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Houston Breakthrough 1979-09
Page 9
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Houston Breakthrough 1979-09 - Page 9. September 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/517.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1979). Houston Breakthrough 1979-09 - Page 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/517

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1979-09 - Page 9, September 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/517.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1979-09
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 9
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_553ai.jpg
Transcript Bennett says that police went to Boaz and asked for a list of names and addresses of children who had been residents within three months of the girl's stay. Since they did not have a warrant, Boaz says he refused to give them the information. However, after Bennett's arrest, the Texas Department of Human Resources made FC comply and Boaz gave the police a list of 100 names. "We felt that the police wanted the kids' names to try and make a bigger case out of the whole thing," Bennett says. assert your own dignity." Later that evening, Kellogg was asked if he was a homosexual. When he said that he was, he was placed in a single cell. Kellogg also remembers being given a physical and the examining physician sent him back to the cell saying, "Don't bring him back unless he's bleeding." "I didn't mind being alone in the cell because at least I got a good night's sleep," he says. "But apparently they give homosexuals a different color tag which I found out when the other prisoners began to make snide comments." "We feel that the real issue involved is whether or not gay people have the right to work counseling children." "Several of the children called us after they were visited by the police and told us about the tactics they used to try and get them to say things." Apparently they got enough out of their interviews because on September 11, both Bennett and Richard Kellogg, Bennett's husband, were arrested. Kellogg recalls that he was at work at the Harris County Mental Health and Mental Retardation Association, administering psychological tests to a three-year- old girl. "There was a knock on the door and one of my colleagues asked me to come out. When 1 told her to wait she said I'd better come out right now," Kellogg recalls. "When I came out 1 saw four men who seemed to be about 18 feet tall." Kellogg was handed a warrant by Officer Ralph Yarborough, for his arrest on three counts of sexual indecency with a minor and one count of sexual abuse of a minor. Kellogg says the police were methodically polite, but he was not read his rights. "I was in shock," Kellogg recalls. "I didn't recognize any of the names and I told them so. But, I realized that it didn't make any difference. I was being arrested. The process was set in motion." The officers took Kellogg outside, handcuffed him and put him in their car. After one hour of searching for Bennett, they found her at home. Bennett says she was fixing lunch when Freeman walked into the room with a drawn gun pointed at her and announced that she was under arrest again. "My landlady, who I babysit for, saw the police and came over," Bennett recalls. "When Freeman asked who she was, I explained and he said, 'It's really something the types of people that some people allow to take care of their kids.' ' In the car with the officers, Kellogg says that at one point Freeman asked him if two of his friends were lovers. "I told him that it was none of his business, and he came out with a stream of unbelievable obscenities," Kellogg says. "He also pointed to Sue and said, 'Do you think that just because she's here I'm not going to do something to you?' " At the City Jail, Kellogg was interviewed by Mayes, whom he calls an "inept bumbler." "I told him he hadn't read me my rights and so he did. At the end of the speech, there is a part that says you have the right to terminate the interview if you want," Kellogg says. "That's what I did. It's a feeling that you'll do anything to Kellogg says that the guards and other prisoners were pleasant until they found out what he was in jail for. "It was altogether a grim experience," he says. "I guess it would have been different if I had been in jail for a traffic violation, but I wasn't. I kept thinking that my life and my career were finished." Kellogg's bond was set at $10,000. On the advice of his lawyer, he decided to stay in jail overnight in hopes the bond would be reduced the following morning. James Moriarty, Kellogg's lawyer, managed to get the bond reduced to $4,000. Kellogg paid $450 bail, and eight hours later was taken off a bus, just as it was leaving for the prison farm. He had heard of the arrests of Bennett and Kellogg the evening before. When he learned there was also a warrant for his arrest, Lucario raised the bail money and called his lawyer. The charges against him were one count of sexual indecency with a minor and one count of sexual abuse of a minor, both of which are felony offenses. After Lucario turned himself in, he says that Officers Freeman and Yarborough arrived at the courthouse and asked that he be released to their custody. He was taken to the juvenile "I felt all along that this particular group of police were into really into publicity. They seem to live in the gutter and they did it with Channel 2, 11 and 13 right behind them.3 >* Bennett's bond was set at $10,000 and the Sue Bennett Fund, after deciding not to leave Bennett in jail overnight, raised the necessary bail of $1,250 and Bennett was released at midnight. Former Family Connection counselor James Bond was attending classes as a pre-med student at Prairie View A&M when he learned of the arrests of Bennett and Kellogg. It was through a news broadcast that Bond discovered he was also wanted by the police. Bond set about raising his bond money and returned to Houston to turn himself in. At the city jail Bond was told he was under arrest on a felony charge of sexual abuse of a child. Although his bail was arranged, Bond says that he was placed in a cell for two hours before police released him on bond. Like the others, Bond says his rights were never read to him. "1 was questioned by officers who wanted to know if I was a homosexual," he says. "The whole experience was humiliating and perverse." On the morning of Tuesday, September 12, former Family Connection staff member John Lucario also went to the Harris County courthouse to give himself up. department of the city jail where he was told to stand for photographs. When Lucario asked why the pictures were being taken in such a rush he was told the police wanted to make the 12 noon news. "I felt all along that this particular group of police, and especially Yarborough, were really into publicity," Kellogg says. "They seem to live in the gutter and they do it with Channel 2, 11, and 13 right behind them." Lucario says that although he posted his bond immediately, Yarborough had a hold placed on him and he spent the next day and a half in city jail. "At several sessions I had with the officers I was subjected to interrogation," Lucario says. "They kept telling me that I was in a lot of trouble. After a while Freeman and Yarborough hinted to me that what they wanted was information on a Houston attorney who was a friend of mine." Both Yarborough and Freeman hinted that they would get him 10 years probation, or a dismissal of his charges if he gave them the information, Lucario added. After the arrests of Bennett, Kellogg, Lucario and Bond, all the television news media were provided with polaroid pictures of the defendants. Salzhandler, in an interview on Channel 11 TV, said, "Somebody has to speak out about the prostitution ring at the Family Connection." He claimed that "lesbian staff" of the FC took female children to lesbian bars where they were sold to older lesbians for $ 1. Interestingly enough, after making all these accusations and provoking the original investigation, Salzhandler dropped out of sight and has not been seen since, Bennett says. He never testified at any of the defendants' trials. While TV news reports devoted extensive coverage to Salzhandler's and the police's version of the story, both the Houston Post and the Houston Chronicle noted the arrests only briefly in their back pages. In the meantime, the Family Connection had temporarily closed in early August, 1978, in order to meet new licensing demands, says Boaz. "We were shocked to hear from a new licensing worker that our license was due to expire on August 23, and it might be too late to avoid interruption of services," Boaz says. "She explained to us that our old worker had failed to provide us with the proper 90-day notice of expiration and had then quit the department." Boaz says the new worker advised him to close the home and reopen an emergency shelter because that status required keeping less permanent records. So FC closed temporarily on August 24. During the closure they redesigned administrative procedures and remodeled the building in accordance with emergency shelter standards, Boaz says. However, Boaz says the media jumped on the closing and assumed it was in connection with the arrests. "When we did open, the media didn't mention the fact until two months later," he says. "And then there was only a small mention of it in the Chronicle." In the meantime, all four defendants were indicted by a grand jury. "It seemed to me to be a conspiracy from top to bottom," says Bennett. "None of us had examining trials and we were indicted before we had a chance. It was really quite frightening. I was (continued on page 22) HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH //SEPTEMBER 1979