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Houston Breakthrough, September 1979
Page 19
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Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 19. September 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 26, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/526.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1979). Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 19. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/526

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 19, September 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 26, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/526.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, September 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 19
File Name femin_201109_553ar.jpg
Transcript or rehabilitated them or have those plans. There are about 15 of those. There are also some tracts which have been purchased by people who plan to put in townhouses, four here, 10 there. They'll sell for $250,000 up. Santos: And what happens to the tenants when these new people purchase? Klein: Well, the tenants have to go. It turns out in a couple of recent cases they've had enough means to purchase their own homes. They've been forced to make that intelligent decision. The others will just have to find new quarters. Santos: There's a real dilemma. There is displacement. On the other hand, if the middle income did not come in, the housing might not be saved. (Shots of young man restoring an old house.) Bill McDugald, new owner in Sixth Ward: These houses are so much better constructed than those being built today. They're hard to work on. It takes a lot longer to fix one of the old ones up but you have a lot more when you're finished. It's worth it up to a certain point. I wouldn't do as much as I did on this house again ever. But somebody who hadn't done it before might have the energy to do it. I feel really proud of this. I've had this dream of what it looked like 100 years ago when it was built and I think it looks almost like that now and there's something very beautiful about that. It's a very honest house. Leonard Duncan, prospective inner city home buyer: I'd classify myself as a middle income wage earner and I'd think I'd be able to afford a house. But it's almost impossible. Right now money is tight. You can't go to a mortgage company, they just say you don't make enough. Just survival is getting harder and harder now. You know we're not talking about the American dream anymore, it's getting a little beyond that. Santos: So, one day James and I were driving down the street in Montrose and we noted some very strange-looking houses. They were much smaller than anywhere else—a different quality altogether and we wondered where it came from? Blue: And we found exact duplicates elsewhere in the wards. We've put the two shots together here just to give you the idea. (Shots of the same house first deteriorated in the wards, then spruced up, in Montrose.) Blue: Mr. Steven Rudy of Creative Restorations: onsite. You can buy them anywhere. The cheapest one we bought was $90.00 Some are old tract houses. It just varies with what day of the week it is-a lot of shot gun houses. Those are the ones with the clapboard. You buy those for $90 - $200. We move 'em on site and we upgrade 'em. And then you have got a house where, say, you pay $5000 for the lot, or excuse me, $50,000 for the lot, that means you can usually, it's a 10,000 foot lot at $5 a foot. You can put four houses on it. You can spend a lot of money on renovation. You end up spending $20,000 if you want. You end up with a $35,000 investment. You can sell it for $40,000 to $45,000, make a reasonable profit and the person made a very good investment, because in Montrose today to buy a one- story house, unrenovated, you can pay $50,000 to $75,000. Santos: Steve, where do these houses come from? Rudy: They come from all over. They do come from the ward areas where they are clearing land. John Mixon, UH Law Professor: So long as the present trends are extended, the middle-income groups are going to continually engage in reverse block-busting, are going to move into low-income areas, buy the houses, paint them, put up burglar bars and squeeze out the current low- income occupants. The housing stock for low-income people is going to diminish year by year. Their units are going to be boarded up because of housing code violations, they're going to burn because of the natural fire incidence that occurs in the inner part of the city and their stock is simply going to dwindle. Additional subsidized units are not going to be provided in nearly enough quantity to take care of the existing number of people who need the housing and they're simply going to double or triple up in existing housing stock. That is going to continue until the point is reached where the pressure from those groups is sufficient that they require some sort of governmental response. When that crisis level is reached then the government will come up with a program that looks as if it's going to respond but which probably will not. I think lower income people cannot be accommodated given this governmental structure that we are part of now. Blue (to advisors): What are, in your mind, the principle issues? Simon: Well, some kind of either creative response of an evacuation plan. I mean that quite seriously. If you're listening to what has been said, what they're really saying is that in one of the richest cities in the country, in a very rich country itself, a city built on the most modern of technologies is incapable of adequately housing its own population. A half century ago, with the New Deal, this society committed itself to having no American citizen ill-housed. And here we are a half- century later in the midst of this abundance and affluence, saying we cannot adequately and humanely house our own citizenry? I simply refuse to believe it. ments we heard at the beginning of this program? Santos: Steve, I believe you're moving buildings from one area to another? Steven Rudy: Yes, we have gone out to used house lots just like a used car lot and we have bought used houses, moved them Stephen Klineburg, Rice U. Chair, Dept. of Sociology: I think part of what we have to ask is why have these problems been so invisible? Why has this city for so many years been able to pretend that these things weren't happening? Why were we able to have a Chamber of Commerce able to make the kind of state- G!ffi©ff$ 15pi»1/l B] t(ofus ion m, Naomi Lede, T.S.U. Director of Research, Urban Resources Center: The invisibility of it, perhaps, lies in the indifference that our institutional sectors tend to adopt. These individuals (become) victims of institutional inadequacy. And (these individuals) become totally invisible to the extent that we only know them as a statistic, not as human beings. And once this occurs then the whole city in essence can become invisible by virtue of neglect. Blue: What you're seeing so far is not a finished documentary. We've only got part of this story. Call us or write us. Tell us what you think should be included in the final documentary. Call 523-4682 or write to S.W.A.M.P., 1506y2 Branard, Houston TX 77006. Special thanks to Juliet Clarke and Karen Spearman for transcribing the 60- minute taped program of The Invisible City. We're working to make Houston a city of neighbors! If you feel you have received different treatment in any aspect of housing because of your race, sex, national origin or religion, contact the City of Houston's Fair Housing Division at 222-5411. !i HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 19 SEPTEMBER 1979