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Houston Breakthrough 1979-09
Page 6
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Houston Breakthrough 1979-09 - Page 6. September 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 1, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/514.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1979). Houston Breakthrough 1979-09 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/514

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1979-09 - Page 6, September 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 1, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/514.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1979-09
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_553af.jpg
Transcript Media Matters by gabrielle cosgriff We get there first and stay all day," claims the Houston Post. Well, not any more. As of September 4, the Houston Chronicle has a morning edition, complete with bright yellow banner and assorted hoopla. The Post's reaction to this encroachment on its early-morning turf, even before it happened, was to come out with a "Final Edition," starting August 23, which hits the newsstands later in the morning. The Chronicle is opening seven bureaus in surrounding areas, such as Huntsville and Brenham, and is hiring several new reporters. Even Ed McMahon, TV's huckster supreme, is in on the act. Extolling the Chronicle's new features and expanded coverage, McMahon's TV ads promise "everything you'd ever want in a newspaper." The fact that both dailies now have morning editions may lead to some confusion. Unfortunately, time of delivery has sometimes been a useful guide in telling one from the other, since content and style are often interchangeable. Take, for example, their strikingly similar coverage of the recent difference of opinion between City Controller Kathy Whitmire and Houston Mayor Jim McConn. Whitmire questioned the expenditure of funds for hiring consultants to help the city draw single-member district boundaries. McConn threatened to take her to court if.she didn't approve the expenditures. peaceably, McConn said, she'll have to face the city's guns in court." In that same Post story, McConn, his feathers obviously ruffled, said, "The mother hen sits on most contracts. But the mother hen will be blasted out of the coop if she doesn't turn it loose . . . We'll take her to court." The sexual put-down of "mother hen" and the violence of "blasted out of the coop" are further illustrations, (as if we needed any) that the macho, frontier mentality is alive and well in Houston. The Texas Observer has been without an official editor since Jim Hightower resigned in July to run for the Texas Railroad Commission. Managing editor Linda Rocawich is acting editor until the position is filled. September 1 was the deadline for applications, and Rocawich did not apply for the job. Rocawich has been at the Observer for two years and has been managing editor since February. Before that, the Observer had no managing editor for six months, while Rocawich, who was then associate editor, and fellow associate editor Eric Hartman, shared the responsibilities of the job. "We were trying to do things differently," said Rocawich. "Neither one of us wanted to create hierarchies. Neither of The mother hen sits on most contracts. But the mother hen will be blasted out of the coop if she doesn't turn it loose.. .We'll take her (City Comptroller Kathy Whitmire) to court. —Mayor Jim McConn The Post's Tom Kennedy began his story, "In the fashion of a classic western standoff, Mayor Jim McConn . . . gave . . . Whitmire until high noon Thursday ... If Whitmire fails to act . . . he will aim the city's legal guns at her and take her to . . . court for a showdown." Not to be outdone, or outdrawn, Fred Harper of the Chronicle said, "An old- time western showdown is shaping up at high noon Thursday between . . . McConn and . . . Whitmire, both sticking to their guns . . . Unless Whitmire goes along us wanted all the administrative responsibilities—we thought we could divide it up. But it worked out that we did need somebody who was responsible for managing." So Rocawich is now officially the managing editor. She is also the de facto editor, with all the authority of the editor, "for however long it takes." With or without titles, the staff of the Observer, that "journal of free voices," continues to bring us the best in Texas journalism. Speaking of titles, it's time for an update on how the world turns at Houston City Magazine. Out, fired by owner Francois de Menil on August 2, are publisher Gary Easterly, editor David Crossley, design director Peggy McDaniel, and advertising director Lynette Gannon. In, as of that date, are publisher Francois de Menil and editor Nathan Fain. Out, then in, is managing editor Linda Sylvan, who handed in her resignation a week after the firings, then withdrew it. Out, then in, then out again, is Laura Furman, who quit to protest the killing of a nuclear story in June, then came back as a consultant, then was fired by editor Fain. the thick of another magazine project." He will be part-owner and publisher of Texas Sports magazine, due to hit the newsstands in September 1980. A monthly, the magazine will be "very unusual," promises Easterly, "no scores, no how to string a racquet or swing a golf club-it will celebrate the sports fanatic in all of us, the good and the bad." Ex-editor Crossley, who replaced ex-ex-editor Tom Curtis last March, has several irons in the fire. Among other projects, he is working on some ideas to do with the space program. Laura Furman has been in New York recently, putting the finishing touches on her book of short stories, The Glass House, which will be published by One night a British intelligence officer told me that the Ayatollah Khomeini is an imposter. He said the real Khomeini had three fingers missing from his left hand and that everybody in British intelligence knows that. —Marge Crumbaker De Menil, you may remember, caused a lot of fallout among the staff when he killed a story that was critical of the South Texas Nuclear Project (Media Matters, May, June, 1979.) Incidentally, Crossley shared the byline on that story with Andrew Sansom, although he does not believe that was the reason he was fired. Fain, who grew up in Nacogdoches, considers himself the "New York influence" at City, says a staffer. He came down from New York this summer, where he had been a freelance writer, at ex-editor Crossley's request. "I didn't realize I was hiring my own replacement." says a bemused Crossley. Fain is no stranger to Houston. For several years he was the Houston Post's film and theater critic, and he worked on the old Houston Journalism Review. He put in a stint in the early days at KPFT, Houston's public radio station. Opting for discretion over valor, says Fain, "I decided to quit the second time the transmitter was blown up." As editor, Fain promises "more service pieces" and says that City's "graphic excellence will be improved." Ex-publisher Easterly is already "in Viking next year. Two of her stories have been bought by the New Yorker and will be published within the next year. As we go to press, we learn that Francois de Menil, president of de Menil Publications, Inc., owners of City, and now publisher of City, will have a new title in next month's staff box—editor-in-chief of City. As ex-publisher Easterly notes: "It's his money." The Dallas Times Herald is getting ready to open a Houston bureau -finally. It's a move that has been rumored in newspaper circles for at least two years. State editor Jon Sender- ling and managing editor Will Jarrett came down to talk to some local talent recently for what, at least initially, will be a one-person operation. They have also interviewed prospects from outside the area. Besides the obvious logic of having their own staffer in the state's largest city, there is another reason for the Times Herald's move. The evening daily was bought in 1969 by the Times Mirror Co., daniel boone cycle 5318 CRAWFORD HOUSTON, TEXAS 77004 (713) 526-7011 HQUSTpN BREAKTHROUGH SEPTEMBER 1979