Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Breakthrough 1976-03
Page 8
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Breakthrough 1976-03 - Page 8. March 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 10, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4730/show/4721.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1976). Breakthrough 1976-03 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4730/show/4721

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-03 - Page 8, March 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 10, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4730/show/4721.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-03
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 3
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_515h.jpg
Transcript Pats and Pans A strange thing happened to KEYH news reporter Deborah Wrigley en route to cover the federal court trial of six police officers. She was stopped on the freeway in her news car by a City of Houston police officer who was driving a three-wheel motorcycle. He handed her a business card which said, "Don't PANic. Be cool. The man who hands you this card is a police officer. Just lie on your back and do everything the nice officer tells you to do." He rode away before she could get his badge and-or license plate number. PAN-it! A headline in a Sunday February 8 edition of the Houston Chronicle ran as follows: "Unhappy Female-headed Families in U.S. Soaring." The lead line read as follows: "Soaring divorce rates, spurred in part by economic opportunities that have allowed women to escape unhappy marriages, have almost doubled the proportion of female-headed, single-parent families..." The article, a solid report by economist Isabel Sawhill, called for the need for better earnings for women, more equitable systems of welfare, alimony, and child support, and greater supports such as day care. Never any mention of unhappy females, only marriages! Galveston City Council has a tradition of appointing the council member with the highest number of votes to serve as mayor pro-tem. This year, however, that tradition bit the dust when council member Edna Fuller was denied the post in a council vote even though she had received the most popular votes in the 1975 election. Mayor R.A. Apffel denied that she had been turned down because she is a woman, and suggested to the many people who protested on her behalf that if they don't like what's going on, they can change things next election. PAN the sunny beaches. Who wears the pants in County Criminal Court Judge Jimmie Duncan's court? As of now, anybody who wants to. Not so last week, though, when defendant Esther Rodriguez was given 30 minutes to go home and change clothes (from pants and blouse) and be back to face trial for possession of marijuana. When she returned late, Duncan raised her bond from $400 to $2500, which Rodriguez could not make, so he threw her in jail. Next day, State District Judge Lee Duggan accepted a $400 bond and the defendant was released until her trial date (March 18). PAT Channel 11's Nancy Carney and Channel 13's Elma Barrera, and Channel 2's Katherine Colvert for not skirting the issue. Duncan dropped all dress codes in his court and gave credit to women in the media for his change of attitude. The University of Cincinnati held a beauty pageant with a difference: all the contestants were male. They were required to parade in evening clothes and swimsuits, take part in a talent competition and answer the traditional "unrehearsed questions" from a female emcee, all as part of a "role reversal" experiment. Chris van Harlingen, the pageant producer, expressed the hope that the audience and participants would experience "a realization of just what male-female stereotyping is." The blushing winner, Greg Reinert, wore a swimsuit made of flowers and swallowed four goldfish in the talent competition. (Atlantic City, eat your heart out). Speaking of reversals, Reinert started off with half-formed wishes to win and ended up with half-warmed fishes within. PAT the pageant. PAT to the U.S. Olympic Team Committee who chose two women to carry the U.S. flag in Olympic ceremonies. A nation usually selects its best athlete for this event. Skier Cindy Nelson carried the flag in the opening ceremonies and speed skater Shelia Young carried it in the closing ceremonies. PAT to "Sports Illustrated" for their comment on ABC's Olympic Coverage: "If announcers feel compelled to name 'prettiest girls', why don't they get themselves assigned to the Miss Universe Contest?" 8 It's that headline writer at the Chronicle again! This time (February 24) it was "Girls Cry, But It's OK Says NAVY." In an article on women entering the 130-year old Naval Academy for the first time the headline writer went digging into the middle of the story to come up with one detail that "women (not girls) may cry more easily than men, not because they are weak but because it is culturally permitted for women (not girls) to cry; however, they probably will not cry for long." this headline writer is becoming a real PAN in our feminist side. PAT Local 408 of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workers, who last week sponsored a seminar to encourage labor union women to become more active in the decision and policymaking process of unions. The featured speaker was Addie Wyatt, Women's Affairs Director for the International AMCBW and one of Time Magazine's 12 Women of the Year for 1975. And a PAT to KHOU-TV, whose Alma Newsom was the only television reporter to cover the event. A PAT, by God, to Charlene Warnken, Post religion writer, who has been doing outstanding features on women in religion. Some of her subjects have been Effie Blair, ordained in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and now in charge of the minority constituencies of that church; Helen Havens, Episcopal priest; and Sister Frances Klinger, a Catholic nun in pastoral ministry. One article Warnken wrote recently on women entering the priesthood asked if God were an equal opportunity employer. The Religious Coalition for Abortion Rights (RCAR) is an organization representing 23 religious groups who have united to combat the massive campaign initiated by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops against abortion rights. Unitarian Universalist Association President Robert West, one of several religious leaders who met with the press, was quoted in the UU World (Feb. 15) as saying, "The proposed amendment to outlaw abortion is a direct attack on that freedom of belief which is protected by the First Amendment." The RCAR stands PAT on its conviction that abortion is a question that should be left to the belief and conscience of each individual. HL&P has finally seen the light...with a little assistance from U.S. District Judge Woodrow Seals. Judge Seals has issued a consent decree outlining future hiring and promotion goals for the Houston Lighting and Power Company. The decree was the result of a 1974 sex discrimination suit filed by three women against HL&P. Sweeping changes must be made and back pay will be made available to women claiming relief from alleged sex discrimination. A powerful PAT to the Judge. In last month's report on feminist prize-winners at the State Fair in Dallas (Eggquality No Yolk!) we failed to report our own Juneau Shepherd, Women's Advocate of the University of Houston. PAT Juneau for her two winners in candy, a blue ribbon (IstPrizs) in divinity, and a red ribbon (2nd Prize) in mints and for her second-prize winning Black Forest Cherry Cake. .Repeat a PAN for Post "humorist" Lynn Ashby, putting his breast foot forward again. Writing about the Salt Grass Trail Ride, he says, "At this point it should be noted that large-chested women look rather silly when riding a trotting horse." Interviewed on the "Tonight Show" last week, Peter Falk was bemoaning the fact that too much air time is being given the Hearst trial, and would prefer other news items be covered. For example, "A good rape is terrific!" Peter be PANned. In a recent "Doonesbury", a cartoon strip carried daily by the Houston Post, Andy announces to Joanie that he is gay. Joanie is shocked and upset, but not half as shocked and upset as the Post, which refused to print a week's worth of strips dealing with homosexuality. The reason given by managing editor Ed Hunter was that the subject was "inappropriate for a comic page strip." "Doonesbury" has been rated number one by the Post readers and has earned its creator, Garry Trudeau, a Pulitzer Prize. The Post rates a blue PANcil for presuming to make moral judgements for its readers. George Meany, 81, will be the only remaining member of the original AFL-CIO Executive Council when Joseph Kennan steps down in April. When asked if the all-male council might select a woman to fill one of the vacancies, he replied, "I don't plan to elevate a woman to anything. I've had a lifetime of domination by a wife and three daughters. PAN the old Meaney. PANasonic TV bloopers: Lawrence Grossman, president of PBS, was recently interviewed on CBS. Asked about the charge of "elitism" that is often leveled at public broadcasting, he replied, "Elitism is just fine as long as it can be spread to include everybody." And if that's not clear enough, consider the following pearl cast by Rod Steiger on the "People's Choice Awards" on CBS last week. He referred to Jimmy Stewart as "a gentleman for whom it's been an honor for me to be introduced by" Winston Churchill, where are you? "Are women important in the making of America? Don't consult the phone book," warns a recent issue of Ms. The Bell System's Bicentennial directory cover depicts '^typical" American faces. In addition to the symbolic Ms. Liberty and Uncle Sam and one serious representation of Marian Anderson, women are stereotypically portrayed as a housewife in curlers and Shirley Temple in curls (not as ambassador), a Spanish senorita with fan, Betsy Ross with needle and thread, a sexy phone operator with a handful of trunk lines, and Whistler's Mother in her lace cap. The male model roles? Jefferson, Lincoln, Washington, Mark Twain, Jackie Robinson, Will Rogers, Robert E. Lee, and naturally, Alexander Graham Bell. PAN Bell's number on women. The Wall Street Journal ran the following ad (along with a picture of a woman with broom and dust-pan): "Is your wife having second thoughts about her career? Put her in business NOW...You can join her later (if you like). Get her into a career..." PAN the Porcine Journal. Picture the scene. Senator Ralph Yarborough, the folk hero of Texas liberals, addresses the Harris County Democrats (January 26). He is introduced by liberal State Rep. Ron Waters. He receives standing applause for his life-long record of humanistic causes. He says the "right" things about the FBI, CIA, and the DPS. He ends with the stirring words that there are more people in this room than there were signers of the Declaration of Independence, and more than were at the Alamo, but the "big difference" is that now the women are with us at election time "to help in the office and to answer the phones..." How disapPANting. Another great build up and let down came from Gene Shalit, film reviewer for the Today show. Shalit did a glowing feature review on Italian film director Lina Wertmuller and her new film, "Seven Beauties". "She is a feminist but not a fanatic," Shalit said. "Lina Wertmuller goes beyond being the world's greatest woman director. She transcends being a director. In fact," he concluded, "I suspect she's an enchantress." PAN the reviewer's script. In this column last month we mistakenly reported Sarah Caldwell is head of the Boston Symphony. She is, of course, head of the Boston Opera.