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Breakthrough, February 1976
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Breakthrough, February 1976 - Page 12. February 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5261.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1976). Breakthrough, February 1976 - Page 12. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5261

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough, February 1976 - Page 12, February 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5261.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Breakthrough, February 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 12
File Name femin_201109_514l.jpg
Transcript Olga knows her racket Extensive television coverage has made Olympic gymnast Olga Korbut more famous in America than she is in her native Russia. Now another Russian Olga has come along to share some of this international spotlight. She is Olga Morozova, currently ranked number one in Russian tennis, number four in the world and number three on this year's Virginia Slims Tour. She is also an extremely personable, humorous and very, very outspoken woman. Interviewed recently while playing on the Slims tour in Houston, Olga treated reporters to a very refreshing view of sports: a view that, if shared by other professional women athletes, is rarely expressed. Not limiting herself to tennis, Olga got right out front on a number of topics: Sport s in Russia: Hockey and figure skating are the most popular sports in Russia and the ones most often seen on TV. Olga finds figure skating boring to watch. "All of the champions (pairs) have been champions for 10 or 15 years," she said. "It (the routine) is always the same thing. Last year they announced a new act and it was going to be on (Russian) television. Wonderful! Everyone watches-it's over in five seconds! What kind of a new act is that? Tennis isn't like that, tennis is fun to watch." Olga Korbut: "She's not as popular in Russia as she is in America. TTie Russian people prefer Turischeva. (Ludmilla Turischeva, the current world's all-round champion.) They see right through Korbut. Turischeva is a true champion. Olga (Korbut) is selfish." Tennis in Russia: "It's becoming more popular. There are no professional sports in Russia, but there's more money around now." The women's team is much better than the men's team, according to Olga. "The girls develop faster than the boys. The little girls play all the time, before school, after school. The girls beat the boys. (In Russia they practice together.) The Russian men are young and inexperienced, they have to learn to concentrate." Natasha Chmyreva, the young Russian who is playing on her first Slims tour: "Natasha is very young (17) and she just loves to play right now. She loves to go out and hit the ball and run. When she wins she is very happy. 'I almost beat Chrissie Evert.' Chrissie is not like that. She doesn't run around saying, 'I'm the world champion.' Natasha does, she says, 'I won the French Juniors' or, 'I won the French grand slam', you know, things like that. We'll have to wait a couple of years to see how she is going to be. We (The Russian Tennis Federation which, incidentally, gets all the money that the Russian Tennis players win) have put a lot of work into her." 12 OLGA MOROZOVA Does Olga think that the younger Russian women will surpass her and drop her in the ratings? "Me, fifth? Never! I can't see myself as fifth!" (Laughing and knocking on wood.) ITie Slims Tour: (This is her second year). "In Russia we call it the world's championship of tennis. Well, why not, what else is there?" When Olga joined the tour last year she played in Akron, Ohio where they have instant replay screens. "It was terrible. I lost the first two games. I kept watching myself on the replay screen. Is that really me? I look so fat, I look awful!" (She is not fat by any stretch of the imagination.) Her future: She'll play two more years, then go home and have a baby. (Her husband is an electrical engineer.) "Coach? Yes, but maybe I'll stay home and have a lot of babies, then coach the babies. No, I'd like to coach, I'd be a good coach. But who knowns, that is a long time away. Who knows what will happen in two years." Olga feels that women with children should stay home and raise them and not work. She disagreed with Margaret Court's decision to bring her children with her on the tennis tours. "Then you have to have someone waiting in the locker room to feed the baby, change the baby and everything. That's not right, a baby should be with its mother, not in a locker room." Olga had a happy childhood and believes that all children should have the same opportunity to be "free in the wind and the grass" as she was when she was a child. Men vs. Women: Can women beat men? "Yes, why not?" She then qualified this a little. "Chrissie couldn't beat Jimmy (Conners) right now but she could beat her brother. I can beat my husband and he's a pretty good player. Maybe women couldn't win all of the time (excepting the men professionals) but with the same training most of them could." At this point Janet Newberry, who was being interviewed with Olga, whispered something to Olga (a warning?). Olga replied: "I don't care, I say what I think and I think yes, why not? " Why not indeed, Olga Morozova? Who says there's no feminist movement in Russia? JAN CUNNINGHAM Upsets at Slims Houston was the first stop in 1976 for the Virginia Slims Tennis Tour and it soon became apparent that the top-seeded players on this year's tour are in for long struggle if they intend to hold their positions until the tour ends. There are many fine young players trying to move up in the standings and it appears that they find nothing unattainable, not even Chris Evert's number one spot. The tournament began with an almost upset of Number One herself when 17 year old Natasha Chmyreva of Russia (playing in her first tour) extended Chris to the limit, losing in two sets 4-6 and 5-7. Immediately following that match the youngest player on the tour, Kathy Kuykendall, thoroughly trounced Chris' younger sister Jean to record the first "real" upset of the tournament. In round two, more favorites fell by the wayside as Cynthia Doerner (a former Houston E-Z Rider) upset 7th seeded Wendy Overton, Terry Holladay upset Pam Teeguarden, and Renata Tomanova upset 5th seeded Francoise Durr. Early successes proved fickle, however, as all of the upstarts fell to the favorites in round three. Sixth seeded Rosie Casals provided the only exception by defeating 3rd seeded Olga Morozova, who had beaten her in their two previous meetings. Apparently the players in the semi-finals finally read the script and everything went according tc the plot with Chris Evert disposing of Rosie Casals and Martina Nauratilova, the number 2 seed, stopping Nancy Gunter. So it was number 1 and number 2 in the finals and number 2 took charge immediately. Playing Chris' baseline game as if she had invented it, Navratilova chased Chris from the court in straight sets, 6-4, 6-4 to walk away with the year's first tournament. Following the match, Chris announced cryptically to reporters that she felt that she had lost because she was becoming "friendly with the other players on the tour this year." (One wonders then, what her life has been like in prior years on the tour?) The loss to Navratilova in the finals was only the beginning of a bad day for Chris as she and Navratilova teamed up for doubles only to find the winning combination of Rosie Casals and Francoise Durr too strong. Casals and Durr took the doubles title in straight sets, winning easily. Still, there's the whole year to go much too early to start counting Ms. Evert out. (As a matter of fact, between dates with Jack Ford in Washington she managed to "unfriendly" herself enough to win the second tour of the year.) JAN CUNNINGHAM Jan Cunningham is a free-lance sports writer. She is a regular contributor to Breakthrough. $lims' $tart Yes, Virginia, there is a tennis tournament for women and you can give large thanks to promoter Gladys Heldman. Interviewed during the recent Virginia Slims tournament in Houston, Heldman said the circuit began six years ago when tennis pro Jack Kramer held a tournament in California. The prize money was $50,000 for men and $5,000 for women - a ten to one ratio. Billie Jean King and Rosie Casals didn't like it. Neither did Gladys Heldman. King and Casals asked Heldman about boycotting Kramer's tournament, but the promoter decided instead to hold another one: for women. Eight other players came to the Houston Racquet Club and played for $7,500 - which, according to Heldman, was a "tremendous amount in those days." All the players, however, were immediately suspended by the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association (USLTA). "They were told they couldn't play in any other tournaments and would not be eligible for ranking," Heldman said. "So I decided to start another circuit, and it became known as the Virginia Slims." "Men players, promoters and officials felt that women players would never attract a crowd," Heldman said. "So they played the women's matches at 10 a.m. and the men's matches at 2 p.m. prime time, with men getting 10 to 15 times more prize money than the women. But Billie Jean King and Rosie Casals proved that the public will come out to women's tennis." The following year,, Heldman set up 24 tournaments - 10 sponsored by Virginia Slims and the rest sponsored by K-Mart, British Motor Cars, Barnett Banks and Four Roses. Heldman pointed out that there are many more women professionals today than in 1971, the current champs including Margaret Court, Chris Evert, Virginia Wade and Martina Navratilova. She also recommended watching the rise of Beth Norton, U.S. National Junior Champion; South Africa's Greer Stevens, Sue Barker from Great Britain, Lynn Epstein from Florida, and Regina Marsikova, who has a win over Navratilova. All of these women are 19 or younger. The rise of Gladys Heldman is also worth watching. The USLTA and WTA asked her to organize a circuit for women who "can't quite get into the Virginia Slims," and the result is the "Futures Circuit," with several hundred * women participants and backers in Texas and Florida. Crowds are turning out, not only for champion flights, but for preliminary flights and qualifying as well. Heldman is also handling the publicity for River Oaks - her first men's tournament and "quite a challenge." What else does this energetic and dedicated tennis promoter do? Right now, she's learning Japanese. And playing tennis, of course. Material for this article came from an interview by Michael Zeigfinger, publisher of Inside Tennis.