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Breakthrough 1976-02
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Breakthrough 1976-02 - Page 3. February 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5252.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1976). Breakthrough 1976-02 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5252

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-02 - Page 3, February 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5266/show/5252.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_514c.jpg
Transcript 'Woman of the Month" By Kathryn Hooker DR. HORTENSE DIXON When Mayor Hofheinz appointed Dr. Hortense Dixon as Executive Assistant in January 1975, he set a precedent: she became the first Black in Houston's history to hold the job. Both her race and her sex, Dr. Dixon says, have influenced her work as the Mayor's liaison with the City's Health Department, the Federal Community Development, Model Cities, and Manpower programs. (She was recently assigned the Real Estate and Public Service departments as well.) "My very presence in this job has helped to sensitize people to the needs and viewpoints of ^minorities," Dr. Dixon said. She considers women a minority "because they are treated like one." Dr. Dixon sees herself as not only a symbol of minority participation in the political process, but also as a vocal advocate for the rights of minorities. "For as long as I can remember," Dr. Dixon recalls, "I've spoken out. I had difficulties in childhood because I would speak up, talk back to to my parents, disagree. In school I would disagree with teachers. I called a strike in college during World War II because the women were forced to wear ugly stockings. We won." During Poppy Northcutt's term as Women's Advocate, Dr. Dixon recalls, they worked closely together on several projects. "I felt a natural affinity for Poppy," Dr. Dixon says, "because she was Houston's first Women's Advocate and I was the first Black Executive Assistant to the Mayor. We talked out problems and discussed possible solutions. Poppy was a one- person staff with a secretary. It was an uphill battle to get anything done." Northcutt and Dr. Dixon attempted to remove provisions discriminatory to women from the city's health insurance policies. They worked on a report documenting discrimination in city employment. Their proposal to reclassify secretaries under Civil Service as administrative assistants is now being considered by City Council. "Secretaries can and do act as Fathers allege bias Texas Fathers for Equal Rights filed suit in federal court recently against all Dallas county and state judges who hear child custody cases, charging that in the majority of divorces, fathers are being deprived of the right to a personal and legal relationship with their children. The association, which has about 500 members statewide, charges that judges are violating the due process and equal protection clauses of the Constitution in making custody decisions which discriminate against men. There are six named plaintiffs, but the suit is a class action filed on behalf of all fathers who feel discriminated against in Texas custody cases. Ed C. Loutman, attorney for TFER, asks in the complaint that any judge's ruling, state law, or legal precedent which deprives fathers of equal custody rights be declared unconstitutional. Bill Shelton, a plaintiff and president of TFER, said after the suit was filed that children have the right to a relationship with both mother and father, unless one is deemed an "unfit" parent He argued that while child custody should probably be granted to as many fathers as mothers, the optimum arrangement in most cases would be a "joint custody" where both parents share legal and personal privileges. At present, mothers are awarded custody in 85 to 99 percent of the cases, Shelton pointed out. Unless they are considered "unfit," they are almost automatically awarded child custody while the father's parental qualifications are not considered. Shelton said that children are suffering from "paternal deprivation" because of biased judges and case laws. The result, he said, according to a number of studies, is everything from juvenile delinquency and poor school achievement to promiscuity in children. Shelton said there are about 18,000 divorce cases in Dallas County, about two-thirds involving children. He said there are about 192,000 Texas families headed by single women, many of which are situations where the child is deprived of an adequate relationship with the father because of custody decisions. Former TFER President Ed Cullum explained that the group is not interested in preferential, but equal treatment for fathers. He said Texas Fathers for Equal Rights has the endorsement of feminist groups such as the Dallas County chapter of NOW, and is also interested in helping women obtain court-ordered child support when the father is failing to contribute. SUSAN CAUDILL Information in this article was reported by Susan Caudill and reprinted from a newscast on KERA-TV, Dallas, Texas. administrators at times," Dr. Dixon explains, "but they get no credit for it." (Her own secretary, Kay Kazmir, sits at a desk piled as high with work as Dr. Dixon's. Kazmir is continually on the phone or talking with Dr. Dixon's visiting associates, and it is obvious to anyone entering the office that Kazmir's work is more than clerical.) Dr. Dixon, too, is always on the phone, conferring with associates in her office or attending meetings. Her days are tightly organized, sometimes down to the quarter-hour. She may have business meetings at lunch. She may discuss programs with officials by phone or at her home, on weekends. Asked about her hobbies, she replies: "I have none now. I have no time. I used to enjoy sewing and reading. I don't like to read when I get home now because I've been reading all day at work. Work has become my hobby." Her daily contacts may include the Mayor; his other executive assistants; Walter Jones, Director of Houston's Model Cities Program; Palmer Bowser, Director of the Manpower Program; Albert Randall, Director of the City's Health Department; Curiel McFadden of the Community Relations Division; and officials from a multitude of other divisions, departments and programs. She also talks continually to friends, former associates, community leaders, and people who have been given her name to call for help with a problem. During some 24 years of involvement in community projects and volunteer political work, she has come to know many people. "I've been able to contribute to the community because I do have the ability to listen," she says. "And I'm in a position to share with the community my Eggquality no yolk Dallas area NOW members have once again shown that feminist cooking doesn't mean 'bra-beques.' Encouraged by Dallas County NOW to help shatter the media's image of the combat-boot, homehating feminist, several Dallas women entered the State Fair of Texas Cooking Contest, and came home with a lot more than broiled bra. Five radical feminists took the following prizes: "Best in Show" for a casserole named "Charlotte's Liberated Equal Rights Amendment Casserole," and two first places- one tor a casserole and one for "Feminist Fruit Salad." Other awards include a second place in cream puffs; three third places in danish, divinity and cookies; and two fourth places for fruit and meat salad. Winning entries also included "Liberated Shrimp Salad," "Amazon Avocado Supreme," "Feminist French Dressing," "Pankhurst's Pineapple Parfait" and that all-time-favorite "Last Minute Liberated Women's Salad." Some of the ribbons this year and last were won by Martha Dickey, Meri Westegaarde, Jane Baker, Charlotte Taft and Marge Schucate. No one knows to date whether Women Who Want to be Women garnered any prizes. knowledge of the processes of government - how it works„what the procedures are that they need to know." Her many years of work in the community and her knowledge of urban planning have borne fruit in Dr. Dixon's ability to help coordinate federally-funded programs with existing city departments, dealing with what to the inexperienced seems a confusing welter of overlapping functions. One of the projects she's most proud of is the Riverside Health Clinic. Located at Holman and Elgin (it's attached to Riverside General Hospital by walkways), Riverside is already being staffed and will be ready for service in a few weeks. "The Clinic is a public facility for low-and moderate-income people," says Walter Jones of Model Cities, who worked with Dr. Dixon and others on the project. "It will bill patients on aA- sliding scale." Jones points out that the facility will ease traffic from the Third Ward to Ben Taub, which is often overcrowded. Services will be financed partly by the city and partly by federal money through the Model Cities Program. The city and the county will cooperate in running the Clinic. Other favorite projects of Dr. Dixon's: two multi-purpose centers now being developed in part with Model Cities funds, one in the West End and one in the Fifth Ward. The centers will provide basically the same much- needed services: programs for senior citizens and for preschoolers; legal aid; offices for the State Department of Public Welfare; and general meeting space and office space for agencies and individuals. Dr. Dixon also speaks with pride of the complex of programs implemented last summer for~ low-income youngsters, financed in part with federal funds through the Manpower Program. Thousands of young people were matched with public-service jobs, jobs with some 50 private businesses, and jobs in the city's Parks Department. Dr. Dixon's job encompasses a multitude of other projects through each of the major programs and departments she helps coordinate. Community Development a five-year federal program headed in Houston by John Castillo, will use federal money to improve housing largely for Houston's low- and moderate-income families. Last year, communities throughout the city elected commissioners to represent the communities' wishes in implementing the program. Meetings are to be held in each neighborhood for citizens to voice their needs to the commissioners. Trie first year, the program will concentrate on Houston's areas of greatest need: the Heights; Acres Homes; Near Northside- Fifth Ward; Denver Harbor-Port Houston-Navigation; Foster Place-South Park-MacGregor; the Third Ward; and Magnolia. Demolition of dangerous buildings will be speeded up. Property owners whose homes Continued on page 13