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Houston Breakthrough 1979-09
Page 7
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Houston Breakthrough 1979-09 - Page 7. September 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 25, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/515.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1979). Houston Breakthrough 1979-09 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/515

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1979-09 - Page 7, September 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 25, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/515.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1979-09
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_553ag.jpg
Transcript owner of the Los Angeles Times and myriad other properties. The media conglomerate had sales topping $ 1.4 billion last year and is one of the most profitable companies in the nation. In fact, profits are so high, insiders say, the firm is looking for ways to spend money—on the theory that if you don't spend it, Uncle Sam will get it anyway. The firm has a reputation for improving the papers it buys. Since it took over the Dallas paper, the editorial budget has doubled and the "news hole" has increased by 30 percent. So the Houston outpost is a logical step and follows close on the heels of the paper's creation of a one-person Mexico City bureau. In this day and age, what replaces the town hall, the forum?" asked Adele Santos. "Clearly, television could." Santos and James Blue have created a fascinating and innovative TV project where the viewer is an active participant in the making of a documentary film. The Invisible City (see story p. 16) is a series of five programs produced and directed by Santos and Blue, with video and film production by Lynn Corcoran and Tom Sims. Four of the five segments have already appeared on Channel 8; the final one will air October 1. Material from all five segments will then be edited to create a one- hour documentary film, to be completed by the first of next year. "What is unique about the project," said Blue, " is the audience participation." It sounds too good to be true. Public access to TV. The public's airwaves being used by the public. But do minorities, the poor, the under-educated, the transient, the people affected most by this series, watch? "Amazingly, they did in this case," asserted Santos. "The whole of Carverdale was watching the first segment. Then they get hooked into the process. I think we're hitting a broad spectrum." Mindful of the advent of cable TV to Houston, I asked Blue whether the public access channels, which cable is obliged to provide, could be used for similar projects. "They could," he replied, "but nobody would watch. It's got to happen on the channels where people watch." It may be a long time before viewer- participation documentaries preempt Monday Night Football. But when minorities and the poor tune in to Channel 8, that bastion of the white middle class, something is happening in the Invisible City. It's bad enough that the Susan B. Anthony dollar—because of its two-bit size—has not been accepted by the public. But even worse, for feminists, has been the opprobium heaped on Anthony herself by certain individuals, most notably in letters to the editor. So it was heartening to see the following letter from Diann Peterson of Minneapolis, which appeared last month in the Minneapolis Tribune. Well, well, well, we now have a "blue- nosed, bad-tempered, monomania-suffering old maid on a fake silver dollar, " as Ernest B. Furgurson kindly pointed out /Tribune, July 9). Too bad he didn't point out that on the $20 bill we have a man who stole Cherokee Indian lands and then forced them on a death march. Or how about the drunken general whose administration was fraught with corruption, w h o res ides on the $50 b ill ? How could Furgurson forget the two blessed forefathers who framed our Constitution with its implicit ideals of freedom and dignity for all, but who enslaved black men, women and children, and who are on our $1 and $2 bills? Then look again at Susan B. Anthony, who, while never achieving the worship accorded the aforementioned hypocrites, stayed true to her ideals of freedom and equality for all. large Crumbaker, Houston Post gossip columnist, sometimes >hides little bombshells among the froth and glitter of the Zum-Zum Gang. For example, last July (under Super People) she chided the New York Times for saying, in a review of Confession and Avoidance, that author Leon Jaworski wrote the bestseller to "take shots at his enemies." Not so, said Crumbaker. "What the Times reviewer doesn't know is that , only hours before the book was to roll off the presses, Leon deleted some really strong material which might have been harmful to Richard Nixon and two highly placed Republicans." Apparently this was done over the publishers' strong objections. The deleted remarks were about "someone who is a (presidential) candidate," claimed Crumbaker, which should narrow down the field somewhat. Why didn't the media pick up on the story? "I don't know," said Crumbaker. "It would make a fascinating little tale." When Crumbaker was in England recently, she reported that her dinner partner one night was a British intelligence officer, who offered the intriguing suggestion that the Ayatollah Khomeini is an imposter. "He said the real Khomeini had three fingers missing from his left hand," recalled Crumbaker. "He told me that everybody in British intelligence knows that." Again, no news organizations picked up the story. Which didn't seem to worry the exuberant Crumbaker. "Wasn't that fun?" she said of the Khomeini story. "God, I loved that!" So did I. SPECIAL SCREENINGS DAILY If you're looking for a new way to advertise, or if you have a unique printing problem, try our silkscreening services. We can print anything from t-shirts to a table top, including: Exhibit & display work, 8' panels (on formica or glass), 20' banners, outdoor signs, t-shirts and garments, and brochure covers. Call us for an estimate on your special screening. A&E SCREEN PRINTING Mary Lou Crossley, Curlis Ann Reynolds 6245 Brookhill #2, Houston, Texas 77087/(713) 644-1731 2043 West Gray, Houston, Texas 77019 (713) 526-9991 f YE fftANCE jewelry, wearables, antiques, handcrafts Pam Glosserman Eve France Tuts..—Jk+: /C-rV /7Z4 Jl/sso////£r INSURANCE for your Business, Your Estate and You including: health insurance disability income life insurance retirement plans please call: GRETCHEN D. STEPHENS, C.LU. 4801 WOODWAY, SUITE 320 WEST HOUSTON, TEXAS 77056 626-2770 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH SEPTEMBER 1979