 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5512.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-05
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_560ai.jpg
Transcript JOE PENTONY FOR CONGRESS DISTRICT 22 has an impressive record in public office. As a state representative in 1973 and 1975, JOE PENTONY • Supported national and state ERA and opposed efforts to recind. • Supported increased funding for day care centers. • Supported Texas Rape legislation. • Hired a woman or a minority person as his top aide. Endorsed by Harris County Democrats Texas State Teachers Association Paid for by Joe Pentony Campaign Committee. twr- Serving the I Greater Houston Community With Quality... LEISURE LEARNING UNLIMITED No Matter What's Your Bag: Dance, Drama, Music, Business, Sports Of All Sorts, Languages, Art,. Cooking or Personal Development. j In our current schedule, which you I jean receive by calling 721-7299,1 I we offer a wide variety of classes. I Some classes are free and registraj Ition is easy. Cookies and Chimps NBC's Today: looking more like yesterday BY GABRIELLE COSGRIFF ABC's Good Morning America is Whipping the pants off NBC's Today in the ratings. Which, according to AP television writer Peter Boyer, accounts for the fact that Today is shedding its urbane, serious look in favor of a more entertainment- oriented image. "In television," says Boyer, "capitulation is imitation." Ron Hendren, one of television's first TV critics, was fired last month from Today. Hendren, says Boyer, criticized "junk wherever he found it, which was often on NBC." In fact, he had been known to advise viewers to turn their sets from NBC to avoid a particularly offensive program. NBC is now looking for a replacement in the mold of Good Morning America's gossipy Rona Barrett, admitted a network source. The same day that Boyer's piece appeared in the Houston Post (April 14) I switched to Today just in time for a four-minute segment on chocolate-chip cookies—a big batch of free advertising for a New York cookie-maker—followed by at least another minute of follow-up cookie chatter back in the studio. Another irritating feature of Today is that Phil Donahue appears three times a week. Where would daytime viewers be without him, or vice versa? (See cartoon.) In fact, Donahue could be called the gynecologist of the airwaves—women are his business. His Today appearances are simply culled from his regular Donahue program. DOONESBIJRY/Iy Garry Trade&a 3 and a pair of puppets. "There are no puppets or chimpanzees in sight just yet," concludes Boyer, "but it's been rumored that Bunny Rabbit and Mister Moose are playing out their contracts on Captain Kangaroo. W\ fithin 72 hours of the Jonestown tragedy in November, 1978, Washington Post reporter Charles A. Krause, wounded at the airstrip, signed with Berkley to write his eyewitness account, Guyana Massacre, and CBS had bought the rights to the book for a documentary. If the haste to capitalize on Jonestown was unseemly, the message was obviously worth recording, and CBS did a superlative job when Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones finally aired recently (April 15 and 16). It was four hours of gripping, terrifying television, but it was more than television. Janis Parks, in a splendid piece for the Houston Post, quoted the program's screenwriter Ernest Tidy- man, who hoped that Guyana would encourage people to "question the quality of the manner of solutions to our problems. All leaders are suspect. But a skeptical society is a healthy society." The question remains though, as with all dramatizations, how much truth there the mistake of staying tuned to the local news program on those two evenings witnessed a pair of the silliest, most unprofessional local newscasts ever—even for Ch 11's gaggle of gigglers (Steve Smith and Amanda Arnold, anchors; Dan Patrick, sports, and Alexis South, weather). On April 15, Patrick, who labors under the delusion that he is a wit, wasted several minutes of valuable air time on a heavy-handed satire of the Oscar awards involving local sports figures (the rest of the news team seemed to enjoy it). Then, even more humorous, Alexis South's weather map malfunctioned, sending everyone into paroxysms of mirth. The next night, Dann Cuellar did a piece on male body-builders at a local club, the latest in his saga of free advertisements for commercial establishments. Patrick played it for laughs again (he's obviously going to keep doing it till he gets it right) with a story on chicken mascots and their legal foul-ups. (By the way, lest anyone fear that Patrick has forsaken Christianity in sports for the life of a clown, he had soccer star Pele on his sportscast April 14, witnessing for Christ.) The highlight of the hilarities was yet to come, but it was worth waiting for— a replay of Alexis South's zany map misadventure of the previous night. Then—try to control yourselves—the weather map appeared, flanked by two bikini-clad body-builders, which so un- WE'tB TALKING VZBKB BRBNNBR, THB YOUNG mnmOFTHBFBCBNTV/ PUBUSHBP^DUKB: POK- TFAiroFAimrm''. MHAVBAQU&- TfONOVERHBflB? I'M JU5JANAVEPA5E HOUSEWIFE WITHA SENSIBLE QUESTION. M'PBENOWHERS WITHOUT W. W'RB lH/HATTHISSHOiO IS ALL ABOUT. GOAHBAP.^ Television has more "begats" these days than the Bible, and Donahue is running a serious risk of overexposure. Literally. Several months ago he appeared clad only in a pair of white shorts to do a show on weight-reduction. A woman covered him in Saran wrap and he sweated out the rest of the show lying on a table, microphone in hand. That's show biz. On another Today at the close of the Donahue segment, Tom Brokaw spent several minutes plugging Donahue's book, Donahue, my own story. It's ail slightly incestuous. So Today sells Donahue, Donahue sells his book, Brokaw sells Donahue's book, and everybody buys chocolate- chip cookies. As Boyer notes: "the morning network hours have very nearly come full circle, bound back to the early days when Today featured J. Fred Muggs (a chimpanzee) and CBS countered with its original Morning Show, featuring Charles Collingwood, Walter Cronkite is in the reconstruction for TV of the forces that make a Jim Jones possible. As Parks noted, ". . . if you consider Guyana as a factual retelling of how a small boy from Indiana succeeded in leading 900 people to their deaths, then things get sticky. Too many people are involved, and too many of them dead, to even begin to guess at the accuracy of this story." Guyana could have been an excuse for sensationalism—it certainly had all the ingredients—or it could have been a soap opera like Holocaust. But, with a fine cast and sensitive writing, Guyana succeeded, in Parks' words, in making "the events of two years ago in Jonestown, Guyana, seem irreclaimably comprehensible." nerved the blushing weathercaster that she presented her forecast with her back to the charts. You should have been there. The closing segment of the program was a cute little story (what else?) on naming a mutt for the SPCA. Amanda Arnold's final words summed it all up: "I think this station's going to the dogs." _ ; T here was one unfortunate byproduct of Guyana though, one for which CBS cannot be held responsible. Viewers who made |dward Albee has written a stage play of Nabokov's Lolita -the classic story of an older ■man's obsession with an 11-year- old girl. Scheduled to open in New York later this year, the play stars Donald Sutherland as Humbert Humbert. The part of Lolita has not yet been cast. "The girl has got to be a real 11-year- old," Sutherland told Hollywood reporter Roderick Mann, "not a pretend 11-year- old. . . they can't even start looking for her yet. Otherwise she'll be too old by the time the play gets going." 10 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH