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Houston Breakthrough, September 1979
Page 18
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Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 18. September 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/525.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1979). Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 18. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/525

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 18, September 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/525.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, September 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Texas
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 18
File name femin_201109_553aq.jpg
Transcript right now? What do you plan? Dave Page: Oh, we're going to park our camper and sleep in it. And we're going to stay in it until we find a spot we can stay. If we don't have to pay too much. The thing is, I'd like to get an apartment and a job just like that (finger snap) if I can. But if we can't stay . . . we're done. We're sunk. Blue: So what'll you do? Edria Page: We don't know. We're hoping we won't have to find out. the city that all of the people moving in, this great influx we've been experiencing over the past several years, are all upper- middle class people. We're finding more and more from our waiting list that poor people are moving into the city because of the vast opportunities here. The people we run across here are recent immigrants and they are certainly low-income. Santos: Are some of them going back when they find that housing is so bad? Sandra Adams: Well, I got down here. I was broke. I didn't have no place to go and I didn't know nobody. We left Freeport because he (her husband) couldn't get no kind of work there. And he got a part-time paint job, but that wasn't paying enough. He couldn't get no regular job, so we came down here to see if we could get a job and stay with some people. But we couldn't find one. We only had enough for one bus fare, so I came by bus to keep from walking in the sun with the baby and my husband hitchiked. Rubicella Salazar, Traveller's Aid: I see. Did you have any difficulty finding work? Adams: No, ma'm. He found a job two days after he was here. Salazar: So what has been your most difficult problem? Adams: Getting an apartment. Santos: We have been told repeatedly by everybody in the establishment that in fact there wasn't a housing problem. Why? Because the people coming into Houston are white, affluent, well- educated, young, agressive, and they can buy the housing that exists. Who is moving to Houston? What kinds of people are coming? Skip Kasdorf, Research, Chamber of Commerce: Generally, the survey data that are available indicate that the immigrants to Houston are disproportionately young singles and young couples, disproportionately well-educated, disproportionately in the white-collar occupations and given their age they have disproportionately good earning prospects. Felix Fraga, Director, Ripley House: No. Because I think that they feel if they can't make it in Houston right now they can't make it anywhere else. another to another to another. So I went back to the housing authority and she spoke to me and asked me if there were any problems and I told her someplace to stay, desperately. That's what I told her. For my family and myself I think the main thing I would like to have would be a house, a car, some furniture, a fence around my house, naturally. I would like to have a swimming pool and a color TV. I would like to have all the things that everyone else has-the way they live in America today. I would like to live that way, I really would. Santos: Well, are there lots of people like Sally? Wanda Darby, Director, Resident Services, H.H.A: I'd say at the present time, today, there are probably 100 people like Sally who have come to Houston to really be able to live. There is so much talk about Houston being a boom town, about being the place to go. Whereas we know that the economic situation is the same all over the U.S. Sometimes I wonder if our pr is not too good for Houston because so many people are coming thinking there will be no more problems. Blue: Surburbia 1979: Virginia Curvillier, Director, Traveler's Aid Society: I suspect we would rather not face some of the problems that this group brings to a city, the lower-economic group. I mean we're going to have more health problems, we're going to need more health facilities at the hospitals, at the public housing, at the welfare, and it's better to say that only those that are middle-income and above are coming into Houston rather than really face up to some of the problems we're going to be looking at very shortly. Santos: (To Sally Rowland, newly arrived in Houston with four children, little money, no job, no place to live.) Why did you come to Houston? Rowland: For the opportunity of employment and better living conditions. Santos: What kinds of places did you find? David Sawyer, Sawyer Development Co.: The American family still wants to live, if at all possible, in the surburban setting. That is evidenced I think by what you see going on beyond Highway 6 towards Katy, up Highway 6 towards Spencer Road and beyond. Rheinhardt: There is a misconception in Rowland: Well, the kind of apartment that I would have like to have had would be so far out of reach and the apartment that I could afford would be something like $30 to $35 a week. That would be about $120 to $150 a month but the first one that I looked at had only one vacancy and when I looked at it the apartment was flooded. So at my own expense I would have to clean the water, get the water out of there, and I told the manager there was no way in this world I could afford to. You know, I had no money to do that. I had enough to pay the rent and deposit and a little bit for food and that was it. We have just been from one place to Michael Inselman, Houston Metro Study: But the problem is qualifying people for the loans they want to buy a house. They make pretty good money. The wife and husband both work. They'd like to buy a house and every time the cost of a house goes up $1000 it means they're going to have to earn $250 to $300 more a year to qualify for the loan. So it's a little bit scary when you think about what it's going to take in the way of income to buy the very lowest price house, say even by the end of 1979. The only people who are able to provide a good quality living unit at a low price in a nice subdivision is going to be the volume builder. Blue: How long does it take to make the elements of a house? Phil Warnick, plant manager, Fox & Jacobs: Approximately 45 minutes for the whole house. Mac McKinney, manager, Fox & Jacobs: We build one home right after the other. It's much more efficient. If we delay completing that home one day it costs the person who's going to buy that home. Our construction time on a home from start of foundation to completion is 45 workdays. We have the work process divided into 45 steps so that each step gets completed on the proper day it's supposed to be completed on. Ron Morris, planner, Fox & Jacobs: The cost of housing in the last 5 years has risen 144%. During that same period the median family income has gone up 51% so what's happened is that housing has risen 3 times as fast as a person's ability to buy that housing. During that period about 200,000 families have dropped out of the housing market, are no longer able to affard a new house. Sawyer: Young America is going to have to accept the townhouse and increasingly the condo as an acceptable home. Blue: Why? Sawyer: Because we can't afford to build housing that even the middle income folks can afford—that is, housing that meets their expectations. Not only because of the enormous growth in costs of land and land development, but things that people really bypass day to day and that is the tremendous increase in what I call the after costs, the costs of operating that home once you've got it. Bart Smith, economist: In 1970, just a decade ago, there was very little difference between the price of housing in the urban fringe and the prices in close. Where the absurd inflation occurred has been in close. Why? People don't want to commute. They would rather live in their home than in their car, stuck bumper-to- bumper on 1-45 or the Katy freeway. Barry Klein, realtor (speaking of the Sixth Ward): You can see here the brown lots colored which is where people have gone in, purchased houses, restored them HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 18 SEPTEMBER 1979