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Houston Breakthrough 1980-04
Page 7
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Page 7. April 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4470.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4470

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Page 7, April 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4470.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-04
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_559g.jpg
Transcript and end the "buddy system" where civil service is bypassed in hiring and advancement. Tinsley said she heard complaints about "department heads posting job notices on the back wall where nobody could see it." She, too, has heard about the "word of mouth recruitment." Appel's commission called for an expansion of the affirmative action office so that it would be more than a complaint desk. Tinsley said Calloway's office is understaffed. The commission also called for training programs for entry into city jobs and placement in advanced categories. Calloway's office is developing a survey to determine what types of programs city employees are interested in before the city offers training. They plan to relate that realistically to whatever vacancies are available. Waghalter heard of classes where 300 women were trained for a Typist III position. "There weren't positions for these people," she said. "That creates a high level of frustration," added Tinsley. Back in 1977, the report noted that if the progress of women employees continued along similar patterns, it would be 1994 before there was job equality. "We're just trying to speed it up," said Tinsley. Next month: Interviews with Erie Calloway, director of the affirmative action division, and Al James, director of the civil service department. Janice Blue is an editor of Breakthrough. Where to start? BY FRANCES OTTO The women that come to the Vocational Guidance Service for help are either tired of working in dead end jobs, or they are homemakers who are attempting to reenter the job market. "When a woman comes to us and is unclear about what she wants to do with her life, or doesn't know what her capabilities are, we give her in-depth vocational guidance counseling," says Gaye Brown-Burke, Division Director of VGS. "We show her the variety of jobs that are open to her in order to broaden her horizons." This first stage of the program is an educational thrust. It is designed to explain what alternatives women have to the traditional clerical job. The program includes seminars and workshops on developing job-seeking skills such as how to write a resume and how to dress for an interview. There are also seminars to help women become aware of themselves and of their capabilities as well as their limitations. "When someone comes to us and says 'I don't know where I'm going or what I want to do.' we attempt to find the unique skills that she possesses and then qo from there," Brown-Burke says. "Most of the women that come to us need a job now," she says, "so not many go back to school full time or even part time. What we're really here for is to link these women to the resources that will help them make decisions on a new career based on their interests and capabilities." After a woman has gone through the seminars and workshops and has made a decision as to the career she wants, the guidance service then refers her to a job. "We have a lot of contact with the business community in finding jobs for these women," Brown-Burke says. "Even though the program is oriented towards non-traditional careers for women, we will work with women who have decided they want a traditional job, although we do introduce them to other occupations so they know they have a variety of choices." Some of the careers women have chosen in the past ranged from carpet laying to printing to commission sales. According to Brown-Burke, most women who come to the guidance service are looking for upward mobility and more money. Especially more money. Brown-Burke has been with the service since 1971 and observes that the average age level of women seeking help has gone up considerably to about 30 years old. She says they used to work a lot with high school seniors and young women VGS staff members (I to r): Terri Constable, Carl Webster, and Gayle Brown-Burke help women entering and re-entering the job market. just out of college. Counseling and Placement There is a second program offered by the guidance service called the Counseling and Placement Program. This program does much more extensive couseling and is available to men as well as women. In this program, counseling is on an individual basis and usually lasts seven to eight weeks, whereas Women Work for Work is based on group participation in seminars and lasts only as long as it is necessary for the woman to decide on a career she is interested in. There is a fee to join the couseling and placement program based on a sliding scale and your ability to pay. The Women Work for Work program is free with the exception of an occasional small fee for a seminar. "Each person is given a battery of interest, personality, IQ and aptitude tests," Carl Webster says. "We want these women to go out and make some of the good money that men have been making for years," says Webster, a counselor in the program. The Counseling and Placement program was the original program in the Jewish Vocational Guidance Service which was started 34 years ago. Eventually the name was changed to the Vocational Guidance Service (VGS), and more recently to VGS, Inc. The service is located at 2525 San Jacinto and is a United Way agency. The service also has a third program which began in September of 1979, in MUM4S JAZZPLACE 2016 Main 659-1004 Tuesday-Saturday ROSEANNA VITRO with Strings and Things Exceptional jazz singer—late of Houston but now Manhattan-based—brings talented quartet that includes Bliss Rodriguez (piano) and Scott Hardy (guitar). She is "...one of the most promising young jazz vocalists around..." —John Scarborough Houston Chronicle Sundays 8 PM-12:30 AM Add Lib Houston's All-Woman Jazz Band Sextet featuring vocalist Joyce Webb Exciting group that turned some heads last year after premiere appearance—at 79 Women's Jazz Festival in Kansas City- was broadcast nationally by NBC and CBS. Picked to kick off 79 Alley Jazz Series, then— in first club engagement—drew enthusiastic crowds to MUMS last August. "...some first rate blowing... they could roar with maximum funk." — Bob Claypool Houston Post Tuesday-Saturday MARION COWINGS acclaimed New York "bebop" singer—appears with trio in limited engagement. Star of off-Broadway hit, 'Bebop, The Hip Musical." ("Bebop' projects the sounds of an entire era...a joyous success."— New York Daily News) Has performed with greats— from Jimi Hendrix to Yuseff Lateef— and worked five years with Lambert, Hendricks and Ross ROSCOS CAFE & JAZZBAR 3230 Chimney Rock 783-5013 um s Nobody Con Do It Likjf You Con! . . .and if you have a genuine desire to make the most of your abilities, McDonald's is interested in who you are and what you've done. Your experience doesn't have to be in restaurant operation either. If you have a ' record of accomplishment, regardless of the business, you can become a McDonald's Manager. You'll start by learning to take charge of a million dollar business—a McDonald's Restaurant. You will also start with a salary of $11,000 to $16,000 a year, or more if your qualifications are exceptional. This is the training ground, for we promote from within, and your success as a store manager leads directly to your promotion to corporate management. You can advance to positions such as Multi-Unit Supervisor, Corporate Liaison to our Licensees, or Corporate Management Development and Training Supervisor. We need assertive, ambitious people who aren't afraid of success, so bring us your proven ability to handle people (including teenagers), run an operation and understand what budgeting is all about. McDonald's will take it from there. For the best future and benefits that include complete medical, dental, and life insurance, paid vacations, and profit sharing, bring your career to McDonald's. We're waiting to hear from you! Personnel Department 682-1651 McDonald's Corporation 10900 Northwest Freeway Suite 222 Houston, Texas 77092 McDonalds We Are An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F APRIL 1980