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Breakthrough 1976-02
Page 11
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Breakthrough 1976-02 - Page 11. February 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5260.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1976). Breakthrough 1976-02 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5260

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-02 - Page 11, February 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5260.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_514k.jpg
Transcript Arts and Reviews Films about women A selection of films by or about women will be shown the last weekend in February at the Rice Media Center. Of the four feature length fiction films, two are Canadian, one is German, and one is I- talian. There are also two short documentaries made in the U.S.: one about men, and one about prostitutes. The film about men, Men's Lives, was included because "it can be seen as an outgrowth of the women's movement." A Free Woman, A Sad Comedy. Thursday, February 26. Margarethe von Trotta and her husband wrote the screenplay for this film about a woman getting a divorce and struggling through a series of menial jobs in "a man's world." The Seduction of Mimi, Friday, February 27. Ms. Lina Wert- muller, one of Italy's best directors, presents this comedy about Sicilian machismo. Also showing is Hookers, a San Francisco documentary about prostitutes, filmed in collaboration with Margo St. James and Coyote, a rights group for prostitutes. Dream Life, (Saturday, February 28. Two young women, Virgini and Isabelle seek their ideal man, who turns out to be a my h, noi existent in the real world. Mirielle Dansereau won he Canadian Film Awards Cri ic's Prize for this film in 1973. Men's Lives is a documentary about masculinity in America. Kamouraska, Sunday, February 29. Genevieve Bujold stars in Kamouraska, directed by Claude Jutra, from the novel by Anne Hebert, about a woman who does not comform to her society's expectations. It is set in nineteenth century Quebec. There will be two showings each night: at 7:30 and 10. The Media Center is located at University Boulevard at Stocton Street. Admission is $1.00. Joni gives concert JONI MITCHELL At the beginning of her concert, Joni Mitchell's back up band, the L.A. Express, played by themselves, sometimes doing full force rock and roll, sometimes breaking off into soft sweet jazzy solos. The saxophone and electric keyboards were especially good, with bass, drums, and guitar providing a rhythmic background. Joni Mitchell came on stage and opened with "Fallin' in Love," "Twentieth Century Fox" and "Free Man in Paris" with L.A. Express backing her up. She did some solo work, singing with her guitar, and playing piano. When she got up from the piano, she said, "I guess you folks would rather boogie, wouldn't you." A few people yelled approval to that, so she said, "Okay, then we're going to cut out half the show," and she walked off the stage. But she came right back, and played some more. There is a paradox when someone like Joni Mitchell plays in a place like the Coliseum. There is only a small percentage of such a large audience that can hear well enough to appreciate her great vocals and her solo piano. From where I was sitting, I could hear well enough to recognize the familiar music, but not well enough to hear the words. In a place like that, at least everyone can hear the electric instruments. The Coliseum is more appropriate for "boogie" than for a Joni Mitchell concert. I come away from such a concert feeling that it would have been better to spend the money on an album than on the concert, unless you can get terrific seats. Joni Mitchell is an outstanding musician; she writes her own music, her own wonderful lyrics, and she has an amazing voice, which she controls like a musical instrument. But now that everyone knows that she is great, her concerts suffer from her popularity. Dates set Becky Greene, producer, and Becky Bonar, director, are presenting "Beyond the Fringe" the weekends of February 12-14 and February 19-21, at the Main Street Theatre at Autrey House. This play was enthusiastically received last summer and is being revived, with some new material. On March 12 and 13 and March 16-20, Green and Bonar will offer "The Confidential Clerk," Part VII of an Eliot Cycle. Tickets for these productions are $2.50 each. Curtain time is 8 p.m., at Autrey House, 6265 Main. For more information or reservations, call 524-3168. Becky Greene is also guest- directing "Jumpers" for the Rice University Players, running February 9-14 in Hamman Hall on the Rice campus. For more information on this production, call 527-4040. Isabelle and Virginia, a film production assistant and a film animator, are rooxamates in Mireille Dansereau's DREAM LIFE. Play's issues outdated Scenes from American Life. A play written by A. R. Curney, produced by Nina Vance, directed by William Trotman. Alley Theatre. Scenes from American Life, was presented free to the public in the Arena Stage at the Alley Theatre. The free production was "presentedin supportof the Alley Theatre's Intern Program Fund, which offers on the job training for young actors." It was also presented to attract new customers to the Alley. People who in the past have avoided or ignored the Alley for whatever reason, might come to a free production, and thereafter become regular customers. It is interesting that this particular play was chosen for the "freebee" public. It is extremely critical of the American upper classes, and very peesimistic politically. As far as sexism goes, it presents several offensive stereotypes of women, but in general, most of the characters in the play are unpleasant, the men much more so than the women. The play is a montage of brief' vignettes, beginning in the past, progressing to the "present," and projecting into a very dismal future. The first scene is a christening, with unwanted advice from a drunken godmother. An uncle uses bribery and intimidation to "cure" his nephew's stammering. A speeding ticket is fixed for someone with the right connections. Competition and martial rivalry are demonstrated tennis tournament. A married couple have a horrible fight when ■ she tells him she is pregnant. At a group therapy session, the therapist freaks out. And in dancing class, the battle between the sexes starts early. By the second act, the child with the inauspicious christening and his contemporaries are entering college, apparently in the late sixties. As the play progresses through the "present," (it was first produced in 1970)and projects into the future, it loses credibility and becomes dated. As the play approaches 1970, a college student's mother decides to try her son's marijuana. A high school girl is given the choice between college and a coming-out party. A father urges his son to stand trial for his crime, but the son prefers to go underground. A middle-aged woman wants to fulfill her desire to sing the aria of Lucia, who married the wrong man. A couple receives a call from their daughter who is living in a commune, and is "never coming back." Paranoia builds: men are talking of "getting a few extra guns" and "getting across to Canada." And finally in a contrived scene, a family sings "It was sad when the old shop went down," as a dismal prediction of the future. The play was first performed in Tangle wood, Massachusetts six years ago. I think the play would have been more effective then. It reminded me of 1970, when the war was escalating, men were going underground to avoid the draft, and people were em- migrating to Canada in large numbers. Now, in 1976, it looks dated, simply because it was timely in 1970. Perhaps in another 10 years, it would be more interesting again, as a slice of history. Because it was history: OUR MALE FRIENDS WERE BEING THREATENED BY THE DRAFT. Now that the Ballet film to show "The Immortal Swan", a 1935 film of Anna Pavlova, Prima Ballerina of the Ballet Russe, will be presented free, Sunday, March 7, at 1 and 4 p.m., in the Brown Auditorium of the Museum of Fine Arts. This film will be shown on a first-come, first-served basis. Doors will open 30 minutes prior to showtime. draft is gone, I wish that Nina Vance would think about herstory and the biggest issue of 1976: the women's movement. Isbin stars The Houston Classic Guitar Society opened its 1976 season with a concert by Sharon Isbin. Now nineteen, she has been playing guitar since the age of nine. She has studied with Alirio Diaz in Banff, Canada, and with Oscar Ghiglia for four summers at the Aspen Music Festival. In the summers of 1974 and 1975 she made recital tours of Germany, and received enthusiastic acclaim. At "Guitar '75", held in Toronto, Canada, in June 1975, she won first prize in the International Guitar Competition. She is now a sophomore at Yale University, majoring in music. For her recital Isbin played works by Paganini, Purcell, and Bach. After intermission, she played five twentieth century pieces by Stephen Dodgson, Isaac Albeniz, Mario Castelnuovo, Leo Brouwer, and Antonio Lauro. She showed virtuostic techniques for this wide-ranging repertoire. The most interesting composition was "Canticum" by Leo Brouwer, a Cuban avant-garde composer and poet. It is a piece to be seen in concert rather than heard on record, for it is a visual as well as musical experience. At certain points in the piece, the guitarist flutters her fingers silently about the neck and strings of the guitar. It was an enjoyable bit of theatre in an otherwise formal concert. A taped interview will be broadcast on Pacifica, KPFT, at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, February 18. For information about the Houston Classic Guitar Society, and future concerts, call Susan Gaschen at 528-5666. ADELAIDE MOORMAN is a freelance writer on the arts. II