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Breakthrough 1976-02
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Breakthrough 1976-02 - Page 5. February 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5254.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1976). Breakthrough 1976-02 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5254

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-02 - Page 5, February 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5254.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_514e.jpg
Transcript Classy restaurants dish out second-rate service to women By Alison Cook Female Houstonians have long been granted the dubious privilege of lunching in Foley's erstwhile Men's Grill and wearing pants into the posh confines of the Warwick Club's dining room. Lest we congratulate ourselves prematurely, however, consider that the more pervasive and annoying day-to-day trials endured by women in restaurants are not the sort that can be legislated out of existence. Waiter's indifference, bad tables and a steadfast refusal to believe that a woman might actually pay the check &re among the aggravations that are destined to linger on and on, like a summer cold or a very old soldier - the vestiges of lifetime layers of prescribed etiquette, decorum, role-assumptions and plain old economic self-interest (specifically the tip, of which more later). I speak of these ills advisedly. For some years I have reviewed restaurants for kcal publications, and in the course of my researches I have had more than enough time to reflect on the unhappy fact that women are treated quite, quite differently from men when it comes to dining out. This is particularly true when said women are either noticeably young or do not have the good fortune to look Yves-St. Laurenty, I've got-a-Mercedes- waiting-outside expensive. Which brings us to money and the dread Tip, the root of much evil in these matters. For whatever reasons (a history of household penny-pinching or a lack of a certain macho ex- pansiveness when it comes time to buy cigars and bestow gratuities on the help, maybe) women have the reputation of being bad tippers. There may be more women these days in the upper income brackets, but a wraiter who's hustling for his 15, 20 or maybe even 25 percent is not acting on demographics. He's acting on gut instinct* and that instinct tells him (correctly or not) that the guy wining and dining a client, or the one romancing a female friend at a corner table, are going to be good for a bigger bill and a bigger tip than the two women who just walked in together. Thus are priorities born. The second-classing of women in restaurants had numerous interesting manifestations. Some of the more bothersome ones are: THE NON-PERSON DROME SYN- This behavior complex is common to waiters and waitresses in all restaurants, not just the pricey ones. It's denoted by little eye contact with the female (s) in the dining party, frequent turning to the male (s) for corroboration while the women order, and automatic addressing of the male (alias "sir") with regard to further amenities during the meal. At least half the time it is assumed that trie male will order for his female companion. This is more than faintly ridiculous, since this doesn't allow for personal specifications or questions on the part of the Continued on page 10 0© KlTtHerV OVEE5 EMPLOYEES/» ONLy TSU child care Due to the increased number of women in the work force and the rise in the number of single- parent households, child care has become a prominent social issue. According to the Office of Early Childhood Development, Texas Department of Community Affairs, there were 420,000 children in need of day care in Texas in 1974. In trying to meet the needs of student-parents as well as those of the urban community, Texas Southern University is instituting an on-campus child care facility. According to Charles R. Walker, Dean of Students, a prefabricated structure will be provided to initially house the development, but there are hopes that a permanent structure will evolve in the future. Not strictly a "day care" facility, the T.S.U. program is planning to offer evening as well as weekend care. Fees for the services will be on a sliding scale basis but there is support for a cooperative arrangement in which a parent may work at the child care facility in lieu of payment for his or her own child care services. A current emphasis of child care programs is that the care provided be of an educational-as well as custodial-nature. Programmed trips, both recreational and cultural, are planned as part of the child care curriculum at T.S.U., and transportation needs for these activities have already been anticipated. Another proposed feature of the T.S.U. program is the inclusion of hot meals and-or snacks for the children. Dean Walker reports that survey data have been gathered from student-parents to help determine the various needs they may have for child care. The data wiL be used to solicit foundation and federal funds to help support the project. Students of the Home Economics Department will staff the program initially, but a work- study program has also been considered that, according to Dean Walker, would provide the most solid source of federal funding. The project will be under the direction of Bobbie Henderson of the Home Economics Department and Alma Alexander, Administrative Assistant to the Dean of Students. Ailene English ADA LOUISE HUXTABLE Ada Louise Huxtable, architecture critic of the NEW YORK TIMES, gave a lecture entitled, "The City: The Impossible Dream" at Hamman Hall auditorium on the Rice campus last month. It was her first visit to Houston and she said she was in "culture shock." To her, Houston and New York represent two polarities: New York being "unpardonably arrogant," and Houston being "proudly defensive." She added that "New York is broke and losing population and thus its tax base, while Houston is becoming a new economic and political center, and gaining population." However, she denied any simplistic analyses or answers to the urban situation. A city is "a mirror of society," and therefore complex, she said. She described' New York as "molded in the iron grid of nineteenth century mass transit." In twentieth century Houston, the freeway is the "core of life where products from Detroit dominate the city." The old cities, she says, are not in their death throes, but in transition. She calls history "the continuing process of becoming." Huxtable laments that the only examples of architecture in Houston are the financial and commercial buildings, and those of institutionalized culture. Reid misconstrued A "misinterpretation" of a speech by Australian feminist Elizabeth Reid has led several media women to file a formal complaint with the National News Council, criticizing UPI's coverage of the address. The complaint concerns Austin UPI's reporter Ann Arnold's story on Reid's address, delivered at the Austin Conference on Women in Public Life last November. Reid, former advisor to the Australian prime minister, spoke to women striving for power, warning them that their sexual favors were still expected as payment for a promotion or favorable vote. Speaking with great emotion, Reid charged that women are still treated as sex objects by the press and high officials, and are expected to put out as a "call girl." Her language was explicit and shocking to some, but her message was clear: "Beware of being expected to behave like a loose woman in top level barbaining." The UPI story, however, had Reid practically advocating prostitution. The first paragraph read, "Sex is the easiest and most effective route to political power for women, according to an Australian feminist." Completely misconstrued, Reid appeared to be urging women to sleep their way to political power. The incongruity of the wire story is even more pronounced when it correctly continued that Reid's speech was given a standing ovation by an audience that included Lady Bird Johnson, U. S. District Judge Sarah T. Hughes, and many other women presently serving as legislators, mayors and other elected or appointed officials. Arnold explained that her critical lead paragraph was misinterpreted by a Dallas Regional UPI rewrite person and she was unable to correct the error. What happened in Arnold's words is more a "misunderstanding" than an "act of malice." But one conference participant lamented, "why is misunderstanding such a traditional feature of journalism in reporting on the women's movement?" The complaint was signed by members of the media panel of the conference, including Peg Simpson, president of the Washington Press Club, Sey Chassler, Editor-in-Chief of Redbook, and Susan Caudill of KERA-TV in Dallas. SUSAN CAUDILL is a reporter for KERA-TV, Dallas. c