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Houston Breakthrough 1979-09
Pages 14 and 15
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Houston Breakthrough 1979-09 - Pages 14 and 15. September 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 29, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1979). Houston Breakthrough 1979-09 - Pages 14 and 15. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/522

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1979-09 - Pages 14 and 15, September 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 29, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1979-09
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Pages 14 and 15
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_553an.JPG
Transcript Clockwise (lower left to lower right): Qab Qab, bride's wedding shoes from Syria, late 19th century; Thob, a Palestine wedding dress from Bethlehem, introduced in the 19th century; Yelek, a coat from Alappo, Syria, circa 1850; Jillayeb from Galilie region Palestine, circa 1860; a Tunesian wedding garment worn under a gold mesh tunic, early 20th century; a Thob from upper Egypt, 20th century; Kirdan, a Saudi choker, early 20th century. Costumes of the Arab World by Barbara Karkabi Gold and greens, rich reds, dramatic blacks, those are the colors that abound in the exhibit, Costumes of the Arab World, which opened recently at Rice University's Sewell Gallery. ' Organized by Sheryl Saunders and Nabila Cronfel, two Arab-Americans who spent months gathering the 80 pieces from collections around the U.S., the exhibit represents costumes from 22 Arab countries. "Not only is the exhibit unique in Houston, it is a first for the U.S. as well," Saunders says, "There have been no other exhibits that show the variety of traditional Arab costumes." Saunders and Cronfel, local art consultants, got the idea for the exhibit two years ago when Saunders was compiling a kit documenting Arab culture. The kit is actually a large box which contains audio-visual material on the Arab world—pamphlets, pictures and instructional materials such as an Arab coffee pot and costumes. Saunders has compiled six kits and they are currently being used in classroom situations by both the Houston and Spring Branch Independent School Districts. "I realized then how little documentation there was on the Arab world," Saunders recalls. "The kit was compiled for that reason. But this (exhibit) should be more of an eye-opener. I don't think anybody realizes what they will be seeing. That's why we have a picture of one of the Palestinian dresses on the invitation." Some of the unusual pieces in the exhibit include a Tunisian wedding dress with ornamental gold pants and a gold mesh tunic and a multi-colored embroidered undergarments, a Palestinian peasant dress with freeform applique designs and antique Bedouin jewelry made of hand-crafted silver. Also in the exhibit is a pair of the world's first platform shoes, QabQab. They are made of wood inlaid with mother-of-pearl mosaics. According to Cronfel, the shoes, popular in Syria, were often used in wedding ceremonies so the bride would stand out in the crowd. "Most people don't think this type of folk art is a valid art form," Saunders says. "But, we both feel it is. Not only that, it is a dying art form which should be documented and preserved." One of Saunders' personal favorites in the exhibit is a Syrian coat from Aleppo, a picture of which appears on the cover of the exhibit's catalogue. Made in 1850, Saunders considers the coat to be one of the finest pieces in the exhibit. The fabric's black background is enriched by intricate and colorful embroidery work. "I can't say I have a personal favorite," Cronfel says, "I'm in love with all of them. I love the Bedouin jewelry and the Palestinian dresses. The typical Bethlehem costume is just beautiful." The two women started working on the exhibit six months ago when they learned Sewell Gallery would be available. "The exhibit is entirely funded by contributions from 22 companies in Houston and a substantial grant that came from the Cultural Arts Council of Houston," Saunders added. "People really loved the idea of the exhibit, and had things to contribute to the exhibit. So many of them had lived in the Middle East." The bulk of the exhibit is on loan from the Smithsonian Institution, the Santa Fe Museum of International Folk Art and the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The Santa Fe Museum has one of the largest collections of Palestinian costumes in the world, Cronfel says. The costumes were left to the museum by an American missionary who lived in the Middle East for years. Cronfel feels that Houston is the logical place to host an exhibit of this type because of its connection with the Middle East. "Houston has the strong economic ties to the Arab world and a greater understanding of Middle East culture than other parts of the country." Cronfel says. "We really want to inform the American public about Arabic art to show them how rich and varied the culture is." Earlier this year, the two women presented an exhibit of Middle East prints by the 19th century British artist David Roberts; at the First City Bank in downtown Houston. "We hope both these exhibits will be the springboard for other shows of this type," Saunders says, "And we hope that the response to this exhibit will indicate an interest in Houston." photos by Jim Youngmeyer HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 14 SEPTEMBER 1979 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 15 SEPTEMBER 1979