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Breakthrough 1976-03
Page 12
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Breakthrough 1976-03 - Page 12. March 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4730/show/4725.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1976). Breakthrough 1976-03 - Page 12. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4730/show/4725

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-03 - Page 12, March 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4730/show/4725.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-03
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 3
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 12
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_515l.jpg
Transcript MURAL continued from page 1 artists and individuals coordinating the project were aware the murals were to be temporary." j Castellon says there was a "verbal agreement" that the mural would stay up for six months at Moody Park but that it would then travel to other parks. Ann Lower, assistant to City Parks and Recreation Director George Lanier, says the original idea was that it would be a mobile installation. Later a fixed pole installation was agreed on by artist Leo Tanguna who oversaw the Moody Park mural project as well as by Ken Robinson, the artist of a mural project at Emancipation Park. In any event,Lower, is definite the agreement was to have a temporary display in the park and later to move it to a community center. "That is the only way," she says, "I could get approval on the content of the Moody Park mural. I saved the theme when it was questioned whether we should be using tax payers money to go into social issues in a community that was divided on the issue of women's rights." That is the real issue, Castellon feels. "Lanier turned down my first sketches because he said they were 'too one-sided.' They only showed the struggle of women. He said they didn't represent the people." Castellon said she felt the art mural which Lanier approved in Emancipation Park was also 'too one-sided" and told him so because it only showed the role of the Black male in history. Castellon says that Lanier met only with them that one time and that after he told them4■ if I let you put up a billboard on city park land about the Chicana's struggles, I'll have to give the Ku Klux Klan equal space for their murals," she and the other Chicanos present walked out of the meeting. Lanier claims there was no walk-out and recalls having a "congenial meeting." Yet, soon after that meeting, Castellon and Torres issued a press release (dated June 3,1975) which called attention to sexist discriminatory practices in the City's Parks and Recreation Department and specifically attacked Lanier for "discrimination against women by refusing to allow...art on public property simply because of its feminist theme (while) at the same time he...en- thusiatically approved public art that subordinated women to men." The release further stated Lanier "violated public law that explicitly forbids use of federal funds when such discrimination is practiced." They were ready to release it when Lanier "changed his mind." Castellon feels Ann Lower is the reason Lanier changed his mind. "She (Lower) really wanted the mural to be done according to our sketches. She felt it was important in that Houston had never had anything like this." Moving left to right the mural in three panels depicts the traditional view of Mexican- American woman-mother, wife, Virgin Mary; it portrays a woman in shackles with education denied her; it shows a woman in Christ's image on the cross and it shows finally, the emerging woman—athlete, scholar, artist, professional woman. A poem by Rosita Morales appears predominantly in the center. THe artists represent women as Christ because they say, "Just like Jesus was crucified by his own people, women have been 'crucified' by their own people. By denying women the right to education the Mexican American woman has been held back. But our mural represents the hope that once we are educated we can fight the battle of discrimination together with our males." Rosita Morales' poem says, "Your brown sweat irrigates the ditch...carrying within your inside the nation's embryo...Brown woman, you are culturally gifted...created out of a rib in the bronze race... your actions have been seen...history reflects your self-reliant courage...and honors a contrast that is—Mexican-American woman." Lanier says, "Everybody's trying to make this a woman's rights issue, but the same would apply to other issues. A park is not the place to take an issue and express it. It is not a campaign area. Billboards have no place in a park. "How do you," he asks, "control what someone decides they want to put on a billboard? What may not be offensive to one person may, indeed, be offensive to someone else." He says he objected to the Moody Park mural "because of the fact that it was even making a statement at all." "The one at Emancipation Park," Lanier continues, "talked about the heritage of the Blacks. There was a full conglomerate montage of individuals in that. Now, that's shall we say a safe theme. Parks are everything to everybody. Because of that you've got to stay fairly vanilla. You've got to stay fairly middle of the road." The disposition of the mural is still in question. LINDFORS continued from page 6 have it harder than ever because they are not even special any longer. When I look around me I think of my aunt, who was a mutation in a way. She could not cope with putting work and love together. Society didn't really allow her to do it. I just read something by a woman writer who writes to the man who asked her to marry him, and this was in the beginning of the century: She said, "I am sorry I cannot marry you because if I did, I would have to commit myself totally to dealing with a house, having children, etc., and I have already committed myself to writing and I cannot take myself out of." It didn't occur to her that she could do both. But I think women are aware now that they don't really have to pay a price; they can have both. BARNSTONE: You hardly ever see an older woman on TV. If they have a woman news anchor, she will be young, but you frequently find older men in that same position - Walter Cronkite, for example, is in his 60's. What do you think of older women in the theater? LINDFORS: That was part of my dilemmma as an actress. Once you get past 35, there really are no good roles available for you. Also when you get to that age yourself, you have to portray women who are bitter, lonely and angry. You hate to have to portray your own sex in that way. I used to be the loving woman in my roles - wonderful, no matter what. Once past 35,1 wasn't such a nice person any longer. It's ridiculous. But it's changing. It's got to change. Women over 35 should demand to see themselves. BARNSTONE: Have you found that there has been a change in thinking and attitude in communities where you have performed? LINDFORS: Yes, the change is tremendous, even in the last two years. It's almost as if it is quite official that the change is here. And I think that men too, all over the country, are becoming terribly aware that it is their movement as well as the women's and that, of course, is essential. We won't really have total change until they realize that the change has to come within them too. SHIRLEY A.GIBSON, M.Ed. Marriage, and Family Counseling 3303 Louisiana Suite 212A 527-0712 Home 626-2165 12QD wala You are invited to a BUSINESS WOMEN'S BREAKFAST CLUB every Thursday morning 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. Travel Lodge 310 South Heights Purpose: To meet other women in business and to develop business contacts. For more information: Contact Marilyn Elam 528-3825 Titles for today's thinking woman Against Our Will The New Assertive Woman Notes of a Feminist Therapist Liberating Masturbation Getting Clear Circle One iiyuwJ ULL'S SANDWICHES OF HEROIC PROPORTION 9457 Kempwood at Campbell 462-8210 Support our Advertisers They Support Breakthrough 12