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Houston Breakthrough, September 1979
Page 22
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Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 22. September 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/529.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1979). Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 22. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/529

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 22, September 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/529.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, September 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Texas
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 22
File name femin_201109_553au.jpg
Transcript Barthelme-Moore Associates Advertising and Marketing a full-service advertising agency since 1960 Helen Moore Barthelme Odell Pauline Moore 1110 Lovett Blvd., Suite 100 Houston, Texas 77006 713/521-9214 housov-kol'man n. 1. A woman-owned business specializing in quality graphics and printing. 2. A large red brick house in the heart of Montrose. - adj. Having many and varied features. - v. Producing design, illustration, camera work, printing and bindery. - adv. 1. To increase the client's business manifold. 2. To satisfy the client. House of Coleman 901 West Alabama •Houston 77006 • (713) 523-2521 "Whenever we're out of the office, the Breakthrough phones are answered courteously and your messages are taken efficiently 24 hours a day by 4U«&u>efo jmc. OF HOUSTON a woman owned business • CALL FORWARDING • RADIO PAGING • LIVE ANSWERING SERVICE 524 SK northeast office QQ\.2QQB 781-3413 office Fondren office Kirigsrfde 467'2111 ROBERTA K.TILLINGHAST; PRESIDENT Houston • Galveston • San Antonio • Corpus Christi Guilty (continued from page 9) treated from the first moment as if I were guilty and I would begin paying for it now." Bennett says the hardest thing for all four defendants were the legal expenses involved in each case. $5,000 is the going retainer for a second and third degree felony defense and $2,500 to $5,000 extra if cases go to trial. Bond opted for a county attorney, Kellogg turned to his family for help, and Lucario and Bennett received help from friends. All of the people involved in the case felt the D.A.'s office would see the absurdity of the charges and drop the whole case, Bennett says. "It appears to me that the D.A.'s office in this city is completely unethical," Kellogg says. "I was raised under the naive assumption that they play fair, but they don't. They are the District Attorneys and it is their job to prosecute and get an indictment. They don't get promoted unless they get an indictment." The four defendants waited a long time for the charges against them to be acquitted or dropped—Lucario three months, Bond four, Kellogg six and Bennett nine. Bennett went through five postponements, was passed around to three prosecutors and spent three weeks on one-hour call under three different visiting judges before actually going to trial. "The horrifying thing about being under indictment is that it's always with you," Kellogg says. "I kept waking up in the middle of the night and I couldn't go back to sleep. My work performance was awful. I was so humiliated." During the nine months, the Sue Bennett Fund committee worked to raise the necessary funds for Bennett's defense. The committee included feminists, lesbian feminists, a lawyer, a social worker and three ministers. "We decided to keep the fund-raising very low-key because of the accusations that were made," Bennett said. "So, we mostly used word-of-mouth." To date, according to Linda Lovell, the committee's treasurer, the committee has raised $6,087 from the community and $2,500 from the Presbyterian church. This was the first time, Lovell says, that the Presbyterian church nationally had given money to fight gay discrimination. Of the total legal and bail expenses amounting to $11,029.50, $4,000 was borrowed from a bank and $4,326 from individuals. All that remains to be paid of these debts is $2,441.52. Much of the money was raised through donations of $10 and $25 from individuals, says Lovell. Houston Lesberadas, a woman's support organization, gave its entire treasury of $250, she adds. "I think the women really rallied to Sue's support," Kellogg says. "I feel very bitter about the fact that the homosexual male community never even called to see if we had a lawyer. And they are supposed to be more organized." Kellogg says that just one month previously, he had been at a town hall meeting where everybody had talked about "brotherhood." "But the brotherhood was missing when we needed it most," he says. Members of the Sue Bennett Fund committee say they had no doubt that the case was of political importance. Linda Lovell and Pat Corrigan, both active members on the committee, say they believe the four counselors were framed. "We feel that the real issue involved is whether or not gay people have the right to work counseling children," Corrigan says. "We don't know of any other woman social worker that has ever been arrested on a same sex-abuse charge in Houston." Lovell and Corrigan and other members of the committee believed it was important to show Houston police that they could not send an innocent person to jail simply because they were gay. "It's definitely part of the whole homosexual phobia," Bennett says. "People in political office make a big thing out of it. But I still believe that people on the street don't really care who your sex partner is." Boaz says, "The arrests and related crises disrupted us so thoroughly that we could not submit our application to the state until November 1. After this delay we received pressure from Austin to fire Sue. I protested in writing and asked them to request her firing in writing, which they wouldn't. "According to Texas Department of Human Resources (TDHR) regulations, a person whose moral character is in question may not work with children in a licensed home. So, we agreed that Sue would not work at the FC until she was exonerated. Then our application was approved and we opened December 15," he continued. John Lucario was the first defendant to go on trial on December 5, 1978. Lucario was tried in Judge Jimmy James' court on one count of sexual indecency with a minor. This is a third degree felony for which the possible prison term is two to 10 years. The plaintiff, Boy No. 1, had charged that Lucario had fondled his penis through the boy's jeans for approximately two minutes, on the night of May 11th, at the F.C. Both Lovell and Corrigan of the Bennett Committee sat in on the trials and took notes on the proceedings. According to the two women, earlier in his deposition to the police, the boy had said the incident occurred in June. When Defense Attorney James Mori- arty confronted him with this contradiction in dates, the boy said that he could not remember the exact date and his sentence trailed off with "so the police just told me to . . ." The boy also stated under oath that two other residents of the Family Connection had interrupted Lucario in his alleged crime. But, defense council proved that one of the residents had a severe asthma attack on that date and was taken to the hospital. When Carl Boaz was called on the witness stand, he was asked to explain his hiring policies. Prosecutor Susan Spruce asked Boaz, "If you knew a prospective employee was gay, would you still hire him/her to work with young boys and girls?" Boaz replied that if the person were well qualified for the job he would hire them regardless of sexual preferences. After removing the jury from the room, James told Spruce that she could not ask Boaz in the presence of the jury if Lucario was a homosexual. James added that it was not a crime for a person to be a homosexual, and that a person should not be refused a job simply because he was a homosexual. On December 7, the defense rested its case, after proving numerous contradictions in the boy's story. It took the eight woman-four man jury 45 minutes to determine that Lucario was innocent of the charges. After the verdict, according to Lovell and Corrigan, the jurors lined up to shake Lucario's hand and wish him well. On January 15, Lucario went to trial on the second charge, but Boy No. 2, the only witness, failed to appear for the trial. Judge Jimmy James denied a motion for a continuance and the prosecution was forced to request a dismissal of the charge on Lucario. Bond's trial, which was to begin January 22, was postponed because Boy No. 2 again failed to appear. The D.A.'s office eventually located Boy HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 22 SEPTEMBER 1979