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Houston Breakthrough, September 1979
Page 23
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Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 23. September 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 29, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/530.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1979). Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 23. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/530

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 23, September 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 29, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/530.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, September 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 23
File Name femin_201109_553av.jpg
Transcript No. 2 and administered a polygraph trial. The test indicated the boy had been lying about Lucario's charges. Assistant D.A. Robert Moens told the Houston Post that a "combination of the youth's age and background apparently caused him to lie about his involvement with Lucario." Boy No. 2 appeared in Bond's trial, which began January 24, and said that his statements against Lucario, Kellogg and Bond were false. "The boy said the police had forced him into making the accusations," said Kellogg. "They worked him over several hours and told him they wanted to get 'those people.' Apparently the police also told him that they knew he had been 'doing things' with the FC counselors." The boy, who was the only witness against Kellogg, also said, "Richard Kellogg never abused me in any way," according to Lovell and Corrigan's notes. Bond's trial was postponed until the following week. At that time, Assistant D.A. Moens was called to the stand as a witness. Under oath, Moens admitted that he and some other members of the D.A.'s office knew the statements against Bond, Kellogg and Lucario were almost totally false. The eight woman-four man jury found Bond innocent of the charges of sexual abuse of a minor and Bond went free. Richard Kellogg went to trial on January 18. The plaintiff, Boy No. 2, failed to appear and Kellogg's trial was postponed until March 5. When the trial did begin, Kellogg says that Prosecutor Sue Krump tried to make a deal. Krump offered Kellogg a plea bargaining deal. If Kellogg would plead guilty to a lesser charge, the state would go easy on him, Krump said. Kellogg refused because, as he says, "I hadn't done anything wrong." The prosecution finally requested that the charges against Kellogg be dropped and the case was dismissed. On May 14, Sue Bennett finally went to trial on one charge of sexual abuse of a child. According to all observers, prosecutor Veronica Morgan relied solely on the story told by a 16-year-old girl. (She was 14 at the time of the alleged incident.) The girl testified in what Bennett terms was a "flat, emotionless voice." She maintained that on March 19, 1978, she was a resident of Family Connection and that she was with Bennett on and off from 8 a.m. until after midnight. According to notes taken by Lovell and Corrigan, she first accused Bennett of fondling her breasts and kissing her on the lips at noon on "hippie hill" in Hermann Park. Next she accused Bennett of having deviate sexual intercourse with her in the FC after Bennett came to work for the midnight to 8 a.m. shift. "She didn't look at me once during the whole trial," Bennett recalls. "And that was hard to do because I purposely stared at her the whole time. I wanted to see where the girl that I had related to so well the year before had gone to." Bennett says that although the girl was asked to leave the Connection, and was the most estranged 14-year-old girl she had ever seen, there was a strong bond between the two. "I feel really sorry for the girl. She was used so terribly by the police and I believe that the person who will suffer the most from the whole trial will be her," Bennett says. "Everybody who had cared for her in the last five years was getting up and saying that she was not a truth- teller." Bennett's lawyer, Stuart Kinard, asked the girl to explain why she did not resist Bennett. She said it was not in her nature to fight, she had nowhere else to live and that, never having had a gay sexual experience, she was curious. Kinard produced 10 witnesses who testified that one or more of the reasons were not true. Eight of them had lived or worked with the girl. Five witnesses, including the girl's foster mother, testified they would not expect the girl to tell the truth under oath. "To me that was the most emotional part of the trial," Bennett recalls. "Her foster mother said she loved her, but that was the way she was. I think several people on the jury were very affected by the incidents." Another dramatic moment occurred, according to Bennett, when Kinard asked the girl if she had written a letter to an FC counselor apologizing for all the trouble she had caused. The letter had apparently been written after the girl made her allegations to the juvenile division and the police. The girl denied writing any letter. When Kinard produced the letter, written and signed in her own hand, she read it tearfully to the jury. Bennett says that this was the only time the girl showed any sign of emotion in her whole testimony. In the letter, Lovell and Corrigan note, the girl said, "they made me do it," referring to the police and her statement against Bennett, and "I can't do anything about it now." When Morgan asked the girl to explain that first sentence, she could not, but she said the police did not force her. The girl said she was "confused" now, but at the time she wrote those sentences, she "was mad at them (the police)." The final witness that Kinard produced was the girl's foster mother, Mrs. Thompson. The FC staff maintained that the girl had left the home for the Thompson foster home early in March. Mrs. Thompson testified that on the date of the alleged incident, the girl had spent the night at home in Barker, Texas, some 20 miles from Houston and could not possibly have been at FC. Thompson said she remembered the date specifically because it was the date of her own daughter's death. Morgan apparently made no attempt to verify the details of the girl's statements and produced no witness to vouch for her credibility. The only motive Morgan suggested was that Bennett was possibly gay, say Corrigan and Lovell. "In a recent issue of Youth Alternative magazine," Bennett says, "Morgan told the interviewer that if she had been able to put me on the stand she would have shown the jury what my 'character' was like." In his closing statements, Bennett's attorney Kinard asked the jury to weigh the evidence without prejudice and beyond a reasonable doubt. After a three- day trial, the jury acquitted Bennett in 20 minutes. "I felt like the jury knew I was a homosexual woman but it didn't matter to them," Bennett says. "There were several women on the jury that didn't shudder at all at the word 'homosexual.' I think they realized that you would have to look far before you find abuse of a child by a lesbian." Bennett says that she came out of the trial feeling hopeful about the possibilities of educating the public to the realities of homosexual life. "The jury was a plus thing for me. I also came out of the experience with strong feelings that it is important for gay people to realize that we are subjected to being dragged off to jail and that is a real danger for us," Bennett says. "I never realized that someone could be arrested purely based on the accusation of being homosexual." Both Kellogg and Bennett say that if the officers indeed had the welfare of the children in mind, they would never have forced them onto the witness stand. "Those police officers forced the children to get on the stand and portray themselves as prostitutes," Kellogg says. Tues., Wed., Thurs. 5-8 p.m. Saturday 10-5:30 I &Q&DAUGHT<EIV % ?.," a feminist bookstore-529-3609 IV I r ^;520^stheimer on, Yogurt Books Bread Bulk grains Herbs Vitamins FkasT Natural Food Store and Juice Bar 3827 Dunlavy 528-8905 l-IOUSI: 01= CCI=I=I=I= MEANS Where women make policy and 2520 Rice Blvd. In the Village 524-0057 10-6/Mon-Frl 10-5/Sat Closed Sun HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 23 SEPTEMBER 1979