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Houston Breakthrough 1980-04
Page 10
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Page 10. April 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4473.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4473

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Page 10, April 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4473.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-04
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_559j.jpg
Transcript Beads for hair braiding available in an assortment of colors & styles. AKftD/HOf> 2476 Times Blvd. 523-9350 BOOKSHOP Specializing in English and Foreign Books & Magazines MONDAY - SATURDAY 10-6 2272 W. Holcombe (Corner of Greenbriar) (713)668-0075 913 RICHMOND AVE. HOUSTON. TEXAS JACKSON 6-2691 U.S. vs. THEM American coverage of Iran called simplistic and sensational. BY GABRIELLE COSGRIFF In the current issue of the Columbia Journalism Review, Columbia professor Edward W. Said has written a devastating assessment of the coverage of events in Iran by American journalists. He is particularly critical of their treatment of Islam, the religion of 40 nations and 800 million people. Said questions why political events are reduced, in Pavlovian fashion, to the peculiarities of Islam. He feels that governmental and academic experts seem to have agreed implicitly not to recognize political developments as political, but to represent them as "a cosmic drama pitting civilization as we like it against the uncivilized and barbaric. Said, a distinguished scholar and author, painstakingly documents the shortcomings of the American media's coverage of Iran. As one example, he describes a three-minute ABC "course" on Islam "which was reduced to a rush of images and symbols: Mecca, Purdah, Chador, Sunni, Shi'ite (accompanied by a picture of young men beating themselves), Mullah, Ayatollah, Khomeini. Said compares American coverage to that of other countries, particularly to Eric Rouleau's series of articles in Le Monde: "Rouleau never used 'Islam' to explain events or personalities, because he viewed his reporter's rnandate as comprising the analysis of politics, societies and history . . . without resorting to ideological generalizations and mystifying rhetoric. No American reporter spent the kind of time Rouleau did reportirg the extended debate in Iran over the co stitu- tional referendum; nor did others match his analyses of the various parties, tactics of struggle, personalities, ideas and institutions vying for power and attention. "In sum," concludes Said, "Rouleau's reporting on Iran for Le Monde was political in the best sense of the word. The U.S. news media's simply was not; or, one could say, it was political in the bad sense. What seemed unfamiliar or strange to U.S. reporters was branded 'Islamic' and treated with commensurate hostility or derision . . . Cliches, caricatures, ignor ance, unqualified ethnocentrism and inaccuracy were inordinately evident, as was an almost total subservience to the government thesis that the only thing that mattered was 'not giving in to blackmail.' Along with this went a shocking assumption that if the U.S. had forgiven the ex- shah and declared him a charity case, it did not matter what Iranians (or Iranian history itself) had to say." CJR publisher Edward W. Barrett expresses his reservations about Said's story in Publisher's Notes, in that same issue. He says he has "strong feelings that a publisher should restrain most of his impulses to intervene in the editing process. Moreover, magazines should not go too far in telling authors what they should or should not say in bylined analysis or opinion articles." Having stated that, Barrett then takes Said to task, claiming that he "overstates his case in some respects, downplays the monstrous nature of seizing an embassy and staff, and confuses world outrage at the offense with press hostility to the Iranian revolution in general." Barrett then "questions" whether another writer in the same issue "blames media standards too much . i ." We reported last month that a Newsweek story quoted Barrett as saying that in the future the CJR would carry "no more than one feature article per issue criticizing the overall performance of the American press." Barrett responded to that story in a letter to Newsweek (March 17). "What I actually said was 'An occasional piece—say one major article per issue—by an outsider (a nonjournalist) sharply critical of American journalism in general is OK, probably desirable to shake up the profession—provided it is rational and does not distort the facts, and provided it is 'insulated' by heads and introduction if we do not basically agree with it. We are going too far if such overwhelmingly negative articles dominate any one issue of the Review." It is ironic that CJR, for almost 20 years the most thoughtful, uncompromising vehicle for media criticism in this country, should see fit to "insulate" itself from writers of media criticism. He knew how to savor the good life, and had the money to do it," began Time's write-up (March 24) on the fatal shooting of Dr. Herman Tarnover. "He was the author of the bestselling The Complete Scarsdale Medical Diet. He was an avid hunter and fisherman, and a connoisseur of good food, fine wine and thoroughbred women." A perfect encapsulation of the Playboy philosophy-that women, like food and wine, are mere accessories to "the good life." That lead was right in line with the rest of the story. Cliche-ridden and sensational, it read like a pulp novel: An attractive blond divorcee.. . shots rang out . . . the well-groomed headmistress of the prestigious Madeira School . . . the daughters of some of America's richest and most prominent families . . . small, elegant dinner parties... At Newsweek, "The Lady and the Doctor" had its share of cliches, but at least the lead showed more class (no 'thoroughbreds' here) and stuck to the facts: "They had been friends and frer quent companions for at least 15 years." Time described the woman accused in the shooting, Jean Struven Harris, as "daughter of a career military officer"— no mother, apparently. (One assumes the father was the officer, since it would certainly have been newsworthy were it the mother.) Harris thus joins those news celebrities born of a male parent only. This male equivalent of parthenogenesis is apparently far more common than its female counterpart. Only one of those is on record, and that happened 1,980 years ago, if at all. Into each life a little sun must fall, if we are to believe the metaphorically mixed story on the front page of the Houston Post, March 25. In "Kennedy, Bush scramble for crucial support in 2 races," an Associated Press writer 10 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH