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Breakthrough 1976-03
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Breakthrough 1976-03 - Page 3. March 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4730/show/4716.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1976). Breakthrough 1976-03 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4730/show/4716

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-03 - Page 3, March 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4730/show/4716.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-03
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 3
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_515c.jpg
Transcript Woman of the Month An educator breaks down barrio barriers By Janice Blue and Olga Soliz GUADALUPE QUINTANILLA Had educator Guadalupe Quintanilla chosen politics as her life's career, the first woman President of the United States would no doubt be Spanish- surnamed. Guadalupe Quintanilla is currently director of the Mexican-American Studies Department and an instructor of Spanish at the University of Houston. In 1972-73 she was awarded the "Teaching Excellence Award." In January of this year she was appointed to an administrative position in the Office of the Vice President, Dean of Faculties, where her duties will focus on the recruitment of minority faculty. Yet, ten years ago, Lupita (as her friends and colleagues call her) Quintanilla was a fourth- grade drop-out who decided to go back to school when her three children were having difficulty in their studies. Quintanilla grew up in Brownsville and worked on her grandparents' ranch after dropping out of school. "We grew chickens and picked cotton," she recalls. "It was a good experience for me. I learned a lot of discipline and when I wasn't working, I did a lot of reading." Yet, when she was given an IQ test in her teens she scored a 67. "I somehow accepted that," she said, "because I didn't know what an IQ test was supposed to be." But, years later, when she volunteered as a Head Start teacher and her own children were having trouble in school, the principal told her, "The problem is you speak Spanish to your children at home." "That was the turning point for me," she says emphatically. "I could accept my being retarded but not my children and so many other bi-lingual Mexican- American children." Quintanilla realized something had to be wrong with the tests and in later years formulated tests for the bi-lingual student that did not rely so heavily on Anglo words and concepts. "For example," she said, "one question asked on tests was 'how many ears do you have?' and children would reply '5 or 6.' But what Mexican-Am eric an children were doing was translating directly 'quantos anos tienes?' - 'how many years do you have?' or 'how old are you?' " To help her children she wanted to learn English. "I asked a school counselor if I could just sit in the back of a class and listen to English being spoken but she said no because my records showed I didn't have the ability to learn. She told me to go to a hospital and work as an aide." At the hospital Quintanilla was told she needed a GED in order to even apply for the training program. Yet for two years previously they accepted her volunteer work at the hospital. On her own determination Lupita Quintanilla went to the nearest university and talked the registrar into allowing her to take some courses to prepare for the GED. After passing it she enrolled in Texas Southmost University and Pan American University. She drove 140 miles each day for three years while working on her undergraduate degree. "I used to follow the milk truck through each early morning fog on my drive to the university," Quintanilla recalled. "One morning it veered off the main road and I ended up at someone's ranch." Quintanilla graduated summa cum laude from Pan American University in 1969. Two years later on a move to Houston she received her master's from the University of Houston and is now near completion of her doctorate. While working toward her master's degree, the League of Mexican-American Students (LOMAS) and the Mexican- American Youth Organization (MAYO) brought attention to the administration for the need for a Chicano Studies Program. It took a three year struggle to reach administrative acceptance. MAYO chairwoman Maria Jimenez said at that time, "Many of the professors see Mexican- American studies programs as a fad, not as a legitimate field of study. They give the program to the students to keep them quiet. They think it will go away in awhile." Ten days before the fall semester 1972 was to begin Guadalupe Quintanilla was named director of the new Mexican-American Studies Program. Due largely to her efforts the program is now a permanent ethnic endeavor at the university providing students with a knowledge and appreciation of the Mexican American culture. Yet, looking back at those early days of the program Quintanilla admits her own consciousness was raised by feminists who challenged her first administrative act: the appointment of three male faculty members to the newly-created program. "I was a little surprised at the reaction," she recalls, adding "My own level of awareness was very low." Three women faculty members were subsequently hired. Quintanilla does not impart any of the attitudes of someone who has "made it on her own." She shares the story of her struggle in the hopes it will encourage other women to "take that first step." "My life has changed tremendously," she observes, "from being a completely devoted housewife and totally dependent person to being a professional, self-confident woman who can get any job well done." And, she is open and honest about the changes in the attitudes and feelings that took place between her "first" and "second" careers. "I used to feel useless. I had the feeling I was not accomplishing anything. I even had the feeling I was dumb - that everyone knew things I didn't." Married and a young mother in her teens she recalls "being home with a crying baby and feeling depressed while next door my girl friends were dating and going out dancing. I had the feeling I was drowning ... that I was never going to get out of it. "I resented my children for keeping me a prisoner in my own home. And, that is something no one would ever dare say in a Mexican-American home, but now I can. I can say that I felt I was a prisoner, that I was drowning, because each minute I had to care for somebody. My children were small and needed me but the feelings were still there. It is healthy to realize and reveal these feelings. It is unhealthy to cover them up - and we are supposed to cover them up." Her grandfather lived with her and her family until his death. Since he did not believe a woman should do anything outside the home she did not even go back to school until after he died. "But, at that point," she remembers, "if my husband, Cayetano, had not encouraged me and had said 'no, you cannot go back to school,' I would have stayed home. I was always told you do what the man tells you to do. Your place is in the home. Your life is with your children. You are a bad mother if you don't take care of your children.' " The way she reconciled these feelings was to try to give her family "quality" time rather than "quantity" time. "I've worked hard to give my children a model - to be a good example. It is because I love them so very much that I want to open new horizons for them. Seeing me work so hard for an education has given them the incentive. If I worked so hard - it must be worth it." Her son, Victor, is a student at the University of Houston, currently running for a student senate seat. Her son, Mario, is a freshman at Rice University and her daughter, Marta, is a high school student planning to go on to college. Lupita Quintanilla has so many concerns for the needs of others that it is striking to hear her express her own inner-directed feelings. "I always have the impression and firm belief that the motivating force for me to accomplish has been my children. I also think that in the traditional sense of what a woman should be, I have become selfish in the last two years because while I sincerely feel I have lived my life for my family and children and other children, I now want to see what I can do for Lupe. 'How can Lupe grow as a human being? How can Lupe become a better Lupe? — not only for the benefit of others, but also for Lupe?' " If anyone is deserving of such a "selfish" thought and goal, it is Lupita Quintanilla. She has given so much to others, it is time for her to think of "Lupe." AMPERSAND Incorporated writing & photography &? graphics & typography &? consultation Joyce Jane Weedman Nancy E. Van Cleave 120P/2LaRue Houston, Texas 70019 (713)523-0506 J J ' adadada music company \ J Adelaide Moorman Piano Lessons 528-0275 V Olga Soliz & Associates Management & Planning Consultants 2102WROXTON ROAD HOUSTON, TEXAS 77005 713/524-5005 WHAT'S NEW!! TCXY WASH IONS Prices you won't believe Brand names -.no labels Blouses, Pant Suits, Jeans, etc. 713-781-1571 GLADYS SHAVELL* 7968 A WESTHEIMER •HOUSTON. TEXAS 77042 (between Hillcroft & Fondren behind Stop & Go) Pit-cooked meats Home-style vegetables Opening March BIG TIMBER BAR-B-Q tt—rrn Brittmore and Old Katy Road Owners-operators, Gay Cosgriff, Jim Ward