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Houston Breakthrough 1980-04
Pages 24 and 25
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Pages 24 and 25. April 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4483.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Pages 24 and 25. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4483

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Pages 24 and 25, April 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4483.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-04
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Pages 24 and 25
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_559t.JPG
Transcript rzTTzm DR. ROCKIT: TAKING OFF Rhythm and blues and Rock Romano -BY KATHLEEN PACKLICK- Dr. Rockit is a hot new rhythm and blues band from Houston. They are the main feature at Anderson Fair every Wednesday night. The band is the brainchild of Bock Romano, who is no newcomer to the Houston music scene. The Smokin' Fitz and The Natives were his babies too. But to audiences these days, Bock Romano is Dr. Rockit. Kathleen Packlick: When did you start playing music? Rock Romano: I started playing professionally when I was getting out of the eighth grade of parochial school on the north side of Houston. I met a bunch of guys at St. Thomas High School. I had already been playing before that in a group called the Sultans. KP: What kind of music were you playing then? RR: We were playing Buddy Holly and Bo Diddley songs. If you were learning how to play the guitar, there were certain songs that you would learn and you'd play with friends and you'd ultimately end up in a band. We were just imitating the heroes and the stars and the pioneers of rock and roll. That's what I like about Doctor Rockit, it's just like the very first band I had. In the 10th grade, I met a bunch of cats that were playing around Bellaire and Lamar High Schools. They were called the Jim Askin's Combo. We were playing stuff that was on the radio-Elvis songs, rock and roll, Chuck Berry, Wine, Wine, Wine. Jim Askin's Combo was the ultimate fraternity party band. The pinnacle of our career was playing at fraternity parties when we were still in high school. I dropped out of sight for a couple of years and went to a seminary at the end of high school. I found out pretty quick that seminary life was not for me. When I came back, I got together with the same group of guys. I was in my first years of college at the University of St. Thomas where I studied art history. At the same time, I was in a rock and roll band that was doing real well in Houston. The same group of guys essentially were together for 10 years. We called ourselves the Sixpence and later the Fun and Games Commission. All throughout the 60's we recorded. We were nationally famous, actually. We had a number six record in Los Angeles. We did an album for UNI records from which a bunch of bubble gum hits were taken. After I dropped out of my contract with UNI records, I started this blues band with friends of mine called the Cat's Pajamas. The last incarnation of the band was with Mike Sunler, Joe Dugan and Carson Graham. We put together a lot of original music, but mostly 24 with a blues base. We opened a lot of gigs at Liberty Hall for Bobby Blue Bland. Since the Cat's Pajamas, I've always tried to put together a band that was oriented towards playing to straight ahead rhythm and blues instead of just rockin' out music. The Cat's Pajamas broke up about 1972. That's when I went out on the road as a private recording engineer and did a lot of freelance sessions everywhere from Atlanta to New York to New Orleans. I call those my years on the road. When I hit back in Houston, I decided that I really wanted to come and live here. That was 1975. I had burned a lot of bridges because I left without telling anybody. Getting back to Houston was like starting over. I had been out on the road wild and free and most of my friends were getting set in their ways. But I came to find out that I had a lot more friends than I thought, because that's when I started the Smokin' Fitz. The Smokin' Fitz was somewhere between Dan Hicks and Steely Dan. Bonnie Brown, being the spectacular soloist that she is, moved us into a jazz area. When Jimmy Bigelow joined us on the tenor sax, we really turned into a jazz band. Anyway, I was totally blown away at how many of my friends that I had known in the past came to see this band every Sunday night. I was real pleased. It gave me the confidence that something else could happen. KP: Why did the Smokin'Fitz break up? RR: The Smokin' Fitz broke up because we were all ready to go into different directions. It was hard to keep putting on street theatre and rock and roll jazz for very long. After six months of not playing in a band, Herschel Berry and I got together. We were working together at a factory and we used to talk every day about putting this band together. We'd go see Gatemouth Brown, or Herschel would come back from seeing Link Wray and Robert Gordon saying, "You gotta come see this cat. We gotta start a band like this." So, we put together the Natives. We did everything from "Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavor. ..," to Buddy Holly songs, to more serious rock and roll. The rock and roll madness surrounding the band was unbelieve- able. We started playing at Anderson Fair on Sunday nights. It got so wild that they were breaking records on Sunday nights that they never even set on weekends. The Natives just took off like crazy. Then, I got a yearning for a musical change and it was something that I was trying to make the Natives into at the beginning. Doctor Bock- it was the next step. I had a desire to have a