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Houston Breakthrough 1980-05
Page 8
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 8. May 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 27, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5510.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5510

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-05 - Page 8, May 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 27, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5534/show/5510.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-05
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_560ag.jpg
Transcript Commitment* Effectiveness* Results* SENATOR JACK OGG has authored the following state laws: The Ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution; The Texas Voting Rights Act; The Bilingual Education Act; The Abuse of Civil Rights Act; The Bilingual Kindergarten Program Act; The Minor Party Petition Act; The Hypothyroidism Testing Program for Newborn Infants Act; The State Legislation for Guadalupe Peaks National Park; The Texas Water Quality Act; The Texas Clean Air Act; The Jury Reform Law; The Texas Highway Beautification Act... SENATOR JACK OGG has authored the following bills: The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Bill; a bill striking racial designations from marriage licenses; a displaced homemaker funding bill; a bill funding battered spouse centers; a utility relief bill for the elderly; The Neighborhood Preservation Loan Fund Bill; a bill funding social services in poverty areas... SENATOR JACK OGG has voted for: The creation of the Texas Commission on the Status of Women; the establishment of a Consumer Information Office in the Attorney General's Office; a bill prohibiting discrimination by race, sex, religion, color or ethnic background in public accommodations, employment, credit and real estate transactions, and the establishment of a Texas Human Rights Commission; a bill making housing available to low and middle income families; a bill granting ratemaking authority to the Public Utility Commission... HIS OPPONENT in the May 3 Democratic primary has authored and passed NO MAJOR LEGISLATION. In eight years as a House member, he has passed only six minor bills—four of these six were carried for him in the Senate by Jack Ogg. JACK OGG GETS RESULTS Pol. Adv. by Jack Ogg, 8046 Long Point Road, Houston, Texas. LOCAL COLOR continued ing and tax assessment have shrunk somewhat, but they remain important, as do the developing roles of the county in pollution, welfare, criminal justice, community development, land management and record-keeping." Houston's apparent push to absorb all of Harris County (and half of Texas it seemed) is over, he thinks. "In 1960," said Raycraft, "Houston was 76 per cent of the county's population-in 1980, we predict it will be only 65 per cent." People are rushing into the area, as ever, but the city's annexation drive has hit a lot of potholes. "The federal voting rights acts require any new annexations," said Raycraft, "not to dilute minority voting strength. The Houston City Council, itself now more representative of minorities, has suddenly become less interested in taking into the city predominantly white populations in the outlying areas. Government, abhorring a vacuum, will rush in and provide the growing but un- Houstonized areas with many city-type services. The county will be the agency which coordinates any overall programs in the future, such as a defense against flood damage, the dumping of carcinogenic and other industrial wastes in unprotected and unaware areas, and the tricts where he did little things that they could have done for themselves. Bass has been able to make one small step for tax savings, he said, which illustrates his second approach to the problem of bureaucracy. This approach is a sort of end-run, an attempt to involve the county and other government entities in regional planning commissions and coordinating boards. The Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) is one of these, involving elected officials from 13 counties around Harris, The step taken was having HGAC purchase, in bulk, two-way radios for all the constables of the 13-county area, thus achieving a cost per unit savings of as much as 40 per cent. The county attorney in Houston, Joe Resweber, Bass said, opposed the move, and "We had to go all the way to Austin to get a ruling from the State Attorney-General which would allow HGAC to make this bulk purchase for its members. It was ridiculous, and we finally didn't save too much money, what with the delay. But we established an important precedent, and in the future possibly HGAC can make more regional decisions." Can the county change, given its long, somewhat sleepy dedication to a very deliberate, though friendly, pace? Bass is The county attorney is not Perry Mason. He's just your basic civil attorney, dickering some farmer out of a piece of land, or trying to get a better rent on the Astrodome. allocation of good farm land for new suburbs and 7-11s, or, alternately, for parks and farm use. At best, the functioning of the county is invisible. When it makes mistakes, we will know about it. For example, Montrose floods every time it rains more than 38 minutes because too much of the county has already been paved over and the water just doesn't want to stay out in the fields like it used to, but instead runs down Westheimer to look at the bright lights. County Commissioner Tom Bass The "Inner City Commissioner" Tom Bass, up for re-election, says wading through the county's problems, as he has done for seven years, inevitably leads to certain insights. It will probably be the county which will take government initiatives in the next decade. Since Harris is going to become a vast, urbanized but splintered entity, overlap and waste will probably result. Bass has tried to deal with the proliferation of office that seems inevitable in government, but the head-on approach left him with nothing but a dent in his time. Said Bass, "There is a lot of duplication between the different government entities. We have city, county and school libraries. We have city, federal and county hospitals—Harris county hospital districts oversee Ben Taub. I have 13 cities, as well as the Montrose-Heights area, in my precinct. They all have health departments, separate purchasing, fragmented jurisdictions. "Harris County," he continued, "has 19 independent school districts. Not only that we have a county school Superintendent. I tried for 10 years, 10, both in the legislature and as commissioner, to eliminate that position—we never needed it. I had no success. The county superintendent lobbied around all the separate dis- prepared to work with either the almost- incumbent Sheppard or the challenger Mike Driscoll. Of the Old Guard he comments: "They are good folks. They probably love their mothers and feed their dogs. But their general effort, you have to admit, has been to conserve present multiplied government entities that we have." The County Attorney It is not surprising that the county attorney spends much of the time covering associates. The job demands that the person serve as the private lawyer for both entity (such as a hospital district) and official (such as a constable) who may be brought into court on any question from possibly violating someone's civil rights to gaining the use of a sump pond. Driscoll and Sheppard agree that the county attorney talks to colleagues— the issue that burns is, who does the attorney listen to? Now, the county attorney is not John Wayne, or Perry Mason. Most of the legal fireworks in the courthouse come from the District Attorney, who commits mayhem on murderers and lets the indictments fall where they may. The county attorney is your basic civil lawyer, usually dickering some farmer out of a piece of land, trying to get a better rent for the Astrodome, or allowing,out in the Katy courthouse, as to how this or that deputy did not unnecessarily bang some arrested drunk driver upside the head. Besides representing county officials and entities in court, the attorney advises the commissioners what the legal consequences of their proposals are. The county attorney earns $63,885, and for the past 23 years, he has been Joe Resweber, who is stepping down at 67. Anthony Sheppard Resweber endorses Sheppard, 37, and a senior attorney in the county office. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH