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Houston Breakthrough, September 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 4. September 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 7, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/512.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1979). Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/512

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, September 1979 - Page 4, September 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 7, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/536/show/512.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, September 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
File Name femin_201109_553ad.jpg
Transcript Newsmakers by H. Kathleen Gresham and Diane Harrington Kathy Whitmire, Houston's City Controller, was featured in US magazine (September 4) in an article called "One of these women may be our first woman president." The article took note of the fact that she is "being promoted as a successor to the city's politically troubled mayor, Jim McConn." "But," she insists, "I'm not interested if my principles have to be compromised. I'm getting pressure from business groups to change my position on women's and gays' rights. The office isn't that important to me." When asked about running for national office, Whitmire commented, "I don't think you can plan those steps in advance. I didn't plan to run for city controller, but the timing was right . . . We're a fair distance away from having a woman president. I think we'll see a woman Vice President first." Also featured in the article were Carol Bellamy, president of New York's City Council; Jane Byrne, Mayor of Chicago; Olympia Snow, U.S. Rep. from Auburn, Maine; Pat Schroaeder, U.S. Rep. from Colorado; and Yvonne Braith- waite Burke, U.S. Rep. from California. "Some of them may seem like long shots now," the magazine points out, but adds, "remember that two decades ago, Ted Kennedy had just passed the bar exam in Massachusetts, Gerald Ford was a greenhorn Michigan Congressman and Jimmy Carter was the chairman of the Sumter County (Ga.) School Board. Mary Heather, a 75-year-old retired teacher in Stockbridge, Mass., is helping beat the energy crisis by saving and restoring to operation one of hundreds of abandoned small hydroelectric plants in New England. "My own power plant—that's exciting," she said laughing, "but our prime thing is saving energy." People call it "Mary's power plant," although she owns it with her 70-year-old brother, a retired electrical engineer. They hope to have it in operation by October. The plant should have a capacity of about 200 kilowatts when it starts up with one turbine powering a generator. Heather is confident they can re- harness the waters of the beautiful Housatonic River, and so is the New England Electric System, which has contracted to buy their power. The plant is expected to provide enough power to light and run appliances in 100 or more homes, saving many thousands of gallons of high-priced foreign oil. Some people wanted to tear down the 50-by-50-foot granite building (built in 1906 and shut down in 1947). "I don't like to see anything destroyed that can possibly be used again," she said, "and I thought that this was an exceedingly well-built structure. It would be a crime to tear it down." "Mary was the pioneer," said Jack Casey, coordinator of power contracts at the New England Electric System. "Hundreds of old sites will (now) be looked at." "It has made a lot of other people aware that New England is blessed with streams and abandoned dams," she said, "and that we should use these energy resources." Linda L. Cathcart is the new Director of the Contemporary Arts Museum. Cathcart comes to the CAM from a position as curator at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, N.Y. for the past four years. She told a New York Times reporter recently, "Buffalo taught me that the real function of a museum director, in the end, is to build the collection. In Houston my new museum doesn't have a collection at all-its function is to house temporary exhibitions-but I'm wondering if I oughtn't to try to change that in time." Her previous professional associations have included the Brooklyn Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Los Angeles County Museum and the Metropolitan Museum. Cathcart's educational background includes a Fine Arts undergraduate degree from California State University at Fuller- ton, a M.A. degree in Art History from Hunter College in New York and postgraduate study as a Fulbright Fellow at the Courtauld Art Institute in London, England. Cathcart was the unanimous choice at the May 31st meeting of the CAM Board of Trustees following an intensive nationwide search which included distinguished museum personnel from throughout the country. She assumed her new role on September 1 and is working on a Nancy Graves retrospective. Sue Bennett a Family Connection counselor was found innocent of sexually abusing a child following a trial in State district court '$£ last May 17 (see story page 8). Although the year-long ordeal is over, her friends who raised over $16,000 to meet bail bond and legal fees, still need $2,000 more to repay loans. A benefit concert on behalf of the Sue Bennett Fund is planned for Thursday, September 27 at 8 p.m. at Fitzgerald's, owned by Sarah Fitzgerald, located in the Heights, 2706 White Oak at Studewood. ADD LIB, the all women's jazz band will play at the concert. See Network page 26 for ticket information. Cassandra Cole, age 12, of Chicago, spent her summer vacation teaching in a school she started last summer, called Excel to Excellence. The 13 pupils, ages 4 to 8, met on a porch in Cassandra's back yard each week day afternoon from June 5 to August 20. She was assisted by her cousin Gia Huff, 11. Together, they taught mathematics, spelling, and reading. Cassandra took her school seriously—giving individual attention to each child. She assigned homework, administered tests, and issued report cards three times during the summer. Cassandra says she thought of starting her own school for a long time. Last year, with her parent's permission, she obtained the permission of her pupils' parents and did it! "Some people said I should charge, but I don't want to. I just wanted them to come and learn," she said. Cassandra knew the value of praise. She put stars on good papers and hung them on the "good work" wall in the classroom. Good students received a certificate at the end of the summer. Debbie Rollins, Cassandra's seventh- grade teacher was not surprised to hear about the summer school. "I think it's typical of the type of grown-up Cassandra is going to be. And she's going to be much more and achieve much more." Francine Friend, founder of the Women 's Success Development Center, which opened this year, describes the center's programs, "We're an educational and counseling center for women, with an emphasis on t F \ education. "Women learn from talking with other women and from that talking we learn who we are, what we need, and what we feel. We also learn about the lives of other women." Twice weekly, she holds "Brown Bag Lunch Talks" for a $ 1.00 donation. Working women come on Wednesdays; homemakers on Thursdays. On Wednesday evening a support group meets from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. for a rap session. Friend, who has a master's degree in sociology and her mother, Sharlee Friend, M.S.W., and Jeanne Zell, M.S. run the center. They hold workshops on such topics as self-esteem and confidence building time management, and sex education. The center is located at 5400 Memorial, Suite 708. For information, call 840-9207. Barbara Ellman, M.S.W. is leading a six- week lecture and discussion on Women: The Other Sex at the Jung Educational Center, 5200 Montrose. It is for those who are ready to explore the philosophical, historical and psychological components of women's subordination and the alternatives available today. The lecture continues for six weeks beginning September 12 and runs mid-day from 12:15 p.m.-1:45 p.m. Call 524-8253 for more information. Ruth Yale Long, Ph.D., is a Houston nutritionist and the founder of the Nutrition Education Association, Inc., now offering nutrition services for anyone who wants to gain pep and energy, to eliminate damage from stress, to ward off colds before they start, to be slim, and to feed her body (and those of her family) so well that the body will heal itself of dis-ease. Dr. Long conducts nutrition classes and does individual counseling in nutrition. A home study course is also available. Dr. Long will speak without charge to any organization on such subjects as Stress, Depression, and Mental Prob- ns; Allergies; Disabilities; Nutrition and Weight Control; a Basic Diet and Food Supplement Program; Vitamins; Minerals; and What We Should and Shouldn't Eat and Why. Offices are at 3647 Glen Haven. For information call 665-2946. Send information for this column to Newsmakers, Houston Breakthrough, P. O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. B&Efckfhroutfh September 1979 Vo. 4, no. 7 Advertising Shirley Bryson Art Mary Cerruti, Gary Allison Morey, Loretta Standard Circulation Melissa Hauge, Eula McMurry, Debra Thornton Copy Editors Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, H. Kathleen Gresham, Dixie Lee Hawkins, Brenda Loudermilk, Gary Allison Morey, Hildegard Warner Cathy Whitmire, Red Zenger Editors Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff Office Janice Blue, Shirley Bryson Photographers Janice Blue, David Crossley, Bill Dennis Theresa Di Menno, Sharman Petrie, Ernie Shawver, Danette Wilson Jim Youngmeyer Production Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff Gary Allison Morey, Debra Thornton Proofreading Gabrielle Cosgriff, Judy Hopkinson, Debra Thornton, Dorris Taylor Radio Show Gertrude Barnstone, Nancy Lane Fleming (host) Typesetters Mary Lou Chollar, Mary Fouts, Gary Allison Morey, Lynne Mutchler, Virginia Myers Second-class postage paid at Houston, Texas. Houston Breakthrough USPS 413130, is published monthly (except for the bi-monthly issues of July-August and December-January) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood, Houston, TX 77004; P.O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004; Tel. 713/526-6686. Subscriptions are $7 per year, newsstand $1.00 per copy. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60201. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Houston Breakthrough, P.O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH SEPTEMBER 1979