Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Breakthrough 1980-04
Page 11
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Page 11. April 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 17, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4474.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4474

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Page 11, April 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 17, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4474.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-04
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_559k.jpg
Transcript says ". . . both struggled to keep the sun from setting in the East upon their presidential hopes. "Though neither acknowledged a ray of gloom," continues the story, "defeat in Tuesday's twin bill of primaries (in New York and Connecticut ) could shred their once-impeccable credentials as serious contenders." In light of the fact that Kennedy won handily in both states, and Bush beat Reagan in Connecticut , we can assume that "clouds of hope" have been cast over their respective campaigns. Death doesn't sell," proclaimed the new owners of Houston City Magazine last month, as they killed the cover of the March issue and replaced it with a lifeless Statue of Liberty. The original cover was a tight, close-up shot of funeral director Robert Waltrip, The Emperor of Death, with a legend to the effect that "he buried Elvis Presley and he'll bury you." "It was a great cover," sighed Jerry Lazar, senior editor at the time, but since fired. "We thought it was one of the strongest we'd done. But then the new Emperors of Life came marching through the front door and that was that." Lazar said that (president) Wick Allison called the cover "bad editorial, bad marketing" and flipped it aside with the immortal words, "Death doesn't sell." The Waltrip story, by Alan Waldman, was good stuff, and ended with the promise of more to come in the April issue— "Next month: Bobby Waltrip has his day in court." Part two, scheduled for April, was killed by Allison too. So we'll never know if Bobby got his day in court. With all this killing going on, it is with several grains of salt that we read Allison's New Year's Resolutions in the April City. The new owner commits City to "deliver to our readers a sprightly, well- informed, tough-minded magazine ... We want to be fair, but we intend to be opinionated . . . The journalist's job is to get the facts, but a magazine's job'is to reach beyond the facts to tell its readers what the facts mean ... We want to strive toward the best. We may not always reach it, but we will keep trying. I can guarantee you that we will not allow ourselves to fall into the mediocrity that dominates the Houston press . . ." And so on. We hope the new owners of City will pull together a "tough-minded" magazine. God knows Houston needs it. And, judging from the last few issues, there are grounds for cautious optimism. But killing a "tough" cover and replacing it with the Statue of Liberty holding a tablet inscribed 'Business cards in 10 hours' is just plain deadly dull. It is no longer even debatable that women live under a sexual reign of terror," state the editors of Mother Jones, whose April issue is devoted almost entirely to "Sex, Porn and Male Rage." Henry Schipper, in "Filthy Lucre" takes us on "a tour of America's most profitable frontier." Porn is so profitable, reports Schipper, that its gross take for 1977 was four billion dollars—as much as for the conventional movie and music industries combined that year. "Pornography is indeed very American," concludes Schipper. In "The Politics of Porn," Deirdre English maintains that an important step in coming to terms with pornography is separating the men from the pornogra- phers, the fantasizers from the rapists. She argues that women have much to lose in an unswervingly critical attack on porn. Andrea Dworkin, in "The Prophet of Perversion: a new reading of the Marquis de Sade," claims that Sade's "ethic-the right to use any "object" of desire at will —resonates in every sphere. It will be no surprise to feminists—though leftists have always denied it—that Sade's writing and life were of a piece, a whole cloth soaked in the blood of women imagined and real." "The End of the Ride," by Amanda Spake, is a harrowing account of the ordeal of 15-year-old Mary Bell Vincent, who hitched a ride with a man who repeatedly raped and abused her, then cut off both her hands and left her for dead. "It would be easy," says Spake, "to dismiss Lawrence Singleton as just another psychopath ... We regard the rapists and the rippers we read about as such extreme aberrations that we can ignore the meaning of their acts, if not the acts themselves. Because we do not really understand the connection between sex and violence, submission and domination, eroticism and sadism, we say there is little connection. "Yet, there is a link that we understand intuitively For what Lawrence Singleton did was to act out a profound, almost mythic rage, an angry fear, a pecu- larly male emotion . . . His acts were sadistic, but his rage is generic. "This is not to say," concludes Spake, "that all men are rapists, batterers or maimers of women ... I do believe, though, that all men feel a rage similar to his. Most express it not violently, but in jokes, in fantasies, in contemptuous remarks, in subtle ways, which ridicule and reduce women to something less than what they are." Mother Jones does not presume, in these articles, to give answers to a tremendously complex question. It does, however, present "a basis upon which to examine the current debate over pornography and its relationship to sex, violence and male rage." And it does that very well. David Frost started out as a funny man on British TV. Recently, he chaired a round-table on the future for Yorkshire Television, a BBC area network and "introduced the discussion with a sort of ventriloquist's patter," reported 77?e Listener, a BBC publication. Frost's monologue inadvertently gave some clues as to why he made the switch from comedy. For example: "A team of experts flew to Iran to try and find out what makes the Ayatollah Khomeini tick—and, in particular, what makes him go cuckoo every half-hour. .." The panelists were finally allowed to participate. They included Professor Milton Friedman, who was optimistic about British government policy, British trade union leader Jack Jones, who was not, and Germaine Greer, who addressed the role of women in the labor force. "I hope most people will digest the fact," said Greer, "that families need two pay packets to live on and that women do not work for fun and they are not reserve labor any more . .. "As long as they exist as a reserve labor force," she continued, "they undermine the bargaining power of the other, stronger workers. I would hope for a drive to recruit women to the trade unions and to have them properly represented." Frost then asked about increased leisure for women. "Women don't have any leisure," responded Greer. "Women leave the factory at a run, because they have to do the shopping and collect the kids. Leisure is an unrealistic concept for most working women." Jack Jones concurred. "I think that Germaine Greer has talked a lot of common sense on the industrial front." Now that Greer lives in Oklahoma, Jones hoped she could help the trade union movement organize in the United States. HOUSIE OI= C:OI=l=l=l= MEANS Where women make policy and coffee! 2520 Rice Blvd. In the Village 524-0057 10-6/Mon-Fri 10-5 /Sat Closed Sun Pobega Food & Spirits Live Music, No Cover Charge 2402 Mandell at Fairview 522-6506 r Don't Waste Time Shopping • Fine tailoring for men & • Leased corporate wardrobes women • Alterations • Weaving • Fabric • Houston's first clothing . programs for your club or consultants organization Member: Custom Tailors and Designers Association of America 9 to 6 M-F • 10 to 2 Sat • Appointment preferred mike holsey Custom Clothes 2613 Richmond at Kirby 524-3303 fh APRIL 1980 11