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Breakthrough 1976-02
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Breakthrough 1976-02 - Page 10. February 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 11, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5259.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1976). Breakthrough 1976-02 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5259

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-02 - Page 10, February 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 11, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5259.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Breakthrough 1976-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_514j.jpg
Transcript HEALTH continued from page 6 you no longer have a uterus and are not a member of this at-risk group. Although some leading gynecologists have adopted a "wait-and-see" attitude ("But keep taking your Premarin"), an editorial in Lancet concludes that the "only possible recommendation is that all candidates for long term estrogen replacement should have a hysterectomy-not a very attractive prospect." Premarin is the most commonly used estrogen replacement, and if it makes the difference between misery and enjoyment in your life, perhaps that small risk is worth taking. Besides, according to one professor of gynecology, there are certain unanswered statistical questions about these reports. For example, if those women who got cancer were given the drug to regulate Weeding (which in itself is a flag for possible cancer), it's possible they were already an at-risk group. If, however, your reasons for taking Premarin are purely sosmetic - to prevent dry skin ;ind wrinkling, for example (and it is often given for this reason), perhaps you ought to reconsider. Most gynecologists agree with the "New England Medical Journal" advice that women with intact uteruses on Premarin be "monitored". But that is not as simple as it sounds. A Pap Test (scraping of the cervix) is not a reliable test for endometrial cancer as it was positive or a typical in only 26 percent of one group of known cases. Screening for endometrial cancer is usually done by endometrial biopsy, an office procedure resembling menstrual extraction which is expensive and often uncomfortable (similar to inserting or removing an IUD). It's something that few women will opt for regularly. Moreover, since Premarin itself often causes breakthrough bleeding, it may be costly in time and money to keep returning for check-ups unless the benefits clearly outweigh the hassles and risks. If there is a particular women's health subject you would like to see covered in this column, please write "Health Hotline," c- o Breakthrough. Wendy Haskell Meyer is a freelance writer. She is a Contributing Editor to Texas Monthly, and the Houston correspondent for The National Observer. Editor's note: WOMEN'S HEALTH HOTLINE is a monthly feature article about our bodies. We plan to investigate and report on a different area of health each month. Only by de-mystifying the medical mysteries of our bodies will we gain control over our lives. A first! A FIRST! Bette Pesikoff, an attorney was elected this month to the office of President of the West Edgemont Civic Club. She is the first woman to hold this position. 10 Portia's Law Patti O'Kane is an ACLU attorney and a partner in Houston's first feminist law firm, Gerhardt and O'Kane. This is the second of a two-part series about the recent credit laws and when they will be implemented and what their effect will be on women. In future issues we will examine different areas of the law. If you have any areas that are of special interest to you. or an aspect that you will like to see covered in this, our legal forum, PLEASE LET US KNOW'Write Breakthrough. The following discriminatory acts by creditors are prohibited by the Regulations: 1. Applying different standards of creditworthiness or conditions of credit with respect to any aspect of a credit transaction on the basis of sex or marital status; 2. Assigning a value to sex or marital status in a credit scoring or point-scoring plan; 3. Requesting, requiring or using information about birth control practices, childbearing or childrearing intentions or ability; 4. Failing to consider alimony, child support or maintenance payments in the same manner as income from salary, wages or other source where the payments are received pursuant to a written agreement or court decree and the payments are likely to be consistently made in the future; 5. Applying different standards on the basis of the sex or marital status of the sole or principal supporter of a family unit; 6. Discounting all or any part of the income of an applicant or, where applicable, the income of an applicant's spouse on the basis of sex or marital status; 7. Terminating credit or imposing new conditions of credit on an existing account because of a change in the applicant's marital status without evidence of any unfavorable change in the applicant's financial circumstances 8. Failing to extend credit to a qualified applicant in any legal name designated by the applicant. This includes the applicant's birth-given first name and surname of a birth- given first name and combined surname; 9. Publishing any advertisement which, in effect, discourages applicants because of sex or marital status; 10. Failing to consider the credit history of a "family account" on which the applicant was an authorized user, if the applicant would be denied credit without such consideration; 11. Failing to establish separate accounts for qualified married applicants. Credits are given additional time under the Regulations to revamp their discriminatory record keeping systems, and they now have until November 1, 1976, before they must keep separate credit records on married persons; 12. Requesting or requiring the signature of a spouse when the individual applicant meets the creditor's standards of creditworthiness without such a signature. The following credit requests are allowed by the Equal Credit Opportunity Act: 1. A creditor may inquire as to the marital status of an applicant if the creditor routinely makes such an inquiry of both men and women. 2. A creditor may request and consider any information concerning an applicant's spouse which may be considered about the applicant, if, the spouse will be permitted to use the account, or if the spouse will be contractually liable upon the account, or if the applicant is relying on community property or the spouse's income as a basis for repayment of the credit requested. 3. The Regulations allow married persons to establish separate credit, and where an applicant seeks credit and does not rely on the creditworthiness of a spouse, a creditor may request and consider only the name and address of the non-applicant spouse, whether the spouses are separa ed, and the amount of debts owed by the non- applicant spouse. 4. A creditor may request the signature of both spouses only when the applicant has insufficient earnings or property under his-her own management-control to qualify for tne credit extension. The Equal Credit Opportunity Act is a major breakthrough in our vigorous attact on sexist credit practices on a national level. While all portions of the act are not presently operative, and therefore cannot be enforced, you should be sure to contact the ACLU, the Women's Equity Action League, the National Organization for Women, or any other local or national organization for assistance. WEAL and NOW have published useful credit kits in monitoring sexism in credit extension. A booklet entitled "Women and Credit" - An Annotated Bibliography" is available for $1.00 from the Center for Women's Policy Studies, 2000P Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006. RESTAURANTS continued from page 3 woman. And it's particularly ridiculous if it happens to be the woman who is familiar with the restaurant, and she is going to order for the rest of the party. Another aspect of this syndrome is wine-tasting, a ceremony almost unfailingly reserved for male patrons-not unlike the administering of the sacraments. Even if a woman chooses and orders the wine, waiters and waitresses and sommeliers alike feel compelled to offer it up to a man for approval. I can recall only two restaurants-the Hyatt Regency's Window Box and The Stables - where I've ordered wine AND been allowed to pass judgment on it myself. In both instances I was flabbergasted that protocol had been bypassed in the name of good sense. Then there's the bill. When the check arrives, waiters and waitresses, like so many Pavlovian dogs, present it to the man. This can prove needlessly awkward when a woman is taking a business contact to lunch, say, but at least the days when one felt obliged to slip money under the table to one's male companion are over. Well, almost over. A waiter at Zorba's has been known to throw a minor fit when a man and woman attempt to split the tab. "It would not happen in Greece," he argued heatedly, and no doubt he is correct. Thankfully, there are a few restaurants in town where the check is placed judiciously in neutral territory. If there's a wave of the future in tab etiquette, let's hope this is it. THE BACK-Of-THE-BUS SYNDROME This is what often happens to women together, students or people who used to be lumped together as hippies. Mostly it happens in restaurants that view themselves as having "class": You walk in, wait to be seated while the maitre d' or hostess scrutinizes; you, and are forthwith conducted to the furthest reaches of the dining room. Women who look extremely rich or extremely decorative generally do not meet this fate. If you're recognizably famous you most certainly will not be hidden away; otherwise, you may find yourself athwart the kitchen door. That was the unenviable spot alloted to my younger sister and myself at Brennan's one morning. We were treated to a ceaseless swinging of doors, a parade of waiters who clustered together talking shop (boring, I might add), and a horrendous clanking from the kitchen. The strange thing was that there were only a few other people in the restaurant, ana they were rather more felicitously situated. Even our wine glasses arrived literally dripping with water, which-in a restaurant that prides itself on excellent service-could lead a person to believe she is considered to be of little account. Maybe if we'd worn business suits. THE PAWNS-IN-THE-GAME SYNDROME This one, like Back-of-the-Bus, affects women together, students and those deemed to be riffraff. It involves being shuffled about from one table to another so as to leave the choicest spots open for those mythical SuperCustomers who must surely be just around the next corner. Two friends of mine were seated at a round table-imagine the gall!-in Renata's recently. Business was slack and showed no signs of picking up. The night manager, however, nervous that these two young women were taking up a table meant for four, asked them to move, cocktails and all. No courtesies or apologies or drinks on the house for their trouble. It was decreed. Picking up stakes in a restaurant is never pleasant, but in a near-empty one it seems downright inhospitable. On their departure (the place was still underpopulated) the two women mentioned that they were less than pleased with this shoddy treatment and might think twice before returning. They were told that was just fine. Maybe they should have worn business suits. THE LITTLE-LADY SYNDROME This is the reverse of not-so- benign neglect. Under the Little Lady Syndrome (which surfaces mainly, in less-than-high-flown eateries), women dining together are subjected to an excess of attention: either a wash of folksy concern (honey-ing, when are you going to get all that hair cut- ing, when are you going to get married-ing) or a barrage of flirting and pointed comments from waiters-managers-owners convinced that women would rather be flattered and teased than left in peace. If male patrons get this treatment in substantial doses, I have yet to observe it. UNE FEMME SEULE A young woman I know decided to have dinner-by herself- at Casa Poli, which has recently changed hands. As she entered, she was approached inquiringly by a staff member who finally managed to blurt out "Yes?"-as if she suspected this lone female of selling magazine subscriptions or distributing Seventh-Day- Adventist tracts. Anything but having dinner alone! Once seated, an unac- companeed woman is liable to be the subject of curiosity and unnerving stares. Especially, God help her, if it is Friday or Saturday night, when seemingly the entire human race has paired or at least grouped off. There are remedies, however imperfect, for these various affronts. In the case of Non- Personhood, simply speaking up (on the order of "I'd like to taste the wine," or "I'm paying") usually is effective, and may even give a waiter pause. Becoming indignant or visibly insulted may leave a more lasting impression on the offenders, but invariably ruins the meal and torpedoes the service. A certain obstinancy seems to help when Back-of-the-Bus or Pawns rear their ugly heads. Nobody says you have to go along with the program. Waiters and maitre d's can be horribly intimidating, but one can get around them. As to the unpleasantnesses of dining alone, one can either avoid looking around or develop a steely stare and use it liberally. If you're not up to the crowd at Leo's, there's always the anonymity of a Romana Cafeteria or even the Mariposa Room at Neiman Marcus, where it's the male customers who feel...funny.